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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles from Mountain View
Based on 2 articles published since 2008
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These are the 2 published articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders that originated from Mountain View during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Genome-wide analysis of insomnia in 1,331,010 individuals identifies new risk loci and functional pathways. 2019

Jansen, Philip R / Watanabe, Kyoko / Stringer, Sven / Skene, Nathan / Bryois, Julien / Hammerschlag, Anke R / de Leeuw, Christiaan A / Benjamins, Jeroen S / Muñoz-Manchado, Ana B / Nagel, Mats / Savage, Jeanne E / Tiemeier, Henning / White, Tonya / Anonymous3351197 / Tung, Joyce Y / Hinds, David A / Vacic, Vladimir / Wang, Xin / Sullivan, Patrick F / van der Sluis, Sophie / Polderman, Tinca J C / Smit, August B / Hjerling-Leffler, Jens / Van Someren, Eus J W / Posthuma, Danielle. ·Department of Complex Trait Genetics, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research, Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. · Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, UK. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Social, Health and Organisational Psychology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Department of Experimental Psychology, Helmholtz Institute, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Genetics, Section of Complex Trait Genetics, Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Psychiatry, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. · 23andMe, Inc., Mountain View, CA, USA. · Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. · Department of Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research, Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (an institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences), Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Departments of Psychiatry and Integrative Neurophysiology, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research, Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University, Amsterdam University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Complex Trait Genetics, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research, Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. d.posthuma@vu.nl. · Department of Clinical Genetics, Section of Complex Trait Genetics, Amsterdam Neuroscience, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. d.posthuma@vu.nl. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #30804565.

ABSTRACT: Insomnia is the second most prevalent mental disorder, with no sufficient treatment available. Despite substantial heritability, insight into the associated genes and neurobiological pathways remains limited. Here, we use a large genetic association sample (n = 1,331,010) to detect novel loci and gain insight into the pathways, tissue and cell types involved in insomnia complaints. We identify 202 loci implicating 956 genes through positional, expression quantitative trait loci, and chromatin mapping. The meta-analysis explained 2.6% of the variance. We show gene set enrichments for the axonal part of neurons, cortical and subcortical tissues, and specific cell types, including striatal, hypothalamic, and claustrum neurons. We found considerable genetic correlations with psychiatric traits and sleep duration, and modest correlations with other sleep-related traits. Mendelian randomization identified the causal effects of insomnia on depression, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, and the protective effects of educational attainment and intracranial volume. Our findings highlight key brain areas and cell types implicated in insomnia, and provide new treatment targets.

2 Article GWAS of 89,283 individuals identifies genetic variants associated with self-reporting of being a morning person. 2016

Hu, Youna / Shmygelska, Alena / Tran, David / Eriksson, Nicholas / Tung, Joyce Y / Hinds, David A. ·23andMe, Inc., 899 W Evelyn Avenue, Mountain View, California 94043 USA. · Department of Biological Sciences, San Jose State University, San Jose, California 95112 USA. ·Nat Commun · Pubmed #26835600.

ABSTRACT: Circadian rhythms are a nearly universal feature of living organisms and affect almost every biological process. Our innate preference for mornings or evenings is determined by the phase of our circadian rhythms. We conduct a genome-wide association analysis of self-reported morningness, followed by analyses of biological pathways and related phenotypes. We identify 15 significantly associated loci, including seven near established circadian genes (rs12736689 near RGS16, P=7.0 × 10(-18); rs9479402 near VIP, P=3.9 × 10(-11); rs55694368 near PER2, P=2.6 × 10(-9); rs35833281 near HCRTR2, P=3.7 × 10(-9); rs11545787 near RASD1, P=1.4 × 10(-8); rs11121022 near PER3, P=2.0 × 10(-8); rs9565309 near FBXL3, P=3.5 × 10(-8). Circadian and phototransduction pathways are enriched in our results. Morningness is associated with insomnia and other sleep phenotypes; and is associated with body mass index and depression but we did not find evidence for a causal relationship in our Mendelian randomization analysis. Our findings reinforce current understanding of circadian biology and will guide future studies.