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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles from SRI International
Based on 13 articles published since 2009
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These are the 13 published articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders that originated from SRI International during 2009-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Insomnia disorder in adolescence: Diagnosis, impact, and treatment. 2018

de Zambotti, Massimiliano / Goldstone, Aimee / Colrain, Ian M / Baker, Fiona C. ·Center for Health Sciences, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA, USA. Electronic address: massimiliano.dezambotti@sri.com. · Center for Health Sciences, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA, USA. · Center for Health Sciences, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA, USA; Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia. · Center for Health Sciences, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA, USA; Brain Function Research Group, School of Physiology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. ·Sleep Med Rev · Pubmed #28974427.

ABSTRACT: Insomnia disorder is very common in adolescents; it is particularly manifest in older adolescents and girls, with a prevalence comparable to that of other major psychiatric disorders (e.g., depressive disorders). However, insomnia disorder in adolescence is poorly characterized, under-recognized, under-diagnosed, and under-treated, and the reason for the female preponderance for insomnia that emerges after puberty is largely unknown. Insomnia disorder goes beyond an individual complaint of poor sleep or a sleep state misperception, and there is emerging evidence supporting the association of insomnia symptoms in adolescents with alterations in several bio-systems including functional cortical alterations and systemic inflammation. Insomnia disorder is associated with depression and other psychiatric disorders, and is an independent risk factor for suicidality and substance use in adolescents, raising the possibility that treating insomnia symptoms in early adolescence may reduce risk for these adverse outcomes. Cognitive behavioral treatments have proven efficacy for adolescent insomnia and online methods seem to offer promising cost-effective options. Current evidence indicates that insomnia in adolescence is an independent entity that warrants attention as a public health concern in its own right.

2 Review Sleep and the brain. 2011

Colrain, Ian M. ·Human Sleep Research Program, SRI International, 333 Ravenswood Avenue, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA. ian.colrain@sri.com ·Neuropsychol Rev · Pubmed #21259122.

ABSTRACT: Sleep is a fundamental behavior ubiquitous in the animal kingdom, necessary for the support of physical health and in humans for the maintenance of cognitive function. While it influences all body systems, it is particularly important for the brain and is typically characterized using measures of brain electrical activity. Sleep undergoes predictable changes across the lifespan, with notably dramatic alterations occurring during adolescence and with old age. Over and above the normal development changes, however, upwards of a third of the adult population experience some form of insomnia on a regular basis. This issue's special section on "Sleep through the Ages" contains papers addressing the neurological and neuropsychological implications of sleep in adolescents, older adults and insomnia sufferers, highlighting relations of sleep with brain structure and function.

3 Article Menstrual cycle-related variation in autonomic nervous system functioning in women in the early menopausal transition with and without insomnia disorder. 2017

de Zambotti, Massimiliano / Trinder, John / Colrain, Ian M / Baker, Fiona C. ·Center for Health Sciences, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA, 94025, USA. · Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, 3010, Australia. · Center for Health Sciences, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA, 94025, USA; Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, 3010, Australia. · Center for Health Sciences, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA, 94025, USA; Brain Function Research Group, School of Physiology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, 2000, South Africa. Electronic address: fiona.baker@sri.com. ·Psychoneuroendocrinology · Pubmed #27770662.

ABSTRACT: Insomnia is considered a hyperarousal disorder, in which several psychophysiological domains including the autonomic nervous system (ANS) are over-activated, potentially contributing to increased risk for cardiovascular (CV) disease. Here, we aimed to determine whether insomnia that develops in the context of the transition to menopause (menopausal transition insomnia, MTI) is similarly characterized by autonomic arousal. We also took into account modulation of the ANS by the hormonal changes of the menstrual cycle, a factor that has not previously been considered in studies on insomnia. Twenty one women with insomnia (49.0±3y) and 25 controls (48.8±2.6 y), also in the menopausal transition, had overnight laboratory-based polysomnographic recordings, including electrocardiograph, during the follicular and/or luteal (progesterone≥3ngml

4 Article Altered nocturnal blood pressure profiles in women with insomnia disorder in the menopausal transition. 2017

de Zambotti, Massimiliano / Trinder, John / Javitz, Harold / Colrain, Ian M / Baker, Fiona C. ·1Center for Health Sciences, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA 2Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia 3Division of Education, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA 4Brain Function Research Group, School of Physiology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. ·Menopause · Pubmed #27749736.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Insomnia disorder is a risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) pathology. It is unknown whether insomnia that develops in the context of the menopausal transition (MT) impacts the CV system. We assessed nocturnal blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) profiles in women with insomnia disorder in the MT. METHODS: Twelve women meeting DSM-IV criteria for insomnia in the MT (age, mean ± SD: 50.5 ± 3.6 y) and 11 controls (age, mean ± SD: 49.0 ± 3.0 y) had polysomnographic recordings on one or two nights during which beat-to-beat BP and HR were assessed and analyzed hourly from lights-out across the first 6 hours of the night and according to sleep stage. Physiological hot flashes were identified from fluctuations in sternal skin conductance. RESULTS: Women with insomnia and controls had similar distributions of sleep stages and awakenings/arousals across hours of the night, although insomnia participants tended to have more wakefulness overall. More women in the insomnia group (7 of 12) than in the control group (2 of 11) had at least one physiological hot flash at night (P < 0.05). Both groups showed a drop in BP in the first part of the night; however, systolic and diastolic BP patterns diverged later, remaining low in controls but increasing in insomnia participants 4 to 6 hours after lights-out (P < 0.05). Both groups showed a similar pattern of decline in HR across the night. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest altered regulatory control of BP during sleep in the MT insomnia. The causes and long-term consequences of this altered nocturnal BP profile remain to be determined.

5 Article Acute stress alters autonomic modulation during sleep in women approaching menopause. 2016

de Zambotti, Massimiliano / Sugarbaker, David / Trinder, John / Colrain, Ian M / Baker, Fiona C. ·Center for Health Sciences, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA. · Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia. · Center for Health Sciences, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA; Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia. · Center for Health Sciences, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA; Brain Function Research Group, School of Physiology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2000, South Africa. Electronic address: fiona.baker@sri.com. ·Psychoneuroendocrinology · Pubmed #26766119.

ABSTRACT: Hot flashes, hormones, and psychosocial factors contribute to insomnia risk in the context of the menopausal transition. Stress is a well-recognized factor implicated in the pathophysiology of insomnia; however the impact of stress on sleep and sleep-related processes in perimenopausal women remains largely unknown. We investigated the effect of an acute experimental stress (impending Trier Social Stress Task in the morning) on pre-sleep measures of cortisol and autonomic arousal in perimenopausal women with and without insomnia that developed in the context of the menopausal transition. In addition, we assessed the macro- and micro-structure of sleep and autonomic functioning during sleep. Following adaptation to the laboratory, twenty two women with (age: 50.4 ± 3.2 years) and eighteen women without (age: 48.5 ± 2.3 years) insomnia had two randomized in-lab overnight recordings: baseline and stress nights. Anticipation of the task resulted in higher pre-sleep salivary cortisol levels and perceived tension, faster heart rate and lower vagal activity, based on heart rate variability measures, in both groups of women. The effect of the stress manipulation on the autonomic nervous system extended into the first 4 h of the night in both groups. However, vagal tone recovered 4-6 h into the stress night in controls but not in the insomnia group. Sleep macrostructure was largely unaltered by the stress, apart from a delayed latency to REM sleep in both groups. Quantitative analysis of non-rapid eye movement sleep microstructure revealed greater electroencephalographic (EEG) power in the beta1 range (15-≤23 Hz), reflecting greater EEG arousal during sleep, on the stress night compared to baseline, in the insomnia group. Hot flash frequency remained similar on both nights for both groups. These results show that pre-sleep stress impacts autonomic nervous system functioning before and during sleep in perimenopausal women with and without insomnia. Findings also indicate that women with insomnia had increased EEG arousal and lacked recovery in vagal activity across the stress night suggesting a greater sensitivity to stress in this group.

6 Article Personality Shapes the Experience of Insomnia in Women: Commentary on Dørheim et al., Personality and Perinatal Maternal Insomnia: A Study across Childbirth. 2016

Baker, Fiona C. ·a Human Sleep Research, Center for Health Sciences SRI International , Menlo Park , California , USA. ·Behav Sleep Med · Pubmed #26650144.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Article Insomnia in women approaching menopause: Beyond perception. 2015

Baker, Fiona C / Willoughby, Adrian R / Sassoon, Stephanie A / Colrain, Ian M / de Zambotti, Massimiliano. ·Center for Health Sciences, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA, USA; Brain Function Research Group, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. Electronic address: fiona.baker@sri.com. · Center for Health Sciences, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA, USA. · Center for Health Sciences, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA, USA; Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, VIC, Australia. ·Psychoneuroendocrinology · Pubmed #26142241.

ABSTRACT: The menopausal transition is marked by increased prevalence in disturbed sleep and insomnia, present in 40-60% of women, but evidence for a physiological basis for their sleep complaints is lacking. We aimed to quantify sleep disturbance and the underlying contribution of objective hot flashes in 72 women (age range: 43-57 years) who had (38 women), compared to those who had not (34 women), developed clinical insomnia in association with the menopausal transition. Sleep quality was assessed with two weeks of sleep diaries and one laboratory polysomnographic (PSG) recording. In multiple regression models controlling for menopausal transition stage, menstrual cycle phase, depression symptoms, and presence of objective hot flashes, a diagnosis of insomnia predicted PSG-measured total sleep time (p < 0.01), sleep efficiency (p = 0.01) and wakefulness after sleep onset (WASO) (p = 0.01). Women with insomnia had, on average, 43.5 min less PSG-measured sleep time (p < 0.001). There was little evidence of cortical EEG hyperarousal in insomniacs apart from elevated beta EEG power during REM sleep. Estradiol and follicle stimulating hormone levels were unrelated to beta EEG power but were associated with the frequency of hot flashes. Insomniacs were more likely to have physiological hot flashes, and the presence of hot flashes predicted the number of PSG-awakenings per hour of sleep (p = 0.03). From diaries, women with insomnia reported more WASO (p = 0.002), more night-to-night variability in WASO (p < 0.002) and more hot flashes (p = 0.012) compared with controls. Women who develop insomnia in the approach to menopause have a measurable sleep deficit, with almost 50% of the sample having less than 6h of sleep. Compromised sleep that develops in the context of the menopausal transition should be addressed, taking into account unique aspects of menopause like hot flashes, to avoid the known negative health consequences associated with insufficient sleep and insomnia in midlife women.

8 Article Menstrual Cycle-Related Variation in Physiological Sleep in Women in the Early Menopausal Transition. 2015

de Zambotti, Massimiliano / Willoughby, Adrian R / Sassoon, Stephanie A / Colrain, Ian M / Baker, Fiona C. ·Center for Health Sciences (M.d.Z., A.R.W., S.A.S., I.M.C., F.C.B.), SRI International, Menlo Park, California 94025 · Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences (I.M.C.), The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia · and Brain Function Research Group (F.C.B.), School of Physiology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2000, South Africa. ·J Clin Endocrinol Metab · Pubmed #26079775.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: Most studies show sleep homeostasis and continuity remain stable across the menstrual cycle in young women. The influence of the menstrual cycle on physiological sleep in midlife women is unknown. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to assess the impact of menstrual cycle phase on the polysomnogram and electroencephalographic (EEG) features of sleep in midlife women, accounting for the presence of an insomnia disorder. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: This was a laboratory study of 20 women in the early menopausal transition (48.8 ± 2.9 y), 11 with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition, diagnosis of insomnia, studied on one night each in the follicular and luteal menstrual cycle phases. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Polysomnographic and sleep EEG indices were measured. RESULTS: Both groups of women had more awakenings (P = .003) and arousals (P = .025) per hour of sleep and less percentage slow wave sleep (P = .024) when progesterone was raised (≥3 ng/mL(-1)) during the luteal compared with the follicular phase. Both groups had greater spindle density (P = .007), longer spindles (P = .037), and increased 14-17 Hz EEG activity in the luteal phase (P < .05), although for the 15- to 16-Hz bin, this effect was significant only in women without insomnia (P < .001). Women with insomnia had a shorter sleep duration (P = .012), more wakefulness after sleep onset (P = .031), and a lower sleep efficiency (P = .034) than women without insomnia, regardless of menstrual cycle phase. CONCLUSION: Sleep is more disrupted in the luteal phase compared with the follicular phase in midlife women, whether or not they have an insomnia disorder. There is a prominent increase in sleep spindles and spindle frequency activity in the luteal phase, likely an effect of progesterone and/or its neuroactive metabolites acting on sleep regulatory systems.

9 Article Nocturnal cardiac autonomic profile in young primary insomniacs and good sleepers. 2014

de Zambotti, Massimiliano / Cellini, Nicola / Baker, Fiona C / Colrain, Ian M / Sarlo, Michela / Stegagno, Luciano. ·Department of General Psychology, University of Padua, Italy; Center for Health Sciences, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA, USA. Electronic address: massimiliano.dezambotti@sri.com. · Department of General Psychology, University of Padua, Italy. · Center for Health Sciences, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA, USA; Brain Function Research Group, School of Physiology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. · Center for Health Sciences, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA, USA; Department of Psychology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia. ·Int J Psychophysiol · Pubmed #24998642.

ABSTRACT: We investigated cardiac vagal and sympathetic activity in 13 young primary insomniacs (PI; 24.4±1.6years) and 14 good sleepers (GS; 23.3±2.5years) during nocturnal sleep. Pre-ejection period (PEP; inversely related to beta-adrenergic sympathetic activity), interval between consecutive R-waves (RR), and vagal-related indices of time- and frequency-domain heart rate variability were computed during pre-sleep wakefulness and undisturbed arousal-free sleep stages (N2, SWS, REM) as well as across the whole night irrespective of the presence of disruptive sleep events (e.g. sleep arousals/awakenings) and/or sleep stage transitions. Groups exhibited a similar vagal activity throughout each undisturbed sleep stage as well as considering the whole night, with a higher modulation during sleep compared to prior wakefulness. However, PEP was constantly shorter (higher sympathetic activity) during pre-sleep wakefulness and each sleep stage in PI compared to GS. Moreover, pre-sleep RR intervals were positively associated with sleep efficiency and negatively associated with wake after sleep onset in PI. Altogether our findings indicated a dysfunctional sympathetic activity but a normal parasympathetic modulation before and during sleep in young adults with insomnia.

10 Article Impaired off-line motor skills consolidation in young primary insomniacs. 2014

Cellini, Nicola / de Zambotti, Massimiliano / Covassin, Naima / Sarlo, Michela / Stegagno, Luciano. ·Department of General Psychology, University of Padova, Via Venezia 8, 35131 Padova, Italy. Electronic address: cellini.nicola@gmail.com. · Department of General Psychology, University of Padova, Via Venezia 8, 35131 Padova, Italy; Center for Health Sciences, SRI International, 333 Ravenswood Avenue, Menlo Park 94043, CA, USA. Electronic address: massimiliano.dezambotti@sri.com. · Department of General Psychology, University of Padova, Via Venezia 8, 35131 Padova, Italy. Electronic address: Covassin.Naima@mayo.edu. · Department of General Psychology, University of Padova, Via Venezia 8, 35131 Padova, Italy. Electronic address: michela.sarlo@unipd.it. · Department of General Psychology, University of Padova, Via Venezia 8, 35131 Padova, Italy. Electronic address: luciano.stegagno@unipd.it. ·Neurobiol Learn Mem · Pubmed #24954844.

ABSTRACT: Compelling evidence indicates that sleep can facilitate the off-line consolidation of declarative, perceptual, emotional and procedural memories. Here we assessed the sleep-related off-line consolidation of motor skills in 13 young primary insomniacs (23.31±2.5 yrs) compared to 13 healthy sleepers (24.31±1.6 yrs) using the sequential finger tapping task. During a training session insomniacs performed less correct sequences than controls. However, both groups exhibited similar on-line motor learning in the pre-sleep evening session. After a night of sleep, healthy controls improved their performance, indicating an overnight effect of sleep on motor skills consolidation. In contrast, insomniacs failed to exhibit a sleep-related enhancement in memory performance indicating impairment in the off-line motor skills consolidation process. Our results suggest that young adults with insomnia experience impaired off-line memory consolidation which seems not to be associated with reduced ability to acquire new motor information.

11 Article Association between personality traits and DSM-IV diagnosis of insomnia in peri- and postmenopausal women. 2014

Sassoon, Stephanie A / de Zambotti, Massimiliano / Colrain, Ian M / Baker, Fiona C. ·From the 1Center for Health Sciences, Biosciences Division, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA; 2Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; and 3Brain Function Research Group, School of Physiology, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. ·Menopause · Pubmed #24448105.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the role of personality factors in the development of DSM-IV insomnia coincident with perimenopause. METHODS: Perimenopausal women (35 women with DSM-IV insomnia and 28 women with self-reported normal sleep) underwent clinical assessments and completed menopause-related questionnaires, the NEO Five Factor Inventory and the Structured Interview for DSM-IV Personality. Logistic regressions determined whether personality factors and hot flash-related interference were associated with an insomnia diagnosis concurrent with the menopausal transition. RESULTS: Women with insomnia reported higher neuroticism, lower agreeableness, and lower conscientiousness than controls on the NEO Five Factor Inventory. Moreover, women with insomnia were more likely to meet DSM-IV criteria for cluster C personality disorders, particularly obsessive-compulsive personality disorder, on the Structured Interview for DSM-IV Personality. Women with insomnia were more likely to have had a past depressive episode and a history of severe premenstrual symptoms. Findings from regressions revealed that higher neuroticism and greater interference from hot flashes were associated with insomnia classification even after controlling for history of depression, suggesting that sensitivity to hot flashes and a greater degree of neuroticism are independent contributors toward establishing which women are most likely to have sleep problems during perimenopause. CONCLUSIONS: Findings show the relevance of personality factors, particularly neuroticism and obsessive-compulsive personality, to a woman's experience of insomnia as she goes through the menopausal transition.

12 Article Heightened awareness in insomnia. 2012

Colrain, Ian M. ·Human Sleep Research Program, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA 94043, USA. ian.colrain@sri.com ·Sleep · Pubmed #22467980.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Article Effects of ramelteon and triazolam in a mouse genetic model of early morning awakenings. 2009

Wisor, Jonathan P / Jiang, Peng / Striz, Martin / O'Hara, Bruce F. ·Center for Neuroscience, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA. J_Wisor@wsu.edu ·Brain Res · Pubmed #19664610.

ABSTRACT: The onset of the daily wheel running bout precedes dark onset by several hours in the early runner genetic variant of mice. Here, we test the hypothesis that timed daily administration of a melatonin agonist, ramelteon, or a benzodiazepine, triazolam, normalizes the timing of daily wheel-running rhythms in early runner mice. The daily profiles of wheel-running activity of early runner mice were monitored continuously in a 12:12 light/dark cycle. Wheel running was assessed before, during and after timed daily oral administration of saline vehicle (n=12), ramelteon (10 mg/kg, n=12), or triazolam (1 mg/kg, n=12). The timing of wheel-running rhythms relative to the light/dark cycle was used as a measure of the timing of wake onset. Under baseline conditions, early runner mice entrained to a light/dark cycle at an advanced phase, approximately 3 h before dark onset, on average. Triazolam, but not ramelteon, suppressed wheel-running acutely when administered just prior to the time at which wheel-running onset had occurred under baseline conditions. On a washout day under a light/dark cycle subsequent to one week of once daily administration, the onset of wheel-running was delayed relative to baseline in both ramelteon-treated mice and triazolam-treated mice. In constant dark subsequent to a second week of once daily administration, the onset of wheel-running activity was not affected by either compound. Thus, ramelteon and triazolam caused a shift in the timing of wheel-running rhythms in an LD cycle but did so without long-term effects on the functioning of the circadian clock.