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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles from San Diego State University
Based on 7 articles published since 2008
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These are the 7 published articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders that originated from San Diego State University during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Sleep disorders in the elderly. 2010

Roepke, Susan K / Ancoli-Israel, Sonia. ·Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology, San Diego State University/University of California, San Diego, USA. ·Indian J Med Res · Pubmed #20308755.

ABSTRACT: Nearly half of older adults report difficulty initiating and maintaining sleep. With age, several changes occur that can place one at risk for sleep disturbance including increased prevalence of medical conditions, increased medication use, age-related changes in various circadian rhythms, and environmental and lifestyle changes. Although sleep complaints are common among all age groups, older adults have increased prevalence of many primary sleep disorders including sleep-disordered breathing, periodic limb movements in sleep, restless legs syndrome, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder, insomnia, and circadian rhythm disturbances. The present review discusses age-related changes in sleep architecture, aetiology, presentation, and treatment of sleep disorders prevalent among the elderly and other factors relevant to ageing that are likely to affect sleep quality and quantity.

2 Clinical Trial Sleep Quality Improvement During Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety Disorders. 2016

Ramsawh, Holly J / Bomyea, Jessica / Stein, Murray B / Cissell, Shadha H / Lang, Ariel J. ·a Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress, Department of Psychiatry , Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. · b San Diego State University/University of California San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology. · c Department of Psychiatry , University of California San Diego. · d Department of Family & Preventive Medicine , University of California San Diego. · e Veterans Administration San Diego Health Care System , Center of Excellence for Stress and Mental Health. ·Behav Sleep Med · Pubmed #26244485.

ABSTRACT: Despite the ubiquity of sleep complaints among individuals with anxiety disorders, few prior studies have examined whether sleep quality improves during anxiety treatment. The current study examined pre- to posttreatment sleep quality improvement during cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for panic disorder (PD; n = 26) or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; n = 24). Among sleep quality indices, only global sleep quality and sleep latency improved significantly (but modestly) during CBT. Sleep quality improvement was greater for treatment responders, but did not vary by diagnosis. Additionally, poor baseline sleep quality was independently associated with worse anxiety treatment outcome, as measured by higher intolerance of uncertainty. Additional intervention targeting sleep prior to or during CBT for anxiety may be beneficial for poor sleepers.

3 Article Commuting and Sleep: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sueño Ancillary Study. 2018

Petrov, Megan E / Weng, Jia / Reid, Kathryn J / Wang, Rui / Ramos, Alberto R / Wallace, Douglas M / Alcantara, Carmela / Cai, Jianwen / Perreira, Krista / Espinoza Giacinto, Rebeca A / Zee, Phyllis C / Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela / Patel, Sanjay R. ·College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona. Electronic address: megan.petrov@asu.edu. · Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Neurology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois. · Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Neurology, University of Miami, Miami, Florida. · School of Social Work, Columbia University, New York, New York. · Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center, Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. · Department of Health Policy Management, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. · School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, California. · Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ·Am J Prev Med · Pubmed #29338957.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Commute time is associated with reduced sleep time, but previous studies have relied on self-reported sleep assessment. The present study investigated the relationships between commute time for employment and objective sleep patterns among non-shift working U.S. Hispanic/Latino adults. METHODS: From 2010 to 2013, Hispanic/Latino employed, non-shift-working adults (n=760, aged 18-64 years) from the Sueño study, ancillary to the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, reported their total daily commute time to and from work, completed questionnaires on sleep and other health behaviors, and wore wrist actigraphs to record sleep duration, continuity, and variability for 1 week. Survey linear regression models of the actigraphic and self-reported sleep measures regressed on categorized commute time (short: 1-44 minutes; moderate: 45-89 minutes; long: ≥90 minutes) were built adjusting for relevant covariates. For associations that suggested a linear relationship, continuous commute time was modeled as the exposure. Moderation effects by age, sex, income, and depressive symptoms also were explored. RESULTS: Commute time was linearly related to sleep duration on work days such that each additional hour of commute time conferred 15 minutes of sleep loss (p=0.01). Compared with short commutes, individuals with moderate commutes had greater sleep duration variability (p=0.04) and lower interdaily stability (p=0.046, a measure of sleep/wake schedule regularity). No significant associations were detected for self-reported sleep measures. CONCLUSIONS: Commute time is significantly associated with actigraphy-measured sleep duration and regularity among Hispanic/Latino adults. Interventions to shorten commute times should be evaluated to help improve sleep habits in this minority population.

4 Article Neighborhood Factors as Predictors of Poor Sleep in the Sueño Ancillary Study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. 2017

Simonelli, Guido / Dudley, Katherine A / Weng, Jia / Gallo, Linda C / Perreira, Krista / Shah, Neomi A / Alcantara, Carmela / Zee, Phyllis C / Ramos, Alberto R / Llabre, Maria M / Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela / Wang, Rui / Patel, Sanjay R. ·Behavioral Biology Branch, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, MD. · Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA. · Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA. · Department of Psychology San Diego State University, San Diego, CA. · Department of Public Policy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC. · Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY. · School of Social Work, Columbia University, New York, NY. · Center for Circadian and Sleep Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Evanston, IL. · Department of Neurology, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL. · Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL. · Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center, Department of Biostatistics, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC. · Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. ·Sleep · Pubmed #28364454.

ABSTRACT: Study Objectives: To evaluate whether an adverse neighborhood environment has higher prevalence of poor sleep in a US Hispanic/Latino population. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis was performed in 2156 US Hispanic/Latino participants aged 18-64 years from the Sueño ancillary study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). Participants completed surveys of neighborhood environment including perceived safety, violence and noise, the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), and 7 days of wrist actigraphy. Results: In age and sex-adjusted analyses, short sleep, low sleep efficiency, and late sleep midpoint were all more prevalent among those living in an unsafe neighborhood. After adjustment for background, site, nativity, income, employment, depressive symptoms, and sleep apnea, the absolute risk of sleeping <6 hours was 7.7 (95% CI [0.9, 14.6]) percentage points greater in those living in an unsafe compared to a safe neighborhood. There were no differences in the prevalence of insomnia by level of safety or violence. Insomnia was more prevalent among those living in a noisy neighborhood. In adjusted analysis, the absolute risk of insomnia was 4.4 (95% CI [0.4, 8.4]) percentage points greater in those living in noisy compared to non-noisy neighborhoods. Conclusion: Using validated measures of sleep duration and insomnia, we have demonstrated the existence of a higher prevalence of short sleep and insomnia by adverse neighborhood factors. An adverse neighborhood environment is an established risk factor for a variety of poor health outcomes. Our findings suggest negative effects on sleep may represent one pathway by which neighborhood environment influences health.

5 Article Insomnia in female nurses: a nationwide retrospective study. 2017

Tsai, Kasumi / Lee, Tzu-Yin / Chung, Min-Huey. ·a Department of Mathematics & Statistics , San Diego State University , USA. · b College of Nursing , Taipei Medical University , Taiwan. ·Int J Occup Saf Ergon · Pubmed #27846774.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This study explored the incidence of insomnia in female nursing staff and compared the incidence with that in other medical and nonmedical female workers. METHODS: This retrospective study analyzed female nurses with insomnia using data from January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2008. The incidence of insomnia in other female medical workers and nonmedical female workers was also analyzed and compared with that of the nurses. Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, each study patient was identified by ID number. The incidence and rate ratio of insomnia were calculated according to their outpatient claims. RESULTS: Compared with other medical and nonmedical female workers, female nurses had higher incidences of adjustment insomnia and psychophysiological insomnia. However, female nurses had a lower incidence of nonorganic insomnia than did other female medical personnel. Older participants and those with the comorbidities of depressive and respiratory disorders had a higher risk of insomnia than did younger participants and those with other comorbidities. CONCLUSION: We suggest that nurses should be encouraged to relax in order to facilitate stress relief and improve their quality of sleep.

6 Article Joint associations of insomnia and sleep duration with prevalent diabetes: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). 2016

Cespedes, Elizabeth M / Dudley, Katherine A / Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela / Zee, Phyllis C / Daviglus, Martha L / Shah, Neomi A / Talavera, Gregory A / Gallo, Linda C / Mattei, Josiemer / Qi, Qibin / Ramos, Alberto R / Schneiderman, Neil / Espinoza-Giacinto, Rebeca A / Patel, Sanjay R. ·Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · Institute for Minority Health Research, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA. · Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York, USA. · Division of Health Promotion and Behavioral Science, Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, California, USA. · Departments of Psychology, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA. · Department of Neurology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA. · Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida, USA. · Medicine, Division of Global Public Health, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California, USA. ·J Diabetes · Pubmed #25952169.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Inadequate sleep quantity and quality are associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. This relationship is not well-examined in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos, and prior analyses may be confounded by sleep apnea. This cross-sectional study examined joint associations of sleep duration and insomnia with diabetes among diverse U.S. Hispanic/Latinos. METHODS: Baseline data on sleep quantity and quality were obtained from 15,227 participants (mean age 41; range 18-74 years) from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Complex survey multinomial logistic regression was used to examine associations between prevalent diabetes and six phenotypes defined by cross-classifying sleep duration (short ≤6 h, average >6-9 h, long >9 h) and insomnia, adjusting for sex, age, site and Hispanic/Latino background interaction, education, physical activity, diet quality, and sleep apnea. RESULTS: In the weighted population, 14% had diabetes, 28% had insomnia, 9% were short sleepers, and 19% were long sleepers. Compared with those with average sleep and no insomnia, those with short sleep and insomnia were more likely to have diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 1.46; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02, 2.11). Average sleepers with insomnia (1.28; 95% CI 1.02, 1.61) and long sleepers without insomnia (1.33; 95% CI 1.07, 1.65) also had elevated odds of diabetes. Further adjustment for body mass index attenuated associations, except with long sleep without insomnia. CONCLUSIONS: Both decreased quantity and quality of sleep are associated with diabetes in Hispanic/Latinos, with the greatest odds among those with short sleep duration and insomnia. The association is largely explained by obesity.

7 Article Sleep variability in military-related PTSD: a comparison to primary insomnia and healthy controls. 2015

Straus, Laura D / Drummond, Sean P A / Nappi, Carla M / Jenkins, Melissa M / Norman, Sonya B. ·San Diego State University/University of California San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology, San Diego, California, USA; Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System, Research Service, San Diego, California, USA. ·J Trauma Stress · Pubmed #25630526.

ABSTRACT: Sleep disturbances are prevalent in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and are associated with a number of adverse health consequences. Few studies have used comprehensive assessment methods to characterize sleep in Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation New Dawn (OEF/OIF/OND) veterans with PTSD. OEF/OIF/OND veterans with PTSD and sleep disturbance (n = 45) were compared to patients with primary insomnia (n = 25) and healthy control subjects (n = 27). Participants were assessed using questionnaire-based measures as well as daily subjective and objective measures of sleep. The 3 groups were compared with regard to (a) group means, (b) intraindividual (i.e., night-to-night) variability of sleep, and (c) interindividual (i.e., within-group) variability of sleep. In terms of group means, only objective sleep efficiency was significantly worse with PTSD than with primary insomnia (d = 0.54). Those with PTSD differed from those with primary insomnia on measures of intraindividual as well as interindividual variability (d = 0.48-0.73). These results suggested sleep symptoms in OEF/OIF/OND veterans with PTSD are more variable across nights and less consistent across patients relative to sleep symptoms in insomnia patients without PTSD. These findings have implications for research, as well as for personalizing treatment for individuals with PTSD.