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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles from RAND Corporation
Based on 3 articles published since 2008
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These are the 3 published articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders that originated from RAND Corporation during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Going direct to the consumer: Examining treatment preferences for veterans with insomnia, PTSD, and depression. 2018

Gutner, Cassidy A / Pedersen, Eric R / Drummond, Sean P A. ·National Center for PTSD Women's Health Sciences Division, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA; Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: cgutner@bu.edu. · RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, CA, USA. · Monash Institute for Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience, School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Australia. ·Psychiatry Res · Pubmed #29524908.

ABSTRACT: Inclusion of consumer preferences to disseminate evidence-based psychosocial treatment (EBPT) is crucial to effectively bridge the science-to-practice quality chasm. We examined this treatment gap for insomnia, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and comorbid symptoms in a sample of 622 young adult veterans through preference in symptom focus, treatment modality, and related gender differences among those screening positive for each problem. Data were collected from veteran drinkers recruited through targeted Facebook advertisements as part of a brief online alcohol intervention. Analyses demonstrated that veterans reported greater willingness to seek insomnia-focused treatment over PTSD- or depression-focused care. Notably, even when participants screened negative for insomnia, they preferred sleep-focused care to PTSD- or depression-focused care. Although one in five veterans with a positive screen would not consider care, veterans screening for both insomnia and PTSD who would consider care had a preference for in-person counseling, and those screening for both insomnia and depression had similar preferences for in-person and mobile app-based/computer self-help treatment. Marginal gender differences were found. Incorporating direct-to-consumer methods into research can help educate stakeholders about methods to expand EBPT access. Though traditional in-person counseling was often preferred, openness to app-based/computer interventions offers alternative methods to provide veterans with EBPTs.

2 Article Insomnia moderates the association between alcohol use and consequences among young adult veterans. 2017

Miller, Mary Beth / DiBello, Angelo M / Carey, Kate B / Pedersen, Eric R. ·Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Brown University School of Public Health, Box G-S121-5, Providence, RI 02912, USA. Electronic address: mary_miller@brown.edu. · Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Brown University School of Public Health, Box G-S121-5, Providence, RI 02912, USA. Electronic address: angelo_dibello@brown.edu. · Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Brown University School of Public Health, Box G-S121-5, Providence, RI 02912, USA. Electronic address: kate_carey@brown.edu. · RAND Corporation, 1776 Main St, Santa Monica, CA 90407, USA. Electronic address: ericp@rand.org. ·Addict Behav · Pubmed #28704711.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Symptoms of insomnia and heavy alcohol use tend to co-occur among military and veteran samples. The current study examined insomnia as a moderator of the association between alcohol use and related consequences among young adult veterans in an effort to extend and replicate findings observed in samples of civilian young adults. METHOD: Young adult veterans (N=622; 83% male; age M=29.0, SD=3.4) reporting alcohol use in the past year completed measures of insomnia severity, alcohol use, and alcohol-related consequences as part of a larger intervention trial. Participants were classified as screening 'positive' (n=383, 62%) or 'negative' (n=239, 38%) for insomnia using the Insomnia Severity Index. Hierarchical regression was used to examine the interaction between drinking quantity and insomnia on alcohol-related consequences. Predictor and outcome variables were measured concurrently. RESULTS: Both a greater number of drinks per week and a positive insomnia screen were associated with more alcohol-related consequences. Drinks per week and insomnia screen interacted to predict alcohol-related consequences, such that the effect of drinking on alcohol-related consequences was stronger in the context of a positive versus negative insomnia screen. CONCLUSION: Drinking is associated with more alcohol-related consequences in the presence of clinically significant insomnia symptoms. These findings replicate those documented in civilian young adults and indicate that insomnia may be an appropriate target for alcohol prevention and intervention efforts among young adult veterans.

3 Article Insomnia severity as a mediator of the association between mental health symptoms and alcohol use in young adult veterans. 2017

Miller, Mary Beth / DiBello, Angelo M / Carey, Kate B / Borsari, Brian / Pedersen, Eric R. ·Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Brown University School of Public Health, Box G-S121-5, Providence, RI 02912, USA. Electronic address: millerme04@gmail.com. · Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Brown University School of Public Health, Box G-S121-5, Providence, RI 02912, USA. Electronic address: angelo_dibello@brown.edu. · Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Brown University School of Public Health, Box G-S121-5, Providence, RI 02912, USA. Electronic address: kate_carey@brown.edu. · Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Brown University School of Public Health, Box G-S121-5, Providence, RI 02912, USA; San Francisco Veterans Affairs Health Care System, 4150 Clement Street, San Francisco, CA 94121, USA; University of California, 505 Parnassus Ave., San Francisco, CA 94143, USA. Electronic address: brian.borsari@va.gov. · RAND Corporation, 1776 Main St., Santa Monica, CA 90407, USA. Electronic address: ericp@rand.org. ·Drug Alcohol Depend · Pubmed #28618286.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Prior research has documented associations between mental health and alcohol use, mental health and insomnia, and insomnia and alcohol use. This study examined insomnia severity as a mediator of the association between mental health and alcohol-related outcomes in young adult veterans. PROCEDURES: Veterans aged 18-34 years (N=622, 83% male) who reported drinking in the past year completed assessments at baseline and one-month follow-up as part of a larger intervention trial. Participants reported symptoms of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at baseline, insomnia severity at one month, and alcohol use and related consequences at baseline and one month. Mediation analyses using bootstrapped confidence intervals were used to examine the indirect effects of baseline mental health symptoms on alcohol-related outcomes at one month via insomnia severity. MAIN FINDINGS: Insomnia severity was associated with both drinking quantity and alcohol-related consequences. Greater depressive (but not PTSD) symptoms were associated directly with more alcohol-related consequences. Neither depressive nor PTSD symptoms had direct effects on drinking quantity when controlling for the other mental health symptoms (e.g., depressive symptoms did not predict drinking quantity when controlling for symptoms of PTSD). However, symptoms of depression and PTSD predicted drinks per week and alcohol-related consequences indirectly through insomnia severity. CONCLUSIONS: Symptoms of depression and PTSD increase risk for alcohol use and related consequences in part by increasing symptoms of insomnia. Findings suggest that insomnia may be an appropriate target for prevention and intervention efforts among heavy-drinking Veterans reporting symptoms of depression or PTSD.