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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles by Yu-Tao Xiang
Based on 13 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Yu-Tao Xiang wrote the following 13 articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Gender and Regional Differences in Sleep Quality and Insomnia: A General Population-based Study in Hunan Province of China. 2017

Tang, Jinsong / Liao, Yanhui / Kelly, Brian C / Xie, Liqin / Xiang, Yu-Tao / Qi, Chang / Pan, Chen / Hao, Wei / Liu, Tieqiao / Zhang, Fengyu / Chen, Xiaogang. ·Department of Psychiatry &Mental Health Institute of the Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University. National Clinical Research Center on Mental Disorders &National Technology Institute on Mental Disorders. Hunan Key Laboratory of Psychiatry and Mental Health, 139 Renmin (M) Rd, Changsha, Hunan 410011, P. R. China. · Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA, 760 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. · Department of Sociology &Center for Research on Young People's Health (CRYPH), Purdue University, 700 W State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA. · Changsha Social Work College, 22 Xiangzhang Rd, Yuhua, Changsha, Hunan, 410116, P. R. China. · Unit of Psychiatry, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau, Avenida da Universidade, 3/F, Building E12, Macau SAR, Taipa, P. R. China. · Clinical Psychology Department, the Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410013, China. ·Sci Rep · Pubmed #28262807.

ABSTRACT: Insomnia and the inability to sleep affect people's health and well-being. However, its systematic estimates of prevalence and distribution in the general population in China are still lacking. A population-based cluster sampling survey was conducted in the rural and urban areas of Hunan, China. Subjects (n = 26,851) were sampled from the general population, with a follow-up using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) for interview to assess quality of sleep and Insomnia (PSQI score >5). While the overall prevalence of insomnia was 26.6%, and little difference was found between males (26.3%) and females (27.0%); the mean PSQI score was 4.26 (±2.67), and significant higher in females (4.32 ± 2.70) than males (4.21 ± 2.64, p = 0.003). Individuals in the rural areas tended to report a higher PSQI score (4.45 ± 2.81) than urban residents did (4.18 ± 2.60) (p < 0.001) and the estimates of prevalence of insomnia was 29.4% in the rural areas, significant higher than 25.5% in the urban areas (p < 0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that female gender, older age, higher level of education, being unmarried, living in the rural area, cigarette smoking and alcohol drinking were associated with insomnia. Our study may provide important information for general and mental health research.

2 Article The prevalence of insomnia in the general population in China: A meta-analysis. 2017

Cao, Xiao-Lan / Wang, Shi-Bin / Zhong, Bao-Liang / Zhang, Ling / Ungvari, Gabor S / Ng, Chee H / Li, Lu / Chiu, Helen F K / Lok, Grace K I / Lu, Jian-Ping / Jia, Fu-Jun / Xiang, Yu-Tao. ·Shenzhen Key Laboratory for Psychological Healthcare & Shenzhen Institute of Mental Health, Shenzhen Kangning Hospital & Shenzhen Mental Health Center, Shenzhen, China. · Faculty of Mental health, Shenzhen University, Guangdong province, China. · Unit of Psychiatry, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau, Macao SAR, China. · The Affiliated Mental Health Center, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science & Technology, Wuhan, China. · The National Clinical Research Center for Mental Disorders, China & Center of Depression, Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders & Mood Disorders Center, Beijing Anding Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China. · The University of Notre Dame Australia/Marian Centre, Perth, Australia. · School of Psychiatry & Clinical Neurosciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Psychiatry, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China. · Kiang Wu Nursing College of Macau, Macao SRA, China. · Guangdong Mental Health Center, Guangdong General Hospital & Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangdong Province, China. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #28234940.

ABSTRACT: This is the first meta-analysis of the pooled prevalence of insomnia in the general population of China. A systematic literature search was conducted via the following databases: PubMed, PsycINFO, EMBASE and Chinese databases (China National Knowledge Interne (CNKI), WanFang Data and SinoMed). Statistical analyses were performed using the Comprehensive Meta-Analysis program. A total of 17 studies with 115,988 participants met the inclusion criteria for the analysis. The pooled prevalence of insomnia in China was 15.0% (95% Confidence interval [CI]: 12.1%-18.5%). No significant difference was found in the prevalence between genders or across time period. The pooled prevalence of insomnia in population with a mean age of 43.7 years and older (11.6%; 95% CI: 7.5%-17.6%) was significantly lower than in those with a mean age younger than 43.7 years (20.4%; 95% CI: 14.2%-28.2%). The prevalence of insomnia was significantly affected by the type of assessment tools (Q = 14.1, P = 0.001). The general population prevalence of insomnia in China is lower than those reported in Western countries but similar to those in Asian countries. Younger Chinese adults appear to suffer from more insomnia than older adults. TRIAL REGISTRATION: CRD 42016043620.

3 Article Quality of life and clinical correlates in older adults living in the community and in nursing homes in Macao. 2017

C F Kuok, Kenny / Li, Lu / Xiang, Yu-Tao / Nogueira, Bernice O C Lam / Ungvari, Gabor S / Ng, Chee H / Chiu, Helen F K / Tran, Linda / Meng, Li-Rong. ·School of Health Sciences, Macao Polytechnic Institute, Macao SAR, China. · Unit of Psychiatry, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau, Macao SAR, China. · Macao Sino-Portuguese Nurses Association, „, Macao SAR, China. · School of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, „, Australia. · University of Notre Dame Australia/Marian Centre, „, Perth, „, Australia. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Psychiatry, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China, „. ·Psychogeriatrics · Pubmed #28093847.

ABSTRACT: AIM: There have been no previous studies of quality of life (QOL) in older adults in Macao. This study aimed to examine QOL in relation to the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of adults aged ≥50 years in Macao. METHODS: A sample of 451 subjects (203 living in the community, 248 living in nursing homes) was interviewed using standardized instruments. Basic sociodemographic and clinical data including QOL were collected. RESULT: There were no significant differences between the community and nursing home groups in any of the QOL domains. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed that poor physical QOL was significantly predicted by severe depressive symptoms, insomnia, major medical conditions, unmarried status, and lower education ( F CONCLUSION: Older Macanese adults had poorer scores on physical and social QOL domains than the general Hong Kong Chinese population. Their QOL was more strongly related to severe depressive symptoms, major medical conditions, and insomnia.

4 Article Suicidal ideation at 1-year post-stroke: A nationwide survey in China. 2017

Yang, Yang / Shi, Yu-Zhi / Zhang, Ning / Wang, Shuo / Ungvari, Gabor S / Ng, Chee H / Wang, Yi-Long / Zhao, Xing-Quan / Wang, Yong-Jun / Wang, Chun-Xue / Xiang, Yu-Tao. ·Department of Neurology, Beijing Tian Tan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China; Department of Neuropsychiatry & Behavioral Neurology and Clinical Psychology, Beijing Tian Tan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China; China National Clinical Research Center for Neurological Diseases, Beijing, China; Center of Stroke, Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Beijing, China; Beijing Key Laboratory of Translational Medicine for Cerebrovascular Disease, Beijing, China. · Department of Neurology, Beijing Tian Tan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China; China National Clinical Research Center for Neurological Diseases, Beijing, China; Center of Stroke, Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Beijing, China; Beijing Key Laboratory of Translational Medicine for Cerebrovascular Disease, Beijing, China. · University of Notre Dame Australia/Marian Centre, Perth, Australia; School of Psychiatry & Clinical Neurosciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Neurology, Beijing Tian Tan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China; Department of Neuropsychiatry & Behavioral Neurology and Clinical Psychology, Beijing Tian Tan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China; China National Clinical Research Center for Neurological Diseases, Beijing, China; Center of Stroke, Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Beijing, China; Beijing Key Laboratory of Translational Medicine for Cerebrovascular Disease, Beijing, China. Electronic address: snowsen@126.com. · Unit of Psychiatry, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau, Macao SAR, China. Electronic address: xyutly@gmail.com. ·Gen Hosp Psychiatry · Pubmed #28041574.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Few studies on suicidal ideation have been conducted in post-stroke patients in China. This national study examined suicidal ideation at 1-year post-stroke and explored its demographic and clinical correlates. METHODS: A total of 1418 patients with ischemic stroke were included in 56 hospitals nationwide. Demographic, clinical characteristics and neuro-imaging information were collected with standardized instruments, including assessment of stroke severity, depression, cognitive impairment, stroke recurrence, physical disability and insomnia. Suicidal ideation was measured using item 3 of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. RESULTS: The frequency of suicidal ideation in this study was 6.6%. Multivariate analyses revealed that disability (OR=2.07, 95% CI=1.09-3.05), stroke recurrence (OR=4.13, 95% CI=1.74-9.77) and insomnia early (OR=1.87, 95% CI=1.03-3.39), middle (OR=2.66, 95% CI=1.46-4.85) and late (OR=2.35, 95% CI=1.31-4.19) at the 1-year follow-up and post-stroke depression (OR=2.16, 95% CI=1.23-3.82) were significantly associated with post-stroke suicidal ideation. CONCLUSION: Post-stroke depression, disability, insomnia and stroke recurrence are possible risk factors of suicidal ideation that warrant attention in clinical practice.

5 Article Insomnia in Adults With Chronic Hepatitis B, Liver Failure, and Cirrhosis: A Case-Control Study. 2017

Guo, Hui-Min / Liu, Mei / Xiang, Yu-Tao / Zhao, Jing / Ungvari, Gabor S / Correll, Christoph U / Ng, Chee H / Chiu, Helen F K / Duan, Zhong-Ping. ·Artificial Liver Treatment and Training Center, Beijing YouAn Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China. · Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau, Macao, SAR, China. · The University of Notre Dame Australia/Marian Centre, Perth, Australia. · Division of Psychiatry Research, The Zucker Hillside Hospital, North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, Glen Oaks, New York, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Psychiatry, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, SAR, China. ·Perspect Psychiatr Care · Pubmed #26633859.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To determine the frequency and socio-demographic/clinical correlates of insomnia in patients with chronic hepatitis B, hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related liver failure, and cirrhosis. DESIGN AND METHODS: Up to 120 patients with HBV-related diseases and 40 matched healthy controls were recruited. Depressive and anxiety symptoms, early, middle, and late insomnia were measured. FINDINGS: The frequency of ≥1 type of insomnia was 64.2% in patients and 35.0% in controls; frequencies of early, middle, and late insomnia in patients were 39.2%, 42.5%, and 48.3%, respectively, compared to 22.5%, 10.0%, and 25.0% in controls. Urban residency was independently associated with less insomnia of any type, accounting for 22.6% of the variance. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: A considerable proportion of patients with HBV-related diseases suffer from insomnia that warrants more attention in clinical practice.

6 Article Prevalence of Insomnia and Clinical and Quality of Life Correlates in Chinese Patients With Schizophrenia Treated in Primary Care. 2017

Hou, Cai-Lan / Li, Yan / Cai, Mei-Ying / Ma, Xin-Rong / Zang, Yu / Jia, Fu-Jun / Lin, Yong-Qiang / Ungvari, Gabor S / Chiu, Helen F K / Ng, Chee H / Zhong, Bao-Liang / Cao, Xiao-Lan / Tam, Man-Ian / Xiang, Yu-Tao. ·Guangdong Mental Health Center, Guangdong General Hospital & Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China. · Department of Psychiatry, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China. · Department of Community, Guangzhou Yuexiu Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China. · Ningxia Mental Health Center, Ningxia Ning-An Hospital, Yinchuan, Ningxia Province, China. · Shenzhen Key Laboratory for Psychological Healthcare & Shenzhen Institute of Mental Health, Shenzhen Kangning Hospital & Shenzhen Mental Health Center, Shenzhen, China. · Marian Centre, The University of Notre Dame Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. · School of Psychiatry & Clinical Neurosciences, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Psychiatry, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Guangzhou, Hong Kong SAR, China. · Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau, Taipa, Macao SAR, China. ·Perspect Psychiatr Care · Pubmed #26388498.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To describe the prevalence and clinical correlates of insomnia in schizophrenia patients treated in primary care. DESIGN AND METHODS: Six hundred and twenty-three schizophrenia patients from 22 primary care services were recruited. FINDINGS: The prevalence of at least one type of insomnia was 28.9% (180/623), while those of difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, and early morning wakening were 20.5%, 19.6%, and 17.7%, respectively. Only 53.3% of patients suffering from insomnia received treatment. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Insomnia is common in Chinese patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care and the rate of treatment appears low.

7 Article The Prevalence of Insomnia, Its Demographic Correlates, and Treatment in Nurses Working in Chinese Psychiatric and General Hospitals. 2016

An, Feng-Rong / Qi, Yun-Ke / Zeng, Jiao-Ying / Ding, Yan-Ming / Chiu, Helen F K / Ungvari, Gabor S / Newhouse, Robin / Yu, Doris S F / Lai, Kelly Y C / Xiang, Yu-Tao. ·Beijing Anding Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China. · Shenzhen Mental Health Centre, Shenzhen Key Lab for Psychological Healthcare, Shenzhen Kangning Hospital, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China. · First Hospital of Peking University, Peking University, Beijing, China. · Department of Psychiatry, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. · University of Notre Dame Australia/Marian Centre, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. · University of Maryland School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · The Nethersole School of Nursing, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. · Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau, Macao, China. ·Perspect Psychiatr Care · Pubmed #25639858.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To determine the prevalence of insomnia and its socio-demographic correlates in Chinese nurses. DESIGN AND METHODS: Up to 799 nurses were examined. Demographic data, total sleep time (TST), and insomnia were collected. FINDINGS: The mean expected and actual TST were 8.3 ± 1.5 and 6.1 ± 1.1 hr, respectively. The prevalence of at least one type of reported sleep disturbance was 69.7%; the rates of difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, and early morning awakening were 54.6%, 54.7%, and 55.9%, respectively. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: There is a large discrepancy of actual and expected sleep duration, and insomnia is common among nurses in China.

8 Article Country variations in depressive symptoms profile in Asian countries: Findings of the Research on Asia Psychotropic Prescription (REAP) studies. 2015

Chee, Kok-Yoon / Tripathi, Adarsh / Avasthi, Ajit / Chong, Mian-Yoon / Xiang, Yu-Tao / Sim, Kang / Si, Tian-Mei / Kanba, Shigenobu / He, Yan-Ling / Lee, Min-Soo / Fung-Kum Chiu, Helen / Yang, Shu-Yu / Kuga, Hironori / Udormatn, Pichet / Kallivayalil, Roy A / Tanra, Andi J / Maramis, Margarita / Grover, Sandeep / Chin, Loi-Fei / Dahlan, Rahima / Mohamad Isa, Mohd Fadzli / Ebenezer, Esther Gunaseli M / Nordin, Norhayati / Shen, Winston W / Shinfuku, Naotaka / Tan, Chay-Hoon / Sartorius, Norman. ·Department of Psychiatry & Mental Health, Kuala Lumpur Hospital, Kuala Lumpur, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Psychiatry, King George's Medical University, Chowk, Lucknow, India. · Department of Psychiatry, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India. · Department of Psychiatry, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Kaohsiung Medical Center and School of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taiwan. · Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau, Macao SAR, China. · Institute of Mental Health, Buangkok View, Buangkok Green Medical Park, Singapore. · Department of Psychiatry, Peking University Institute of Mental Health, Beijing, China. · Department of Neuropsychiatry, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan. · Department of Psychiatric Epidemiology, Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai, China. · Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Psychiatry, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. · Department of Pharmacy, Taipei City Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, Thailand. · Department of Psychiatry, Pushpagiri Medical College, Thiruvalla, India. · Department of Psychiatry, Hasanuddin University Faculty of Medicine, Makassar, Sulawesi Selatan, Indonesia. · Dr. Soetomo Hospital - Faculty of Medicine, Airlangga University, Jawa Timur, Indonesia. · Department of Psychiatry & Mental Health, Tengku Ampuan Rahimah Hospital, Selangor, Malaysia. · Department of Psychiatry & Mental Health, Kajang Hospital, Selangor, Malaysia. · Department of Psychiatry & Mental Health, Sultan Abdul Halim Hospital, Kedah, Malaysia. · Department of Psychiatry, Universiti Kuala Lumpur Royal College of Medicine, Perak, Malaysia. · Mesra Hospital, Sabah, Malaysia. · Departments of Psychiatry, TMU-Wan Fang Medical Center and School of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan. · Department of Psychiatry, Kobe University, Kobe, Japan. · Department of Pharmacology, National University of Singapore, Singapore. · Association for the Improvement of Mental Health Programmes, Geneva, Switzerland. ·Asia Pac Psychiatry · Pubmed #25641910.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: This study was to assess differences in the symptom profile of depressive illness across various countries/territories in Asia. The study was a part of the Research on Asia Psychotropic Prescription project. The participating countries/territories include China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan, and Thailand. METHODS: The pattern of depressive symptoms in 1,400 subjects with depressive disorder from 42 psychiatric centers in 10 Asian countries/territories was assessed. We collected information on socio-demographic and clinical characteristics with a standardized protocol and data collection procedure. RESULTS: The most common presentations of depressive symptoms were persistent sadness, loss of interest, and insomnia. Similar findings were found regardless of the region, country, or its income level. Patients with depressive disorder from high-income countries presented significantly more with vegetative symptom cluster (P < 0.05), while those from the upper middle-income countries had significantly more with both mood (P < 0.001) and cognitive symptom clusters (P < 0.01). In lower middle-income countries, patients with depressive symptoms had significantly less mood symptom cluster (P < 0.001) but significantly more cognitive symptom cluster (P < 0.05). DISCUSSION: This study demonstrates that in Asia, despite variations in the initial symptom reported by the patients, across different countries/territories, core depressive symptoms remain the same. Variations have been found in presentation of depressive symptoms with regards to the level of income of countries. Physical or vegetative symptoms were reported more by centers in higher income countries, while depressive cognition and suicidal thoughts/acts were more frequently reported from lower income countries.

9 Article Insomnia in older adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Hong Kong: a case-control study. 2014

Xiang, Yu-Tao / Wong, Tak-Shun / Tsoh, Joshua / Ungvari, Gabor S / Correll, Christoph U / Ko, Fanny W S / Hui, David S C / Chiu, Helen F K. ·1Department of Psychiatry, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. ·COPD · Pubmed #24378014.

ABSTRACT: This study aimed to determine the frequency and sociodemographic/clinical correlates of insomnia in Chinese patients aged ≥60 years suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In this case-control study of 142 outpatients with COPD and 218 sex- and age-matched control subjects, COPD patients were recruited from a prospective study sample hospitalized in Hong Kong for acute COPD exacerbation (≥2 major COPD symptoms or >1 major+minor COPD symptoms for ≥2 consecutive days). Controls were recruited from social centres in Hong Kong. Activity of daily living was assessed with the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale, life events were evaluated using the Life Event Scale, depressive symptoms were ascertained with the Geriatric Depression Scale, and quality of life was measured using the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-12. Early, middle and late insomnia were measured using items 4, 5 and 6 of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. The frequency of ≥1 type of insomnia was 47.2% in patients and 25.7% in controls; frequencies of early, middle and late insomnia in patients were 24.6%, 31.0%, and 26.1%, respectively, compared to 14.7%, 14.7% and 11.9% in controls. Group differences were non-significant after controlling for relevant covariates. However, in multiple logistic regression analysis, more physical illnesses (p = 0.02, OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.1-1.7) and more severe depressive symptoms (p = 0.009, OR = 1.1, 95% CI = 1.03-1.3) were independently associated with any type of insomnia in COPD patients, accounting for 21.3% of the variance. A significant proportion of older adult Chinese COPD patients suffer from insomnia that warrants more attention in clinical practice.

10 Article The prevalence of insomnia and its socio-demographic and clinical correlates in older adults in rural China: a pilot study. 2013

Dai, Jing / Chiu, Helen F K / Xiang, Yu-Tao / Chan, Sandra S M / Yu, Xin / Hou, Zai-Jin / Ungvari, Gabor S / Caine, Eric D. ·Shenzhen Institute of Mental Health, Shenzhen Kangning Hospital, Shenzhen Mental Health Center, Shenzhen, China. ·Aging Ment Health · Pubmed #23547946.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prevalence of insomnia (DIS: difficulty initiating sleep; DMS: difficulty maintaining sleep; and EMA: early morning awakening), its socio-demographic and clinical correlates, and the treatment patterns in older adults in rural China. METHOD: A sample of 263 subjects was recruited in Mianyang and interviewed using standardized instruments. Basic socio-demographic and clinical data were collected. RESULTS: The expected mean total sleep time (TST) of the whole sample was 6.8 ± 2.2 hours, and the actual mean TST was 6.3 ± 2.1 hours. The 1-year prevalence of at least one type of insomnia was 7.6%; the rates of DIS, DMS, and EMA were 5.7%, 7.2%, and 6.8%, respectively. On multivariate analyses, female sex and psychiatric disorders were independently associated with more frequent insomnia. CONCLUSION: Insomnia is not uncommon in older adults in rural China, and the low percentage of subjects treated suggests that improved access to treatment might be indicated.

11 Article Relationships of sleep duration with sleep disturbances, basic socio-demographic factors, and BMI in Chinese people. 2009

Xiang, Yu-Tao / Ma, Xin / Lu, Jin-Yan / Cai, Zhuo-Ji / Li, Shu-Ran / Xiang, Ying-Qiang / Guo, Hong-Li / Hou, Ye-Zhi / Li, Zhen-Bo / Li, Zhan-Jiang / Tao, Yu-Fen / Dang, Wei-Min / Wu, Xiao-Mei / Deng, Jing / Lai, Kelly Y C / Ungvari, Gabor S. ·Beijing Anding Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China. xyutly@cuhk.edu.hk ·Sleep Med · Pubmed #19442580.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This study aimed at determining the mean total sleep time (TST) and the relationship between sleep duration and basic socio-demographic factors and BMI sleep problems in Chinese subjects. METHOD: A total of 5926 subjects were randomly selected and interviewed using standardized assessment tools. RESULTS: The reported mean TST was 7.76 h. Short sleepers were significantly older than medium and long sleepers. There were more urban residents who were short sleepers than medium and long sleepers. Short sleepers reported more sleep problems than medium and long sleepers. Short and long sleepers reported more psychiatric disorders than medium sleepers in both sexes, and short sleepers also had more major medical conditions in women. Short sleepers had a lower BMI than medium and long sleepers after controlling for the effects of age and psychiatric disorders in women. CONCLUSIONS: Nationwide epidemiologic surveys in China are needed to further explore the relationship between sleep duration and sleep problems.

12 Article Prevalence and correlates of insomnia and its impact on quality of life in Chinese schizophrenia patients. 2009

Xiang, Yu-Tao / Weng, Yong-Zhen / Leung, Chi-Ming / Tang, Wai-Kwong / Lai, Kelly Y C / Ungvari, Gabor S. ·Department of Psychiatry, Chinese University ofHong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China, BeijingAnding Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China. xyutly@cuhk.edu.hk ·Sleep · Pubmed #19189785.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to determine the prevalence and the sociodemographic and clinical correlates of insomnia in Chinese schizophrenia outpatients and its impact on patients' quality of life (QOL). DESIGN: Two hundred fifty-five clinically stable schizophrenia outpatients were randomly selected in Hong Kong and their counterparts matched according to sex, age, age at onset, and length of illness were recruited in Beijing, China. All subjects at both sites were interviewed by the same investigator using standardized assessment instruments. SETTING: Hong Kong and Beijing, China. PATIENTS OR PARTICIPANTS: Clinically stable schizophrenia outpatients. INTERVENTIONS: N/A. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: In the combined Beijing-Hong Kong sample the frequency of at least one type of insomnia over the previous 12 months was 36.0%; the rates of difficulty initiating sleep (DIS), difficulty maintaining sleep (DMS), and early morning awakening (EMA) were 21.2%, 23.6%, and 11.9%, respectively. Poor sleep was significantly associated with advanced age, older age at onset, fewer psychiatric admissions, severity of positive symptoms, anxiety, extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) and depressive symptoms, less frequent use of atypical antipsychotic medications (AP), and more frequent use of benzodiazepines (BZD) and hypnotics. Poor sleepers had significantly poorer QOL in all domains than patients without insomnia. After controlling for the potential confounding effects of sociodemographic and clinical factors, a significant difference remained between the 2 groups with regard to the physical QOL domain. A multiple logistic regression analysis found that advanced age, fewer psychiatric admissions, severity of depressive symptoms and use of hypnotics were significant contributors to poor sleep. CONCLUSION: Insomnia is independently associated with poor QOL. More attention should be paid in clinical practice to the high rate of insomnia in Chinese schizophrenia patients.

13 Article The prevalence of insomnia, its sociodemographic and clinical correlates, and treatment in rural and urban regions of Beijing, China: a general population-based survey. 2008

Xiang, Yu-Tao / Ma, Xin / Cai, Zhuo-Ji / Li, Shu-Ran / Xiang, Ying-Qiang / Guo, Hong-Li / Hou, Ye-Zhi / Li, Zhen-Bo / Li, Zhan-Jiang / Tao, Yu-Fen / Dang, Wei-Min / Wu, Xiao-Mei / Deng, Jing / Lai, Kelly Y C / Ungvari, Gabor S. ·Beijing Anding Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China. xyutly@cuhk.edu.hk ·Sleep · Pubmed #19090321.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of insomnia, its sociodemographic and clinical correlates, and treatment patterns in Chinese people. DESIGN: A total of 5,926 subjects were randomly selected in the urban and rural areas of Beijing and interviewed using standardized assessment tools. Basic sociodemographic and clinical data were also collected. SETTING: Urban and rural regions of Beijing municipality, China. Patients or Participants Adult residents older than 15 years. Interventions N/A. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: The prevalence of at least one type of insomnia was 9.2%; the rates of difficulty initiating sleep (DIS), difficulty maintaining sleep (DMS), and early morning awakening (EMA) were 7.0%, 8.0%, and 4.9%, respectively. Increased age (age >44 and 24 years in the urban and rural samples, respectively), female sex, married, divorced, separated, or widowed marital status; having a major medical condition; and suffering from a psychiatric disorder were risk factors for all types of insomnia in both the urban and rural samples. A low level of education (primary school or illiteracy) was significantly associated with a higher likelihood of all types of insomnia in the urban sample. Current smokers and current drinkers were less likely to report any type of insomnia in the rural sample. Unemployment was associated with DMS in the urban sample, while it was associated with DIS and DMS in the rural sample. Only 5.4% of the participants with any type of insomnia reported their symptoms to medical practitioners. In contrast, nearly one-third of the subjects with insomnia reported taking benzodiazepines as sleep-enhancing drugs. CONCLUSIONS: Nationwide epidemiologic surveys are needed to further explore the prevalence of insomnia in China. The low percentage of subjects treated for insomnia indicates a major public health problem that should be addressed. Strict controls on use of benzodiazepines are warranted.