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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles by Shelly K. Weiss
Based on 9 articles published since 2009
(Why 9 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Shelly Weiss wrote the following 9 articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline A practice pathway for the identification, evaluation, and management of insomnia in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders. 2012

Malow, Beth A / Byars, Kelly / Johnson, Kyle / Weiss, Shelly / Bernal, Pilar / Goldman, Suzanne E / Panzer, Rebecca / Coury, Daniel L / Glaze, Dan G / Anonymous1500741. ·Departments of Neurology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. beth.malow@vanderbilt.edu ·Pediatrics · Pubmed #23118242.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This report describes the development of a practice pathway for the identification, evaluation, and management of insomnia in children and adolescents who have autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). METHODS: The Sleep Committee of the Autism Treatment Network (ATN) developed a practice pathway, based on expert consensus, to capture best practices for an overarching approach to insomnia by a general pediatrician, primary care provider, or autism medical specialist, including identification, evaluation, and management. A field test at 4 ATN sites was used to evaluate the pathway. In addition, a systematic literature review and grading of evidence provided data regarding treatments of insomnia in children who have neurodevelopmental disabilities. RESULTS: The literature review revealed that current treatments for insomnia in children who have ASD show promise for behavioral/educational interventions and melatonin trials. However, there is a paucity of evidence, supporting the need for additional research. Consensus among the ATN sleep medicine committee experts included: (1) all children who have ASD should be screened for insomnia; (2) screening should be done for potential contributing factors, including other medical problems; (3) the need for therapeutic intervention should be determined; (4) therapeutic interventions should begin with parent education in the use of behavioral approaches as a first-line approach; (5) pharmacologic therapy may be indicated in certain situations; and (6) there should be follow-up after any intervention to evaluate effectiveness and tolerance of the therapy. Field testing of the practice pathway by autism medical specialists allowed for refinement of the practice pathway. CONCLUSIONS: The insomnia practice pathway may help health care providers to identify and manage insomnia symptoms in children and adolescents who have ASD. It may also provide a framework to evaluate the impact of contributing factors on insomnia and to test the effectiveness of nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatment strategies for the nighttime symptoms and daytime functioning and quality of life in ASD.

2 Review A systematic review to explore the feasibility of a behavioural sleep intervention for insomnia in children with neurodevelopmental disorders: A transdiagnostic approach. 2018

Rigney, Gabrielle / Ali, Nicole S / Corkum, Penny V / Brown, Cary A / Constantin, Evelyn / Godbout, Roger / Hanlon-Dearman, Ana / Ipsiroglu, Osman / Reid, Graham J / Shea, Sarah / Smith, Isabel M / Van der Loos, Hendrik F M / Weiss, Shelly K. ·Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada. · Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada. Electronic address: penny.corkum@dal.ca. · University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. · McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. · Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada. · University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. · University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. · Western University, London, ON, Canada. · IWK Health Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada. · University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. ·Sleep Med Rev · Pubmed #29764710.

ABSTRACT: Children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDD) are at high risk for sleep problems, especially insomnia. It is currently not known whether behavioural sleep interventions developed for typically developing (TD) children are effective for children with NDD, and if interventions need to be modified for each diagnostic group. The aim of this systematic review was to identify and evaluate commonalities, trends in outcomes, and the methodological quality of parent-delivered behavioural sleep interventions for children with NDD, specifically Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Cerebral Palsy, and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder. Nine databases were searched. A total of 40 studies met eligibility criteria. The majority of studies were conducted with ASD and ADHD populations. Common sleep problems were evident across the NDD populations. The most frequently reported included bedtime resistance, night-waking, early morning awakening, and co-sleeping. The most common interventions used were implementation of healthy sleep practices, reinforcement, graduated extinction, and faded bedtime. All studies reported at least one behavioural treatment component as effective. Commonalities across NDD populations, as well as the TD population, for both sleep problems reported and behavioural interventions implemented, suggest the feasibility of developing a transdiagnostic behavioural sleep intervention suitable for children with a range of NDD.

3 Review Pharmacotherapy in pediatric sleep disorders. 2010

Weiss, Shelly K / Garbutt, Andrea. ·Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8, Canada. shelly.weiss@sickkids.ca ·Adolesc Med State Art Rev · Pubmed #21302858.

ABSTRACT: Sleep disorders are highly prevalent during childhood and adolescence. It is known that if left untreated, these problems can have significant impact on daytime function, including learning, memory, attention, and behavior. The approach to the treatment of these disorders (whether with or without pharmacotherapy) is dependent on a thorough evaluation of the sleep complaint and determination of an accurate diagnosis. Many pediatric sleep problems are due to insomnia. There is good evidence that young children with behaviorally based insomnia respond to appropriate behavioral interventions. There is less research evidence of the efficacy of these interventions in children who are either school age or adolescents; however, nonpharmacologic strategies are usually indicated initially in the approach to treatment. The indication for the use of pharmacotherapy in pediatric insomnia is not well understood; however, some general principles are described when medications may be considered. There are specific sleep disorders (other than insomnia) for which pharmacotherapy plus behavioral strategies are warranted. The research regarding pharmacotherapy in pediatric sleep disorders is limited; often, medications are used "off label" based on data extrapolated from adult studies. Clinicians who suggest over-the-counter treatments or prescribe medications for pediatric patients with sleep disorders should have an understanding of the classification of sleep disorders and the role of pharmacotherapy in the treatment of these disorders. In this chapter, the emphasis is on the pharmacologic treatment of sleep disorders in typically developing children and adolescents.

4 Article Optimizing an eHealth insomnia intervention for children with neurodevelopmental disorders: a Delphi study. 2018

Ali, Nicole / Rigney, Gabrielle / Weiss, Shelly K / Brown, Cary A / Constantin, Evelyn / Godbout, Roger / Hanlon-Dearman, Ana / Ipsiroglu, Osman / Reid, Graham J / Shea, Sarah / Smith, Isabel M / Van der Loos, Machiel / Corkum, Penny V. ·Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada. · University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. · McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. · Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada. · University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. · University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. · Western University, London, ON, Canada. · IWK Health Centre, Halifax, NS, Canada. · Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada. Electronic address: penny.corkum@dal.ca. ·Sleep Health · Pubmed #29555138.

ABSTRACT: Insomnia, which is related to daytime deficits and is a common problem for children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs), is often successfully treated with behavioral strategies. However, there are barriers to accessing these treatments, and there has been little research examining what these interventions need to be usable and effective. The goal of this study was to gain consensus from experts in the field on the key components of an eHealth, parent-implemented, intervention program aimed at improving sleep in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder, cerebral palsy, and fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. This was achieved using the Delphi method, which involves asking participants to respond to open-ended questions about a topic of interest and then, in iterative rounds, to rate the recommendations that were made by the group. In the current study, participants (27 responders in the first round, 21 in the second, and 18 in the third) rated a total of 131 recommendations. Of those 131 recommendations, 52 items had high importance and high consensus and were deemed to be priority items to consider for creating an eHealth, parent-delivered, behaviorally-based intervention for insomnia in children with NDD. Furthermore, 75% (n = 84) of the 112 recommendations from the first round were believed to be applicable across all 4 NDD groups, thus providing evidence of the potential for a transdiagnostic intervention.

5 Article The Pediatric Sleep Clinical Global Impressions Scale-A New Tool to Measure Pediatric Insomnia in Autism Spectrum Disorders. 2016

Malow, Beth A / Connolly, Heidi V / Weiss, Shelly K / Halbower, Ann / Goldman, Suzanne / Hyman, Susan L / Katz, Terry / Madduri, Niru / Shui, Amy / Macklin, Eric / Reynolds, Ann M. ·*Sleep Disorders Division, Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN; †Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY; ‡Department of Neurology, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON; §Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO; ‖Biostatistics Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. ·J Dev Behav Pediatr · Pubmed #27244298.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To pilot a clinician-based outcome measure that provides complementary information to objective measures and parent-based questionnaires for insomnia in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). METHOD: The authors developed a Pediatric Sleep Clinical Global Impressions Scale (CGI). Questions included (1) the child's ability to fall asleep and remain sleeping independently (i.e., apart from parents); (2) bedtime resistance; (3) sleep onset delay; (4) night awakening; (5) parental satisfaction with their child's current sleep patterns; (6) family functioning as affected by their child's current sleep patterns; and (7) clinician's overall concern with the child's sleep. After refining the instrument through the evaluation of vignettes by ASD and sleep experts, the authors piloted the Pediatric Sleep CGI in a 12-week randomized trial of iron supplementation in children with ASD. Clinicians completed Pediatric Sleep CGIs and structured sleep histories, parents completed the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ), and children wore actigraphy watches. RESULTS: In repeated measures models, the Pediatric Sleep CGI and CSHQ were correlated for sleep onset delay (r = .66, p < .001), night wakings (r = .40, p < .001), and total score (r = .29, p < .001). The CGI-S sleep onset delay and actigraphy sleep onset delay scores (r = .75, p = .0095) were also correlated. The overall CGI-S showed improvement with therapy (p = .047). CONCLUSION: The Pediatric Sleep CGI shows promise in measuring clinician-rated outcomes in pediatric insomnia in children with ASD. Larger samples will be necessary to examine reliability, validity, and measure to change, as well as applicability to other populations with pediatric insomnia.

6 Article Better Nights/Better Days-Distance Intervention for Insomnia in School-Aged Children With/Without ADHD: A Randomized Controlled Trial. 2016

Corkum, Penny / Lingley-Pottie, Patricia / Davidson, Fiona / McGrath, Patrick / Chambers, Christine T / Mullane, Jennifer / Laredo, Sheila / Woodford, Kimberley / Weiss, Shelly K. ·Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, penny.corkum@dal.ca. · Department of Psychiatry, Strongest Families Institute, and. · Department of Psychology and Neuroscience. · Department of Psychiatry, Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, Strongest Families Institute, and. · Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University. · Department of Pediatrics, University of Toronto. · Strongest Families Institute, and. ·J Pediatr Psychol · Pubmed #27189687.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Better Nights/Better Days, a distance intervention for insomnia in school-aged children (with and without attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder [ADHD]), was evaluated to determine its effectiveness on children's sleep and psychosocial functioning. METHODS: A single center, parallel group design randomized controlled trial (stratified on ADHD diagnosis) was conducted. Parents were randomized to intervention (n = 31) or waitlist control (n = 30), and completed questionnaires administered over the phone at baseline, postintervention (2 months), and follow-up (6 months). Actigraphy was also collected. The intervention consisted of a five-session manual and weekly telephone coach support. RESULTS: The intervention group demonstrated a significant reduction in sleep problems and improved psychosocial functioning at postintervention and follow-up. Actigraphy results indicated improved sleep onset, but not sleep duration. Children with and without ADHD responded in a similar manner to this intervention. Parents provided high satisfaction ratings. CONCLUSIONS: This intervention holds promise as an accessible, sustainable, and effective program to address insomnia in school-aged children.

7 Article Sleep in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: How Are Measures of Parent Report and Actigraphy Related and Affected by Sleep Education? 2016

Veatch, Olivia J / Reynolds, Ann / Katz, Terry / Weiss, Shelly K / Loh, Alvin / Wang, Lily / Malow, Beth A. ·a Sleep Disorders Division, Department of Neurology , Vanderbilt University Medical Center , Nashville , Tennessee , USA. · b Department of Pediatrics , Anschutz Medical Campus, University of Colorado School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver , Aurora , Colorado , USA. · c Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto , Toronto , Ontario , Canada. · d Surrey Place Centre , Toronto , Ontario , Canada. · e Department of Biostatistics , Vanderbilt University , Nashville , Tennessee , USA. ·Behav Sleep Med · Pubmed #26619899.

ABSTRACT: Sleep disturbance is common in children with autism, resulting in a great need for effective treatments. To evaluate treatments for sleep disturbance in this population, it is critical to understand the relationship between measures of sleep captured by parent report and objective measures. The Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) and actigraphy-measured data from 80 children with autism and sleep-onset delay were evaluated. Reported problems with sleep-onset delay were concurrent with sleep duration problems in 66% of children, night wakings in 72% of children, and bedtime resistance in 66% of children; 38% of children were reported to have problems with all CSHQ insomnia domains. Actigraphy-measured sleep duration was correlated with estimates using CSHQ-reported bed and wake times.

8 Article Parent-based sleep education for children with autism spectrum disorders. 2014

Malow, Beth A / Adkins, Karen W / Reynolds, Ann / Weiss, Shelly K / Loh, Alvin / Fawkes, Diane / Katz, Terry / Goldman, Suzanne E / Madduri, Niru / Hundley, Rachel / Clemons, Traci. ·Sleep Disorders Division, Department of Neurology and Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 1161 21st Avenue South, Room A-0116, Nashville, TN, 37232, USA, beth.malow@vanderbilt.edu. ·J Autism Dev Disord · Pubmed #23754339.

ABSTRACT: This study provided sleep education to parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to determine whether an individual or group format was more effective in improving sleep and aspects of daytime behavior and family functioning. Eighty children, ages 2-10 years, with ASD and sleep onset delay completed the study. Actigraphy and parent questionnaires were collected at baseline and 1 month after treatment. Mode of education did not affect outcomes. Sleep latency, insomnia subscales on the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire, and other outcomes related to child and family functioning improved with treatment. Parent-based sleep education, delivered in relatively few sessions, was associated with improved sleep onset delay in children with ASD. Group versus individualized education did not affect outcome.

9 Article Effects of a standardized pamphlet on insomnia in children with autism spectrum disorders. 2012

Adkins, Karen W / Molloy, Cindy / Weiss, Shelly K / Reynolds, Ann / Goldman, Suzanne E / Burnette, Courtney / Clemons, Traci / Fawkes, Diane / Malow, Beth A. ·Sleep Disorders Division, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA. ·Pediatrics · Pubmed #23118244.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Sleep difficulties are common reasons why parents seek medical intervention in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). We determined whether a pamphlet alone could be used by parents to help their child's insomnia. METHODS: Thirty-six children with ASD, ages 2 to 10 years, were enrolled. All had prolonged sleep latency confirmed by actigraphy showing a mean sleep latency of 30 minutes or more. Parents were randomly assigned to receive the sleep education pamphlet or no intervention. Children wore an actigraphy device to record baseline sleep parameters, with the primary outcome variable being change in sleep latency. Actigraphy data were collected a second time 2 weeks after the parent received the randomization assignment and analyzed by using Student's t test. Parents were also asked a series of questions to gather information about the pamphlet and its usefulness. RESULTS: Although participants randomized to the 2 arms did not differ statistically in age, gender, socioeconomic status, total Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire score, or actigraphy parameters, some differences may be large enough to affect results. Mean change in sleep-onset latency did not differ between the randomized groups (pamphlet versus no pamphlet). Parents commented that the pamphlet contained good information, but indicated that it would have been more useful to be given specific examples of how to take the information and put it into practice. CONCLUSIONS: A sleep education pamphlet did not appear to improve sleep latency in children with ASDs.