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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles by Donna L. Washington
Based on 3 articles published since 2009
(Why 3 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Donna L. Washington wrote the following 3 articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Estimated Prevalence of Insomnia among Women Veterans: Results of a Postal Survey. 2017

Martin, Jennifer L / Schweizer, C Amanda / Hughes, Jaime M / Fung, Constance H / Dzierzewski, Joseph M / Washington, Donna L / Kramer, B Josea / Jouldjian, Stella / Mitchell, Michael N / Josephson, Karen R / Alessi, Cathy A. ·VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Los Angeles, California; David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, California. Electronic address: Jennifer.Martin@va.gov. · VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, HSR&D Center for the Study of Healthcare Innovation, Implementation & Policy, Los Angeles, California. · Durham VA Healthcare System, Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham, North Carolina. · VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Los Angeles, California; David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, California. · Virginia Commonwealth University, Department of Psychology, Richmond, Virginia. · David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, California; VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, HSR&D Center for the Study of Healthcare Innovation, Implementation & Policy, Los Angeles, California. · VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Los Angeles, California. ·Womens Health Issues · Pubmed #28110799.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Insomnia is a significant public health concern known to particularly impact women and the veteran population; however, rates of insomnia disorder among women veterans are not known. METHOD: Women veterans who had received health care at VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System between 2008 and 2010 and resided within 25 miles of the facility were sent a postal survey assessing sleep, demographics, and other related patient characteristics. RESULTS: A total of 660 women (43.1% of potential responders) returned the postal survey and provided sufficient information for insomnia diagnosis. On average, women reported 6.2 hours of sleep per night. The prevalence of insomnia, determined according to diagnostic criteria from the International Classification of Sleep Disorders-2, was 52.3%. Women with insomnia reported more severely disturbed sleep, and more pain, menopausal symptoms, stress/worries, and nightmares compared with women without insomnia. There was a quadratic relationship between age and insomnia with women in their mid-40s, most likely to have insomnia. CONCLUSIONS: This survey study found that insomnia symptoms were endorsed by more than one-half of the women veterans in this sample of VA users, highlighting the critical need for enhanced clinical identification and intervention. Further research is needed to establish national rates of insomnia among women veterans and to improve access to evidence-based treatment of insomnia disorder.

2 Article Acceptability of Medication and Nonmedication Treatment for Insomnia Among Female Veterans: Effects of Age, Insomnia Severity, and Psychiatric Symptoms. 2016

Culver, Najwa C / Song, Yeonsu / Kate McGowan, Sarah / Fung, Constance H / Mitchell, Michael N / Rodriguez, Juan Carlos / Dzierzewski, Joseph M / Josephson, Karen R / Jouldjian, Stella / Washington, Donna L / Yano, Elizabeth M / Schweizer, C Amanda / Alessi, Cathy A / Martin, Jennifer L. ·Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System. Electronic address: najwa.culver@va.gov. · Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System; David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California. · Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System. · Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System; Department of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile. · Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System; Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Virginia. · David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California; VA Health Services Research & Development Center for the Study of Healthcare Innovation, Implementation, and Policy, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, California. · VA Health Services Research & Development Center for the Study of Healthcare Innovation, Implementation, and Policy, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, California; Fielding School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, California. ·Clin Ther · Pubmed #28314434.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Female veterans are at high risk for sleep problems, and there is a need to provide effective treatment for this population who experience insomnia. This study's primary goal was to compare the acceptability of medication versus nonmedication treatments for insomnia among female veterans. In addition, we examined the role of patient age, severity of sleep disturbance, and psychiatric symptoms on acceptability of each treatment approach and on the differences in acceptability between these approaches. METHODS: A large nationwide postal survey was sent to a random sample of 4000 female veterans who had received health care at a Veterans Administration (VA) facility in the previous 6 months (May 29, 2012-November 28, 2012). A total of 1559 completed surveys were returned. Survey items used for the current analyses included: demographic characteristics, sleep quality, psychiatric symptoms, military service experience, and acceptability of medication and nonmedication treatments for insomnia. For analysis, only ratings of "very acceptable" were used to indicate an interest in the treatment approach (vs ratings of "not at all acceptable," "a little acceptable," "somewhat acceptable," and "no opinion/don׳t know"). FINDINGS: In the final sample of 1538 women with complete data, 57.7% rated nonmedication treatment as very acceptable while only 33.5% rated medication treatment as very acceptable. This difference was statistically significant for the group as a whole and when examining subgroups of patients based on age, sleep quality, psychiatric symptoms, and military experience. The percentage of respondents rating medication treatment as very acceptable was higher for women who were younger, had more severe sleep disturbances, had more psychiatric symptoms, who were not combat exposed, and who had experienced military sexual trauma. By contrast, the percentage of respondents rating nonmedication treatment as very acceptable differed only by age (younger women were more likely to find nonmedication treatment acceptable) and difficulty falling asleep. IMPLICATIONS: Female veterans are more likely to find nonmedication insomnia treatment acceptable compared with medication treatment. Thus, it is important to match these patients with effective behavioral interventions such as cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia. Efforts to educate providers about these preferences and about the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia may serve to connect female veterans who have insomnia to the treatment they prefer. These findings also suggest that older female veterans may be less likely to find either approach as acceptable as their younger counterparts.

3 Article Insomnia and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder among women veterans. 2013

Hughes, Jaime / Jouldjian, Stella / Washington, Donna L / Alessi, Cathy A / Martin, Jennifer L. ·Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System. ·Behav Sleep Med · Pubmed #23205531.

ABSTRACT: Women will account for 10% of the Veteran population by 2020, yet there has been little focus on sleep issues among women Veterans. In a descriptive study of 107 women Veterans with insomnia (mean age = 49 years, 44% non-Hispanic white), 55% had probable post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (total score ≥33). Probable PTSD was related to more severe self-reported sleep disruption and greater psychological distress. In a regression model, higher PTSD Checklist-Civilian (PCL-C) total score was a significant independent predictor of worse insomnia severity index score while other factors were not. Women Veterans preferred behavioral treatments over pharmacotherapy in general, and efforts to increase the availability of such treatments should be undertaken. Further research is needed to better understand the complex relationship between insomnia and PTSD among women Veterans.