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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles by Sooyeon Suh
Based on 11 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Sooyeon Suh wrote the following 11 articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Non-pharmacological treatment of insomnia. 2012

Siebern, Allison T / Suh, Sooyeon / Nowakowski, Sara. ·Stanford University School of Medicine, Sleep Medicine Center, Redwood City, California 94063, USA. asiebern@stanford.edu ·Neurotherapeutics · Pubmed #22935989.

ABSTRACT: Insomnia is one of the most common sleep disorders, which is characterized by nocturnal symptoms of difficulties initiating and/or maintaining sleep, and by daytime symptoms that impair occupational, social, or other areas of functioning. Insomnia disorder can exist alone or in conjunction with comorbid medical and/or psychiatric conditions. The incidence of insomnia is higher in women and can increase during certain junctures of a woman's life (e.g., pregnancy, postpartum, and menopause). This article will focus on an overview of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia, evidence of effectiveness for this treatment when insomnia disorder is experienced alone or in parallel with a comorbidity, and a review with promising data on the use of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia when present during postpartum and menopause.

2 Article Sleep Misperception in Chronic Insomnia Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Implications for Clinical Assessment. 2016

Choi, Su Jung / Suh, Sooyeon / Ong, Jason / Joo, Eun Yeon. ·Department of Nursing, Samsung Medical Center, Department of Clinical Nursing Science, Graduate School of Clinical Nursing Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology, Neuroscience Center, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Sungshin Women's University, Department of Psychology, Seoul, Korea. · Stanford University, Department of Psychiatry, Palo Alto, CA. · Rush University, Department of Behavioral Sciences, Chicago, IL. · Department of Health Sciences and Technology, SAIHST, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Korea. ·J Clin Sleep Med · Pubmed #27568893.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether sleep perception (SP), defined by the ratio of subjective and objective total sleep time, and habitual sleep time in various sleep disorders may be based on comorbid insomnia status. METHODS: We enrolled 420 patients (age 20-79 y) who underwent polysomnography (PSG). They were divided into three groups based on chief complaints: chronic insomnia (CI, n = 69), patients with both obstructive sleep apnea and insomnia (OSA-I, n = 49) or OSA only (OSA, n = 149). Healthy volunteers were also recruited (normal controls [NC], n = 80). We compared differences in PSG parameters and habitual sleep duration and investigated the discrepancy between objective and subjective total sleep time (TST) and sleep latency among four groups. Subjective TST was defined as sleep time perceived by participants the next morning of PSG. RESULTS: SP for TST was highest in the OSA group (median 92.9%), and lowest in the CI group (80.3%). SP of the NC group (91.4%) was higher than the CI, but there was no difference between OSA-I and OSA groups. OSA-I had higher depressive mood compared to the OSA group (p < 0.001). SP was positively associated with the presence of OSA and habitual sleep duration and negatively related to the presence of insomnia and arousal index of PSG. Insomnia patients with (OSA-I) or without OSA (CI) reported the smallest discrepancy between habitual sleep duration and objective TST. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with OSA with or without insomnia have different PSG profiles, which suggests that objective measures of sleep are an important consideration for differentiating subtypes of insomnia and tailoring proper treatment. COMMENTARY: A commentary on this articles appears in this issue on page 1437.

3 Article Is Insomnia Lonely? Exploring Thwarted Belongingness as an Explanatory Link between Insomnia and Suicidal Ideation in a Sample of South Korean University Students. 2016

Chu, Carol / Hom, Melanie A / Rogers, Megan L / Ringer, Fallon B / Hames, Jennifer L / Suh, Sooyeon / Joiner, Thomas E. ·Florida State University, Department of Psychology, Tallahassee, FL. · Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN. · Sungshin Women's University, Department of Psychology, Seoul, South Korea. · Stanford University, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA. ·J Clin Sleep Med · Pubmed #26857060.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVES: Suicide is a serious public health problem, and suicide rates are particularly high in South Korea. Insomnia has been identified as a risk factor for suicidal ideation; however, little is known about the mechanisms accounting for this relationship in this population. Based on the premise that insomnia can be lonely (e.g., being awake when everyone else is asleep), the purpose of this study was to examine whether greater insomnia severity would be associated with higher levels of thwarted belongingness and suicidal ideation, and whether thwarted belongingness would mediate the relationship between insomnia and suicidal ideation. METHODS: Predictions were tested in a sample of 552 South Korean young adults who completed self-report measures of insomnia severity, suicidal ideation, and thwarted belongingness. RESULTS: Greater insomnia symptom severity was significantly and positively associated with thwarted belongingness and suicidal ideation. Mediation analyses revealed that thwarted belongingness significantly accounted for the relationship between insomnia severity and suicidal ideation. CONCLUSIONS: These findings highlight the potential importance of monitoring and therapeutically impacting insomnia and thwarted belongingness to help reduce suicide risk.

4 Article Cortical Thinning and Altered Cortico-Cortical Structural Covariance of the Default Mode Network in Patients with Persistent Insomnia Symptoms. 2016

Suh, Sooyeon / Kim, Hosung / Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh / Joo, Eunyeon / Shin, Chol. ·Sungshin Women's University, Department of Psychology, Seoul, Korea. · Stanford University, Department of Psychiatry, Palo Alto, CA. · University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA. · Center for Studies in Behavioral Neurobiology, PERFORM Center & Department of Exercise Science, Concordia University, Montreal, Canada. · Centre de Recherche de l'Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal & Department of Neurosciences, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada. · Samsung Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Korea University Ansan Hospital, Institute of Human Genomic Study, Seoul, Korea. · Korea University Ansan Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul, Korea. ·Sleep · Pubmed #26414892.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVES: Recent studies have suggested that structural abnormalities in insomnia may be linked with alterations in the default-mode network (DMN). This study compared cortical thickness and structural connectivity linked to the DMN in patients with persistent insomnia (PI) and good sleepers (GS). METHODS: The current study used a clinical subsample from the longitudinal community-based Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES). Cortical thickness and structural connectivity linked to the DMN in patients with persistent insomnia symptoms (PIS; n = 57) were compared to good sleepers (GS; n = 40). All participants underwent MRI acquisition. Based on literature review, we selected cortical regions corresponding to the DMN. A seed-based structural covariance analysis measured cortical thickness correlation between each seed region of the DMN and other cortical areas. Association of cortical thickness and covariance with sleep quality and neuropsychological assessments were further assessed. RESULTS: Compared to GS, cortical thinning was found in PIS in the anterior cingulate cortex, precentral cortex, and lateral prefrontal cortex. Decreased structural connectivity between anterior and posterior regions of the DMN was observed in the PIS group. Decreased structural covariance within the DMN was associated with higher PSQI scores. Cortical thinning in the lateral frontal lobe was related to poor performance in executive function in PIS. CONCLUSION: Disrupted structural covariance network in PIS might reflect malfunctioning of antero-posterior disconnection of the DMN during the wake to sleep transition that is commonly found during normal sleep. The observed structural network alteration may further implicate commonly observed sustained sleep difficulties and cognitive impairment in insomnia.

5 Article Hippocampal substructural vulnerability to sleep disturbance and cognitive impairment in patients with chronic primary insomnia: magnetic resonance imaging morphometry. 2014

Joo, Eun Yeon / Kim, Hosung / Suh, Sooyeon / Hong, Seung Bong. ·Sleep Center, Department of Neurology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Neurology and Brain Imaging Center, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Korea University Ansan Hospital, Human Genome Institute, Korea University, Seoul, Korea ; Stanford University, Department of Psychiatry, Redwood City, CA. ·Sleep · Pubmed #25061247.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVES: Despite compelling evidence from animal studies indicating hippocampal subfield-specific vulnerability to poor sleep quality and related cognitive impairment, there have been no human magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies investigating the relationship between hippocampal subfield volume and sleep disturbance. Our aim was to investigate the pattern of volume changes across hippocampal subfields in patients with primary insomnia relative to controls. DESIGN: Pointwise morphometry allowed for volume measurements of hippocampal regions on T1-weighted MRI. SETTING: University hospital. PATIENTS: Twenty-seven unmedicated patients (age: 51.2 ± 9.6 y) and 30 good sleepers as controls (50.4 ± 7.1 y). INTERVENTIONS: N/A. MEASUREMENTS: We compared hippocampal subfield volumes between patients and controls and correlated volume with clinical and neuropsychological features in patients. RESULTS: Patients exhibited bilateral atrophy across all hippocampal subfields (P < 0.05 corrected). Cornu ammonis (CA) 1 subfield atrophy was associated with worse sleep quality (higher Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and higher arousal index of polysomnography) (r < -0.45, P < 0.005). The volume of the combined region, including the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3-4, negatively correlated with verbal memory, verbal information processing, and verbal fluency in patients (|r| > 0.45, P < 0.05). Hemispheric volume asymmetry of this region (left smaller than right) was associated with impaired verbal domain functions (r = 0.50, P < 0.005). CONCLUSION: Hippocampal subfield atrophy in chronic insomnia suggests reduced neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) and neuronal loss in the cornu ammonis (CA) subfields in conditions of sleep fragmentation and related chronic stress condition. Atrophy in the CA3-4-DG region was associated with impaired cognitive functions in patients. These observations may provide insight into pathophysiological mechanisms that make patients with chronic sleep disturbance vulnerable to cognitive impairment. CITATION: Joo EY, Kim H, Suh S, Hong SB. Hippocampal substructural vulnerability to sleep disturbance and cognitive impairment in patients with chronic primary insomnia: magnetic resonance imaging morphometry.

6 Article Who is at risk for having persistent insomnia symptoms? A longitudinal study in the general population in Korea. 2014

Suh, Sooyeon / Yang, Hae-Chung / Fairholme, Christopher P / Kim, Hyun / Manber, Rachel / Shin, Chol. ·Korea University Ansan Hospital, Institute of Human Genomic Study, Ansan, Republic of Korea; Stanford University, Department of Psychiatry, Palo Alto, CA, United States. · Korea University Ansan Hospital, Institute of Human Genomic Study, Ansan, Republic of Korea; Yongmoon Graduate School of Counseling Psychology, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Stanford University, Department of Psychiatry, Palo Alto, CA, United States. · Korea University Ansan Hospital, Institute of Human Genomic Study, Ansan, Republic of Korea; Department of Psychology, Boston University, Boston, MA, United States. · Stanford University, Department of Psychiatry, Palo Alto, CA, United States. Electronic address: rmanber@stanford.edu. · Korea University Ansan Hospital, Institute of Human Genomic Study, Ansan, Republic of Korea; Division of Pulmonary, Sleep and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: chol-shin@korea.ac.kr. ·Sleep Med · Pubmed #24457162.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Our study had three goals: (1) to investigate the longitudinal course of insomnia symptoms over 4 years (3 time points) by analyzing the trajectory of insomnia symptoms for all participants, (2) to compare persistent insomnia symptom to nonpersistent insomnia symptom groups on mental health and quality of life (QoL), and (3) to conduct exploratory analyses on the relative contribution of multiple factors to persistence of insomnia symptoms. METHODS: Our population-based longitudinal study utilized a community-based sample from the Korean Genome and Epidemiology study (KoGES). Participants were 1247 individuals (40.1% men; mean age, 54.3±7.1 years). Insomnia, QoL (measured by 12-item Short-Form health survey [SF-12]), sleep-interfering behaviors, and depression (measured by the Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]) were followed with biennial examinations at 3 data points spaced 2 years apart (baseline, time 1, and time 2). RESULTS: Among individuals experiencing insomnia symptoms at baseline, the most common trajectory was to experience persistent nocturnal insomnia symptoms across all 3 time points. Those with persistent insomnia symptoms had significantly lower physical and mental QoL (measured by SF-12) and higher depression (measured by BDI) at time points compared to those without persistent nocturnal insomnia symptoms. A follow-up exploratory receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis identified poor sleep quality, frequent sleep-interfering behaviors, and low mental health QoL as the strongest predictors of persistent insomnia symptoms above other well-known risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: In particular, an interaction between poor sleep quality, sleep-interfering behaviors, and mental health QoL appeared to be the strongest risk factor for persistent insomnia symptoms.

7 Article Longitudinal course of insomnia: age-related differences in subjective sleepiness and vigilance performance in a population-based sample. 2013

Kim, Hyun / Suh, Sooyeon / Cho, Eo Rin / Yang, Hae-Chung / Yun, Chang-Ho / Thomas, Robert Joseph / Lee, Seung Ku / Shin, Chol. ·Institute of Human Genomic Study, School of Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan, Republic of Korea. ·J Psychosom Res · Pubmed #24290042.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The present study utilized a population-based sample investigating the following aims: (1) compare the longitudinal course of insomnia in middle-aged and older adults and (2) examine age-related differences on subjective complaint and objective performance in middle-aged and older adults based on the course of insomnia. METHODS: 1657 middle-aged adults (48.16% male, mean age=55.35±4.03years) and 405 older adults (48.40% male, mean age=70.13±3.88years) from the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES) were classified into 4 groups - no insomnia (NI), single episode insomnia (SEI), remitted persistent insomnia (PI-R), and ongoing persistent insomnia (PI-O) based on their course of insomnia over 5 time points spaced two years apart. Their performance on the psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) and subjective daytime sleepiness were compared across different insomnia groups, and the results were compared between middle-aged adults and older adults. RESULTS: Analysis of covariance indicated that subjective daytime sleepiness was significantly different across the insomnia groups in middle-aged adults based on insomnia group (P=<.0001), but, did not affect objective vigilance performance. In contrast, older adults displayed significantly different PVT response time, but not daytime sleepiness, based on insomnia group (P=0.03). CONCLUSION: Insomnia impacts psychomotor performance and subjective sleepiness differently, based on age group. There may be underlying processes associated with the aging that amplifies the impact of insomnia on vigilance performance, yet lessens perceived sleepiness in older adults.

8 Article Longitudinal course of depression scores with and without insomnia in non-depressed individuals: a 6-year follow-up longitudinal study in a Korean cohort. 2013

Suh, Sooyeon / Kim, Hyun / Yang, Hae-Chung / Cho, Eo Rin / Lee, Seung Ku / Shin, Chol. ·Korea University Ansan Medical Center, Institute of Human Genomic Study, Ansan, Republic of Korea. ·Sleep · Pubmed #23449814.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVE: This is a population-based longitudinal study that followed insomnia symptoms over a 6-year period in non-depressed individuals. The purpose of the study was to (1) investigate the longitudinal course of depression based on number of insomnia episodes; and (2) describe longitudinal associations between insomnia and depression, and insomnia and suicidal ideation. DESIGN: Population-based longitudinal study. SETTING: Community-based sample from the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES). PARTICIPANTS: 1,282 non-depressed individuals (44% male, mean age 52.3 ± 7.14 years). MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: This study prospectively assessed insomnia, depression, and suicidal ideation with 4 time points. Individuals were classified into no insomnia (NI), single episode insomnia (SEI), and persistent insomnia (PI; ≥ insomnia at 2+ time points) groups based on number of times insomnia was indicated. Mixed effects modeling indicated that depression scores increased significantly faster in the PI group compared to the NI (P < 0.001) and SEI (P = 0.02) groups. Additionally, the PI group had significantly increased odds of depression as compared to NI or SEI (OR 2.44, P = 0.001) groups, with 18.7% meeting criteria for depression compared to the NI (5.3%) and SEI (11.6%) groups at end point. The PI group also had significantly increased odds of suicidal ideation as compared to NI or SEI (OR 1.86, P = 0.002) groups. CONCLUSIONS: Persistent insomnia significantly increases the rate in which depression occurs over time in non-depressed individuals, which ultimately leads to higher risk for depression. Additionally, having persistent insomnia also increased the risk of suicidal ideation. CITATION: Suh S; Kim H; Yang HC; Cho ER; Lee SK; Shin C. Longitudinal course of depression scores with and without insomnia in non-depressed individuals: a 6-year follow-up longitudinal study in a Korean cohort. SLEEP 2013;36(3):369-376.

9 Article Clinical significance of night-to-night sleep variability in insomnia. 2012

Suh, Sooyeon / Nowakowski, Sara / Bernert, Rebecca A / Ong, Jason C / Siebern, Allison T / Dowdle, Claire L / Manber, Rachel. ·Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Stanford, CA 94301, USA. alysuh@stanford.edu ·Sleep Med · Pubmed #22357064.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the clinical relevance of night-to-night variability of sleep schedules and insomnia symptoms. METHODS: The sample consisted of 455 patients (193 men, mean age=48) seeking treatment for insomnia in a sleep medicine clinic. All participants received group cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI). Variability in sleep parameters was assessed using sleep diary data. Two composite scores were computed, a behavioral schedule composite score (BCS) and insomnia symptom composite score (ICS). The Insomnia Severity Index, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Morningness-Eveningness Composite Scale were administered at baseline and post-treatment. RESULTS: Results revealed that greater BCS scores were significantly associated with younger age, eveningness chronotype, and greater depression severity (p<0.001). Both depression severity and eveningness chronotype independently predicted variability in sleep schedules (p<0.001). Finally, CBTI resulted in reduced sleep variability for all sleep diary variables except bedtime. Post-treatment symptom reductions in depression severity were greater among those with high versus low baseline BCS scores (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that variability in sleep schedules predict reduction in insomnia and depressive severity following group CBTI. Schedule variability may be particularly important to assess and address among patients with high depression symptoms and those with the evening chronotype.

10 Article CBT for insomnia in patients with high and low depressive symptom severity: adherence and clinical outcomes. 2011

Manber, Rachel / Bernert, Rebecca A / Suh, Sooyeon / Nowakowski, Sara / Siebern, Allison T / Ong, Jason C. ·Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Stanford, CA 94301-5597, USA. rmanber@stanford.edu ·J Clin Sleep Med · Pubmed #22171204.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVES: To evaluate whether depressive symptom severity leads to poorer response and perceived adherence to cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI) and to examine the impact of CBTI on well-being, depressive symptom severity, and suicidal ideation. DESIGN: Pre- to posttreatment case replication series comparing low depression (LowDep) and high depression (HiDep) groups (based on a cutoff of 14 on the Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]). PARTICIPANTS: 127 men and 174 women referred for the treatment of insomnia. INTERVENTIONS: Seven sessions of group CBTI. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Improvement in the insomnia severity, perceived energy, productivity, self-esteem, other aspects of wellbeing, and overall treatment satisfaction did not differ between the HiDep and LowDep groups (p > 0.14). HiDep patients reported lower adherence to a fixed rise time, restricting time in bed, and changing expectations about sleep (p < 0.05). HiDep participants experienced significant reductions in BDI, after removing the sleep item. Levels of suicidal ideation dropped significantly among patients with pretreatment elevations (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Results suggest that pre- to post CBTI improvements in insomnia symptoms, perceived energy, productivity, self-esteem, and other aspects of well-being were similar among patients with and without elevation in depressive symptom severity. Thus, the benefits of CBTI extend beyond insomnia and include improvements in non-sleep outcomes, such as overall well-being and depressive symptom severity, including suicidal ideation, among patients with baseline elevations. Results identify aspects of CBTI that may merit additional attention to further improve outcomes among patients with insomnia and elevated depressive symptom severity.

11 Minor Response to Kawada. 2014

Suh, Sooyeon / Kraemer, Helena C / Yang, Hae-Chung / Fairholme, Christopher P / Manber, Rachel / Shin, Chol. ·Department of Psychology, Sungshin Women's University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Psychiatry, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, USA. · Yongmoon Graduate School of Counseling Psychology, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Korea University Ansan Hospital, Institute for Human Genomic Study, Ansan, Republic of Korea; Division of Pulmonary, Sleep and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: chol-shin@korea.ac.kr. ·Sleep Med · Pubmed #25192674.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --