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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles by Murray B. Stein
Based on 4 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Murray B. Stein wrote the following 4 articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review CLINICAL PRACTICE. Generalized Anxiety Disorder. 2015

Stein, Murray B / Sareen, Jitender. · ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #26580998.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Clinical Trial Sleep Quality Improvement During Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety Disorders. 2016

Ramsawh, Holly J / Bomyea, Jessica / Stein, Murray B / Cissell, Shadha H / Lang, Ariel J. ·a Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress, Department of Psychiatry , Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. · b San Diego State University/University of California San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology. · c Department of Psychiatry , University of California San Diego. · d Department of Family & Preventive Medicine , University of California San Diego. · e Veterans Administration San Diego Health Care System , Center of Excellence for Stress and Mental Health. ·Behav Sleep Med · Pubmed #26244485.

ABSTRACT: Despite the ubiquity of sleep complaints among individuals with anxiety disorders, few prior studies have examined whether sleep quality improves during anxiety treatment. The current study examined pre- to posttreatment sleep quality improvement during cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for panic disorder (PD; n = 26) or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; n = 24). Among sleep quality indices, only global sleep quality and sleep latency improved significantly (but modestly) during CBT. Sleep quality improvement was greater for treatment responders, but did not vary by diagnosis. Additionally, poor baseline sleep quality was independently associated with worse anxiety treatment outcome, as measured by higher intolerance of uncertainty. Additional intervention targeting sleep prior to or during CBT for anxiety may be beneficial for poor sleepers.

3 Article Concussion treatment after combat trauma: development of a telephone based, problem solving intervention for service members. 2015

Bell, Kathleen R / Brockway, Jo Ann / Fann, Jesse R / Cole, Wesley R / St De Lore, Jef / Bush, Nigel / Lang, Ariel J / Hart, Tessa / Warren, Michael / Dikmen, Sureyya / Temkin, Nancy / Jain, Sonia / Raman, Rema / Stein, Murray B. ·Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195, United States. Electronic address: krbell@uw.edu. · Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195, United States. Electronic address: brockja@uw.edu. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195, United States. Electronic address: fann@uw.edu. · Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, General Dynamics Information Technology, Department of Brain Injury Medicine, WAMC, Fort Bragg, NC 28310, United States. Electronic address: wesley.r.cole.ctr@mail.mil. · Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington, 325 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104, United States. Electronic address: saint@uw.edu. · National Center for Telehealth and Technology, 9933 West Hayes Street, Joint Base Lewis McChord, Tacoma, WA 98431, United States. Electronic address: nigel.e.bush.civ@mail.mil. · Department of Psychiatry, University California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive (MC 0855), La Jolla, CA 92093, United States. Electronic address: ajlang@ucsd.edu. · Moss Rehabilitation Research Institute, 50 Township Line Road, Elkins Park, PA 19027, United States. Electronic address: thart@einstein.edu. · Clinical Psychology Doctoral Intern, Fielding Behavioral Health, 10200 132nd Street, Kirkland, WA 98034, United States. Electronic address: mwarren@email.fielding.edu. · Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195, United States; Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington, 325 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104, United States. Electronic address: dikmen@uw.edu. · Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195, United States; Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington, 325 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104, United States; Department of Biostatistics, University of Washington, F-600, Health Sciences Building, Box 357232, Seattle, WA 98195, United States. Electronic address: temkin@uw.edu. · Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093, United States. Electronic address: sojain@ucsd.edu. · Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093, United States. Electronic address: reraman@ucsd.edu. · Department of Psychiatry, University California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive (MC 0855), La Jolla, CA 92093, United States; Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093, United States. Electronic address: mstein@ucsd.edu. ·Contemp Clin Trials · Pubmed #25460344.

ABSTRACT: Military service members (SMs) and veterans who sustain mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) during combat deployments often have co-morbid conditions but are reluctant to seek out therapy in medical or mental health settings. Efficacious methods of intervention that are patient-centered and adaptable to a mobile and often difficult-to-reach population would be useful in improving quality of life. This article describes a new protocol developed as part of a randomized clinical trial of a telephone-mediated program for SMs with mTBI. The 12-session program combines problem solving training (PST) with embedded modules targeting depression, anxiety, insomnia, and headache. The rationale and development of this behavioral intervention for implementation with persons with multiple co-morbidities is described along with the proposed analysis of results. In particular, we provide details regarding the creation of a treatment that is manualized yet flexible enough to address a wide variety of problems and symptoms within a standard framework. The methods involved in enrolling and retaining an often hard-to-study population are also highlighted.

4 Article Impairment associated with sleep problems in the community: relationship to physical and mental health comorbidity. 2008

Stein, Murray B / Belik, Shay-Lee / Jacobi, Frank / Sareen, Jitender. ·Department of Psychiatry and Family, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0855, USA. mstein@ucsd.edu ·Psychosom Med · Pubmed #18842741.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To explore the extent to which associations between sleep problems and functional impairment are attributable to comorbid mental and physical health problems. Sleep problems are being increasingly recognized as a source of morbidity and role impairment. Little is known, however, about the extent to which associations between sleep problems and functional impairment are attributable to comorbid mental and physical health problems. METHODS: We utilized data from the German Health Survey (n = 4181; response rate: 87.6%; ages 18-65 years) to examine the relationships between sleep problems (assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Inventory (PSQI)), mental and physical health comorbidity, and disability and health-related quality of life (assessed by the Medical Outcomes Scale Short Form-36 (SF-36)). RESULTS: A total of 1595 (35.2%) respondents reported current sleep problems (PSQI score of >5). After adjusting for sociodemographic factors, we found the presence of sleep problems was associated with having one or more physical health problems (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.21, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 1.01-1.45) and one or more mental disorders (AOR = 3.58, 95% CI = 2.95-4.35). Among persons with one or more physical health problems, the co-occurrence of a sleep problem was associated with poorer physical component scores on the SF-36 (45.7 versus 48.6, p <.001) and increased odds of >or=1 disability days in the past 30 days due to physical problems (AOR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.20-1.98), even after adjusting for sociodemographic factors and comorbidity with other mental and physical health conditions. CONCLUSIONS: More than one third of adults in the community report sleep problems. These often co-occur with other physical and mental health problems, and when they do they are generally associated with an increased burden of role disability and functional impairment.