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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles by Yeonsu Song
Based on 4 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Yeonsu Song wrote the following 4 articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Sleep in caregivers: what we know and what we need to learn. 2015

McCurry, Susan M / Song, Yeonsu / Martin, Jennifer L. ·aUniversity of Washington, Seattle, Washington bGeriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Department of Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System cDavid Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA. ·Curr Opin Psychiatry · Pubmed #26397027.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The number of informal caregivers providing assistance to adults is increasing commensurate with our aging society. Sleep disturbances are prevalent in caregivers and associated with negative physical, medical, and functional outcomes. Here, we describe the predisposing, precipitating, and perpetuating factors contributing to the development of sleep problems in caregivers, and discuss three understudied caregiving populations that have clinical importance and unique circumstances influencing sleep quality and health. RECENT FINDINGS: There is clear evidence supporting the interaction between sleep loss, caregiving stress, and vulnerability to chronic disease. Telehealth and telemedicine sleep interventions for caregivers combined with assistive technologies targeting care-receivers have potential to be more individualized, affordable, and widely accessible than traditional in-person insomnia treatment approaches. Limited data exist describing the etiology and treatment of sleep problems in caregivers of veterans, medical patients newly discharged from the hospital, and developmentally disabled adults. SUMMARY: There is a growing literature describing the general determinants of sleep disturbances in caregivers, the health consequences of these disturbances, and intervention strategies for treating them. Identifying effective sleep treatments suited to more specialized caregiving situations and increasing intervention access will help caregivers continue to provide quality care while protecting their own health and well-being.

2 Article A Four-Session Sleep Intervention Program Improves Sleep for Older Adult Day Health Care Participants: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial. 2017

Martin, Jennifer L / Song, Yeonsu / Hughes, Jaime / Jouldjian, Stella / Dzierzewski, Joseph M / Fung, Constance H / Rodriguez Tapia, Juan Carlos / Mitchell, Michael N / Alessi, Cathy A. ·Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, North Hills, CA. · David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA. · University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC. · Health Services Research & Development, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC. · Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA. · Department of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, Chile. ·Sleep · Pubmed #28482053.

ABSTRACT: Study Objective: To test the effectiveness of a 4-week behavioral Sleep Intervention Program (SIP: sleep compression, modified stimulus control, and sleep hygiene) compared to a 4-week information-only control (IC) among older adults attending a VA Adult Day Health Care (ADHC) program in a double-blind, randomized, clinical trial. Methods: Forty-two individuals (mean age: 77 years, 93% male) enrolled in a VA ADHC program were randomized to receive SIP or IC. All completed in-person sleep and health assessments at baseline, post-treatment and 4-months follow-up that included 3 days/nights of wrist actigraphy, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Mixed repeated measures analysis was used to compare sleep outcomes at post-treatment and 4-months follow-up, with baseline values as covariates. Results: SIP participants (n = 21) showed significant improvement on actigraphy sleep efficiency (p = .007), number of nighttime awakenings (p = .016), and minutes awake at night (p = .001) at post-treatment, compared to IC participants (n = 21). Benefits were slightly attenuated but remained significant at 4-month follow-up (all p's < .05). There were no differences in total sleep time between groups. There was significant improvement on PSQI factor 3 (daily disturbances) at 4-month follow-up (p = .016), but no differences were observed between SIP and IC on other PSQI components or ISI scores at post-treatment or 4-month follow-up. Conclusions: A short behavioral sleep intervention may have important benefits in improving objectively measured sleep in older adults participating in ADHC. Future studies are needed to study implementation of this intervention into routine clinical care within ADHC.

3 Article Acceptability of Medication and Nonmedication Treatment for Insomnia Among Female Veterans: Effects of Age, Insomnia Severity, and Psychiatric Symptoms. 2016

Culver, Najwa C / Song, Yeonsu / Kate McGowan, Sarah / Fung, Constance H / Mitchell, Michael N / Rodriguez, Juan Carlos / Dzierzewski, Joseph M / Josephson, Karen R / Jouldjian, Stella / Washington, Donna L / Yano, Elizabeth M / Schweizer, C Amanda / Alessi, Cathy A / Martin, Jennifer L. ·Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System. Electronic address: najwa.culver@va.gov. · Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System; David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California. · Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System. · Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System; Department of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile. · Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System; Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Virginia. · David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California; VA Health Services Research & Development Center for the Study of Healthcare Innovation, Implementation, and Policy, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, California. · VA Health Services Research & Development Center for the Study of Healthcare Innovation, Implementation, and Policy, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, California; Fielding School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, California. ·Clin Ther · Pubmed #28314434.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Female veterans are at high risk for sleep problems, and there is a need to provide effective treatment for this population who experience insomnia. This study's primary goal was to compare the acceptability of medication versus nonmedication treatments for insomnia among female veterans. In addition, we examined the role of patient age, severity of sleep disturbance, and psychiatric symptoms on acceptability of each treatment approach and on the differences in acceptability between these approaches. METHODS: A large nationwide postal survey was sent to a random sample of 4000 female veterans who had received health care at a Veterans Administration (VA) facility in the previous 6 months (May 29, 2012-November 28, 2012). A total of 1559 completed surveys were returned. Survey items used for the current analyses included: demographic characteristics, sleep quality, psychiatric symptoms, military service experience, and acceptability of medication and nonmedication treatments for insomnia. For analysis, only ratings of "very acceptable" were used to indicate an interest in the treatment approach (vs ratings of "not at all acceptable," "a little acceptable," "somewhat acceptable," and "no opinion/don׳t know"). FINDINGS: In the final sample of 1538 women with complete data, 57.7% rated nonmedication treatment as very acceptable while only 33.5% rated medication treatment as very acceptable. This difference was statistically significant for the group as a whole and when examining subgroups of patients based on age, sleep quality, psychiatric symptoms, and military experience. The percentage of respondents rating medication treatment as very acceptable was higher for women who were younger, had more severe sleep disturbances, had more psychiatric symptoms, who were not combat exposed, and who had experienced military sexual trauma. By contrast, the percentage of respondents rating nonmedication treatment as very acceptable differed only by age (younger women were more likely to find nonmedication treatment acceptable) and difficulty falling asleep. IMPLICATIONS: Female veterans are more likely to find nonmedication insomnia treatment acceptable compared with medication treatment. Thus, it is important to match these patients with effective behavioral interventions such as cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia. Efforts to educate providers about these preferences and about the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia may serve to connect female veterans who have insomnia to the treatment they prefer. These findings also suggest that older female veterans may be less likely to find either approach as acceptable as their younger counterparts.

4 Article Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in Older Veterans Using Nonclinician Sleep Coaches: Randomized Controlled Trial. 2016

Alessi, Cathy / Martin, Jennifer L / Fiorentino, Lavinia / Fung, Constance H / Dzierzewski, Joseph M / Rodriguez Tapia, Juan C / Song, Yeonsu / Josephson, Karen / Jouldjian, Stella / Mitchell, Michael N. ·Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, California. cathy.alessi@va.gov. · Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California. cathy.alessi@va.gov. · Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Psychiatry, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California. · Department of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, Chile. ·J Am Geriatr Soc · Pubmed #27550552.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To test a new cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) program designed for use by nonclinicians. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Department of Veterans Affairs healthcare system. PARTICIPANTS: Community-dwelling veterans aged 60 and older who met diagnostic criteria for insomnia of 3 months duration or longer (N = 159). INTERVENTION: Nonclinician "sleep coaches" delivered a five-session manual-based CBT-I program including stimulus control, sleep restriction, sleep hygiene, and cognitive therapy (individually or in small groups), with weekly telephone behavioral sleep medicine supervision. Controls received five sessions of general sleep education. MEASUREMENTS: Primary outcomes, including self-reported (7-day sleep diary) sleep onset latency (SOL-D), wake after sleep onset (WASO-D), total wake time (TWT-D), and sleep efficiency (SE-D); Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI); and objective sleep efficiency (7-day wrist actigraphy, SE-A) were measured at baseline, at the posttreatment assessment, and at 6- and 12-month follow-up. Additional measures included the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9)), and quality of life (Medical Outcomes Study 12-item Short-form Survey version 2 (SF-12v2)). RESULTS: Intervention subjects had greater improvement than controls between the baseline and posttreatment assessments, the baseline and 6-month assessments, and the baseline and 12-month assessments in SOL-D (-23.4, -15.8, and -17.3 minutes, respectively), TWT-D (-68.4, -37.0, and -30.9 minutes, respectively), SE-D (10.5%, 6.7%, and 5.4%, respectively), PSQI (-3.4, -2.4, and -2.1 in total score, respectively), and ISI (-4.5, -3.9, and -2.8 in total score, respectively) (all P < .05). There were no significant differences in SE-A, PHQ-9, or SF-12v2. CONCLUSION: Manual-based CBT-I delivered by nonclinician sleep coaches improves sleep in older adults with chronic insomnia.