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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles by Amy M. Shui
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Amy Shui wrote the following 4 articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Modification of the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. 2018

Katz, Terry / Shui, Amy M / Johnson, Cynthia R / Richdale, Amanda L / Reynolds, Ann M / Scahill, Lawrence / Malow, Beth A. ·Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, 13123 E. 16th Street, B-140, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA. terry.katz@ucdenver.edu. · Biostatistics Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · STAR Center for ASD & NDDs, Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. · Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre, School of Psychology and Public Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia. · Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, 13123 E. 16th Street, B-140, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA. · Marcus Autism Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA. · Sleep Disorders Division, Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA. ·J Autism Dev Disord · Pubmed #29500758.

ABSTRACT: Sleep problems are common in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and adversely impact daytime functioning. Although no questionnaires have been developed to assess sleep in children with ASD, the 33-item Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) is widely used in this population. We examined the factor structure of the CSHQ in 2872 children (age 4-10 years) enrolled in the Autism Treatment Network. A four-factor solution (Sleep Initiation and Duration, Sleep Anxiety/Co-Sleeping, Night Waking/Parasomnias, and Daytime Alertness) with 5-6 items per factor explained 75% of the total variation. Ten items failed to load on any factor. This abbreviated 23-item four-factor version of this measure may be useful when assessing sleep in children with ASD.

2 Article Relationship Between Subtypes of Restricted and Repetitive Behaviors and Sleep Disturbance in Autism Spectrum Disorder. 2016

Hundley, Rachel J / Shui, Amy / Malow, Beth A. ·Division of Developmental Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 11101 Doctors' Office Tower, Nashville, TN, 37232-9003, USA. Rachel.j.hundley@vanderbilt.edu. · Biostatistics Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, 50 Staniford St, Suite 560, Boston, MA, 02114-2540, USA. · Sleep Disorders Division, Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, A-0118 MCN, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, 37232, USA. ·J Autism Dev Disord · Pubmed #27511195.

ABSTRACT: We examined the association of two types of restricted and repetitive behaviors, repetitive sensory motor (RSM) and insistence on sameness (IS), with sleep problems in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants included 532 children (aged 2-17) who participated in the Autism Speaks Autism Treatment Network research registry. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised detected the presence of RSM and IS. RSM behaviors were positively associated with parent-reported sleep problems, and this relationship remained significant after controlling for anxiety symptoms. IS was not significantly associated with sleep problems. Better understanding of the relationship between specific types of repetitive behaviors and sleep problems may allow providers to tailor interventions to the individual presentations of their patients with ASD.

3 Article The Pediatric Sleep Clinical Global Impressions Scale-A New Tool to Measure Pediatric Insomnia in Autism Spectrum Disorders. 2016

Malow, Beth A / Connolly, Heidi V / Weiss, Shelly K / Halbower, Ann / Goldman, Suzanne / Hyman, Susan L / Katz, Terry / Madduri, Niru / Shui, Amy / Macklin, Eric / Reynolds, Ann M. ·*Sleep Disorders Division, Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN; †Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY; ‡Department of Neurology, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON; §Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO; ‖Biostatistics Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. ·J Dev Behav Pediatr · Pubmed #27244298.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To pilot a clinician-based outcome measure that provides complementary information to objective measures and parent-based questionnaires for insomnia in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). METHOD: The authors developed a Pediatric Sleep Clinical Global Impressions Scale (CGI). Questions included (1) the child's ability to fall asleep and remain sleeping independently (i.e., apart from parents); (2) bedtime resistance; (3) sleep onset delay; (4) night awakening; (5) parental satisfaction with their child's current sleep patterns; (6) family functioning as affected by their child's current sleep patterns; and (7) clinician's overall concern with the child's sleep. After refining the instrument through the evaluation of vignettes by ASD and sleep experts, the authors piloted the Pediatric Sleep CGI in a 12-week randomized trial of iron supplementation in children with ASD. Clinicians completed Pediatric Sleep CGIs and structured sleep histories, parents completed the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ), and children wore actigraphy watches. RESULTS: In repeated measures models, the Pediatric Sleep CGI and CSHQ were correlated for sleep onset delay (r = .66, p < .001), night wakings (r = .40, p < .001), and total score (r = .29, p < .001). The CGI-S sleep onset delay and actigraphy sleep onset delay scores (r = .75, p = .0095) were also correlated. The overall CGI-S showed improvement with therapy (p = .047). CONCLUSION: The Pediatric Sleep CGI shows promise in measuring clinician-rated outcomes in pediatric insomnia in children with ASD. Larger samples will be necessary to examine reliability, validity, and measure to change, as well as applicability to other populations with pediatric insomnia.

4 Article Sleep Difficulties and Medications in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Registry Study. 2016

Malow, Beth A / Katz, Terry / Reynolds, Ann M / Shui, Amy / Carno, Margaret / Connolly, Heidi V / Coury, Daniel / Bennett, Amanda E. ·Sleep Disorders Division, Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee; beth.malow@vanderbilt.edu. · Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado; · Biostatistics Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; · Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York; · Department of Pediatrics, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio; and. · Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ·Pediatrics · Pubmed #26908483.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Sleep difficulties are common in children with autism spectrum disorders, with wide-ranging effects on the child's daytime behavior. We reviewed data within our Autism Speaks Autism Treatment Network Registry to determine the prevalence of sleep difficulties and patterns of medication use. METHODS: Data from 1518 children ages 4 to 10 years were analyzed to determine the number of children documented to have sleep difficulties by parent-completed questionnaires and clinician-completed forms and how these findings related to the use of sleep medications. RESULTS: The Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire total score was ≥41 (associated with clinically significant sleep problems in past research) in 71% of children. The prevalence of sleep diagnoses was less frequent (30% of children aged 4-10 years; P < .0001). Medications for sleep were prescribed in 46% of 4- to 10-year-olds given a sleep diagnosis. The most common medication used for sleep was melatonin followed by α-agonists, with a variety of other medications taken for sleep (anticonvulsants, antidepressants, atypical antipsychotics, and benzodiazepines). Children taking medications for sleep had worse daytime behavior and pediatric quality of life than children not taking sleep medications. CONCLUSIONS: Parent concerns about sleep may not be reflected in the information gathered during a clinic visit, supporting the need to develop screening practice pathways for sleep in autism spectrum disorders. Furthermore, many medications taken for sleep have adverse effects, supporting the need for evidence-based interventions in this population.