Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles by Maurice M. Ohayon
Based on 11 articles published since 2009
(Why 11 articles?)
||||

Between 2009 and 2019, Maurice M. Ohayon wrote the following 11 articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Challenging the validity of the association between oversleeping and overeating in atypical depression. 2015

Ohayon, Maurice M / Roberts, Laura Weiss. ·Chief of the Division of Public Mental Health and Population Sciences, Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. Electronic address: mohayon@stanford.edu. · Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. Electronic address: robertsl@stanford.edu. ·J Psychosom Res · Pubmed #25450239.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: In this study, we used a strict definition of hypersomnia and tested if the association between overeating-hypersomnia remained positive and significant. Hypersomnia was present if the total sleep time was close to 10h per day or was at least 2h longer than in normothymic periods. METHODS: Cross-sectional study using the adult general population of California and New York. The sample was composed of 6694 individuals aged between 18 and 96years. Participants were interviewed by telephone using the Sleep-EVAL system. The interviews included various sleep and health topics and the assessment of DSM-IV sleep and psychiatric disorders. RESULTS: The one-month prevalence of major depressive episode was 6.1%, including a one-month prevalence of atypical depression of 1.6%, in this sample. Atypical depression subjects had a greater number of depressive symptoms and a longer duration of the current depressive episode than the other depressive subjects. Depressive subjects with hypersomnia slept longer (8h, 29min) than the other depressive subjects (6h, 36min) and longer than the subjects "getting too much sleep" (6h, 48min). Furthermore, hypersomnia was not associated with overeating while "getting too much sleep" showed a positive association with overeating. CONCLUSIONS: Hypersomnia needs to be evaluated using a strict definition. Otherwise, it leads to an overestimation of this symptom in major depressive episode subjects and to a false association with overeating.

2 Article Association between insomnia symptoms and functional status in U.S. older adults. 2014

Spira, Adam P / Kaufmann, Christopher N / Kasper, Judith D / Ohayon, Maurice M / Rebok, George W / Skidmore, Elizabeth / Parisi, Jeanine M / Reynolds, Charles F. ·Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. aspira@jhsph.edu. · Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California. · Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. Center on Aging and Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennysylvania. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, Pennysylvania. ·J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci · Pubmed #25342821.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: We studied the association between insomnia symptoms and late-life functioning, including physical capacity, limitations in household activities, and participation in valued activities. METHODS: Participants were 6,050 adults independent in self-care activities from a representative sample of older Medicare beneficiaries. They completed objective measures of physical capacity and self-report measures of insomnia symptoms, help and difficulty with household activities, and participation in valued activities. RESULTS: After adjustment, insomnia symptoms were associated with a greater odds of receiving help or having difficulty with selected household activities (laundry, shopping), greater odds of help or difficulty with ≥ 1 household activity [1 symptom vs. 0, odds ratio (OR)=1.27, p < .05; 2 symptoms vs. 0, OR = 1.35, p < .01), and of restricted participation in specific valued activities (attending religious services, going out for enjoyment) and in ≥ 1 valued activity (1 symptom vs. 0, OR = 1.29, p < .05; 2 symptoms vs. 0, OR = 1.50, p < .01). There was no independent association between insomnia symptoms and physical capacity. DISCUSSION: Among older adults, insomnia symptoms are associated with a greater odds of limitation in household activities and of restricted participation in valued activities. Insomnia interventions may improve functioning and quality of life among elders.

3 Article Insomnia and accidents: cross-sectional study (EQUINOX) on sleep-related home, work and car accidents in 5293 subjects with insomnia from 10 countries. 2014

Léger, Damien / Bayon, Virginie / Ohayon, Maurice M / Philip, Pierre / Ement, Philippe / Metlaine, Arnaud / Chennaoui, Mounir / Faraut, Brice. ·Université Paris Descartes, APHP, Hôtel-Dieu, Centre du Sommeil et de la Vigilance de l'Hôtel Dieu de Paris, Equipe d'accueil VIFASOM, Stanford Sleep Epidemiology Research European Centre Paris, Paris, France. ·J Sleep Res · Pubmed #24237855.

ABSTRACT: The link between sleepiness and the risk of motor vehicle accidents is well known, but little is understood regarding the risk of home, work and car accidents of subjects with insomnia. An international cross-sectional survey was conducted across 10 countries in a population of subjects with sleep disturbances. Primary care physicians administered a questionnaire that included assessment of sociodemographic characteristics, sleep disturbance and accidents (motor vehicle, work and home) related to sleep problems to each subject. Insomnia was defined using the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD-10) criteria. A total of 5293 subjects were included in the study, of whom 20.9% reported having had at least one home accident within the past 12 months, 10.1% at least one work accident, 9% reported having fallen asleep while driving at least once and 4.1% reported having had at least one car accident related to their sleepiness. All types of accident were reported more commonly by subjects living in urban compared to other residential areas. Car accidents were reported more commonly by employed subjects, whereas home injuries were reported more frequently by the unemployed. Car accidents were reported more frequently by males than by females, whereas home accidents were reported more commonly by females. Patients with insomnia have high rates of home accidents, car accidents and work accidents related to sleep disturbances independently of any adverse effects of hypnotic treatments. Reduced total sleep time may be one factor explaining the high risk of accidents in individuals who complain of insomnia.

4 Article Excessive sleepiness is predictive of cognitive decline in the elderly. 2012

Jaussent, Isabelle / Bouyer, Jean / Ancelin, Marie-Laure / Berr, Claudine / Foubert-Samier, Alexandra / Ritchie, Karen / Ohayon, Maurice M / Besset, Alain / Dauvilliers, Yves. ·Inserm, U1061, Montpellier, France. ·Sleep · Pubmed #22942498.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVES: To examine the association of sleep complaints reported at baseline (insomnia complaints and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS)) and medication, with cognitive decline in community-dwelling elderly. DESIGN: An 8-yr longitudinal study. SETTING: The French Three-City Study. PARTICIPANTS: There were 4,894 patients without dementia recruited from 3 French cities and having a Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) score ≥ 24 points at baseline. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Questionnaires were used to evaluate insomnia complaints (poor sleep quality (SQ), difficulty in initiating sleep (DIS), difficulty in maintaining sleep (DMS), early morning awakening (EMA)), EDS, and sleep medication at baseline. Cognitive decline was defined as a 4-point reduction in MMSE score during follow-up at 2, 4, and 8 yr. Logistic regression models were adjusted for sociodemographic, behavioral, physical, and mental health variables, and apolipoprotein E genotype. EDS independently increased the risk of cognitive decline (odds ratio (OR) = 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.02-1.56), especially for those patients who also developed dementia during the follow-up period (OR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.00-1.97). The number of insomnia complaints and DMS were negatively associated with MMSE cognitive decline (OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.60-0.98 for 3-4 complaints, OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.68-0.96, respectively). The 3 other components of insomnia (SQ, DIS, EMA) were not significantly associated with MMSE cognitive decline. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that EDS may be associated independently with the risk of cognitive decline in the elderly population. Such results could have important public health implications because EDS may be an early marker and potentially reversible risk factor of cognitive decline and onset of dementia.

5 Article Hierarchy of insomnia criteria based on daytime consequences. 2012

Ohayon, Maurice M / Riemann, Dieter / Morin, Charles / Reynolds, Charles F. ·Stanford Sleep Epidemiology Research Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94303, USA. mohayon@stanford.edu ·Sleep Med · Pubmed #22036602.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To explore how insomnia symptoms are hierarchically organized in individuals reporting daytime consequences of their sleep disturbances. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study conducted in the general population of the states of California, New York, and Texas. The sample included 8937 individuals aged 18 years or older representative of the general population. Telephone interviews on sleep habits and disorders were managed with the Sleep-EVAL expert system and using DSM-IV and ICSD classifications. Insomnia symptoms and global sleep dissatisfaction (GSD) had to occur at least three times per week for at least three months. RESULTS: A total of 26.2% of the sample had a GSD. Individuals with GSD reported at least one insomnia symptom in 73.1% of the cases. The presence of GSD in addition to insomnia symptoms considerably increased the proportion of individuals with daytime consequences related to insomnia. In the classification trees performed, GSD arrived as the first predictor for daytime consequences related to insomnia. The second predictor was nonrestorative sleep followed by difficulty resuming sleep and difficulty initiating sleep. CONCLUSIONS: Classification trees are a useful way to hierarchically organize symptoms and to help diagnostic classifications. In this study, GSD was found to be the foremost symptom in identifying individuals with daytime consequences related to insomnia.

6 Article Nocturnal awakenings and difficulty resuming sleep: their burden in the European general population. 2010

Ohayon, Maurice M. ·Stanford Sleep Epidemiology Research Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA 94303, USA. mohayon@stanford.edu ·J Psychosom Res · Pubmed #21109044.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To (1) define the prevalence and importance of nocturnal awakenings (NA) in the general population, and (2) investigate its associations with daytime impairment, physical diseases, and psychiatric disorders. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional telephone study conducted in the general population of France, United Kingdom, Germany, Italy, and Spain. A representative sample consisting of 22,740 non-institutionalized individuals aged 15 or over was interviewed regarding sleeping habits, health, sleep and mental disorders. Nocturnal awakenings were evaluated according to their frequency per week and per night and their duration. RESULTS: At the time of the interview, 31.2% (95% confidence interval: 30.6-31.8%) of the sample reported waking up at least 3 nights per week and 7.7% (7.4% to 8.0%) of the sample had difficulty resuming sleep (DRS) after they woke up. Duration of the symptom was longer than one year in 78.8% of the cases. DRS had greater impacts on daytime functioning than any other kind of NA or other insomnia symptoms with odds ratios five to seven times higher than individuals waking up once or twice within the same night. Individuals with painful physical condition or with a psychiatric disorder were more than four times more likely to have DRS. Other significant factors associated with NA were hypertension, cardio-vascular disease, upper airway disease, diabetes, and heavy caffeine consumption. CONCLUSIONS: Nocturnal awakenings are highly prevalent in the general population and strongly associated with various physical diseases and psychiatric disorders. There is also a dose response effect in the associations: odds ratios increased with the number of awakenings during the same night and the difficulty resuming sleep once awakened. The study shows that nocturnal awakenings are complex and should be assessed systematically.

7 Article Prevalence of insomnia and sleep characteristics in the general population of Spain. 2010

Ohayon, Maurice M / Sagales, Teresa. ·Stanford Sleep Epidemiology Research Center, Stanford University, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA. mohayon@stanford.edu ·Sleep Med · Pubmed #21093362.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The goals of this study were to estimate the prevalence of insomnia symptomatology and diagnoses in the Spanish general population and to determine if certain sleep parameters were related to specific insomnia symptoms. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional telephone survey performed in the general population of Spain using a representative sample of 4065 individuals aged 15years or older. The participation rate was 87.5%. Interviews were conducted using the Sleep-EVAL system. The questions were related to sociodemographic characteristics, sleep-wake schedule, events occurring during sleep, insomnia symptoms, daytime consequences and DSM-IV diagnoses of sleep disorders. RESULTS: Overall, 20.8% (95% C.I. 19.6-22.1%) of the sample reported at least one insomnia symptom occurring at least three nights/week. The prevalence was higher in women than in men (23.9% vs. 17.6%) and increased with age. Difficulty maintaining sleep at least three nights/week was the most prevalent symptom. DSM-IV insomnia disorder diagnoses were found in 6.4% (95% C.I. 5.6-7.1%) of the sample. Delayed bedtime and wake-up time, irregular bedtime hours and hypnagogic hallucinations were the most frequent in participants who had difficulty initiating sleep. Perception of light and "too short" sleep were the most frequent in participants who had early morning awakenings. Participants who had a non-restorative sleep were more likely to extend sleep on days off than other insomnia participants. Medical consultations in the previous year were more frequent in insomnia participants compared to participants without insomnia. One-fifth of insomnia participants were using sleep-promoting medication. CONCLUSIONS: Insomnia is frequent in Spain, affecting up to one in five individuals. Results show that insomnia is multidimensional and needs to be assessed as such.

8 Article Prevalence and correlates of insomnia in the Swedish population aged 19-75 years. 2010

Ohayon, Maurice M / Bader, Gaby. ·Stanford Sleep Epidemiology Research Center, Stanford University, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA. mohayon@stanford.edu ·Sleep Med · Pubmed #21087896.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of insomnia symptoms, their associated factors and daytime symptoms in the general population of Sweden. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional postal survey performed in the general population of Sweden aged between 19 and 75 years (6 million inhabitants). A total of 1209 out of 1705 randomly selected participants from the National Register of the Total Population completed the questionnaire. The participation rate was 71.3%. Participants filled out a paper-pencil questionnaire composed of 157 items covering sociodemographic characteristics, sleeping habits and environment, sleep quality and sleep symptoms, and health status. RESULTS: We found 32.1% (95% confidence interval: 29.5-34.8%) of the sample reported having difficulty initiating (DIS) or maintaining sleep (DMS) or non-restorative sleep accompanied with sufficient sleep (NRS) at least 4 nights per week: 6.3% of the sample had DIS, 14.5% had DMS and 18.0% had NRS. Results from logistic regressions showed that restless legs symptoms, breathing pauses during sleep and depressive or anxious mood were associated with DIS and DMS but not NRS. Living in an urban area (OR:2.0) and drinking alcohol daily (OR:4.6) were associated only with NRS. Daytime symptoms were reported by over 75% of subjects with insomnia symptoms. DIS, DMS and NRS were associated with daytime fatigue but not excessive sleepiness as measured by the Epworth scale. DIS was associated with the use of sleeping pills or natural sleeping aid compounds in multivariate models. CONCLUSIONS: Insomnia symptoms occurring at least 4 nights per week are frequent in Sweden, affecting about a third of the population. Subjects with NRS have a distinctly different profile than those with DIS or DMS, which suggests different etiological causes for this symptom.

9 Article Using difficulty resuming sleep to define nocturnal awakenings. 2010

Ohayon, Maurice M / Krystal, Andrew / Roehrs, Timothy A / Roth, Thomas / Vitiello, Michael V. ·Stanford Sleep Epidemiology Research Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94303, USA. mohayon@stanford.edu ·Sleep Med · Pubmed #20075004.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Nocturnal awakenings are one of the most prevalent sleep disturbances in the general population. Little is known, however, about the frequency of these episodes and how difficulty resuming sleep once awakened affects subjective sleep quality and quantity. METHOD: This is a cross-sectional telephone study with a representative sample consisting of 8937 non-institutionalized individuals aged 18 or over living in Texas, New York and California. The interviews included questions on sleeping habits, health, sleep and mental disorders. Nocturnal awakenings were evaluated according to their frequency per week and per night, as well as their duration. RESULTS: A total of 35.5% of the sample reported awakening at least three nights per week. Of this 35.5%, 43% (15.2% of the total sample) reported difficulty resuming sleep once awakened. More than 80% of subjects with insomnia symptoms (difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep or non-restorative sleep) also had nocturnal awakenings. Difficulty resuming sleep was associated with subjective shorter sleep duration, poorer sleep quality, greater daytime impairment, greater consultations for sleep disturbances and greater likelihood of receiving a sleep medication. CONCLUSIONS: Nocturnal awakenings disrupt the sleep of about one-third of the general population. Using difficulty resuming sleep identifies individuals with significant daytime impairment who are most likely to seek medical help for their sleep disturbances. In the absence of other insomnia symptoms, nocturnal awakenings alone are unlikely to be associated with daytime impairments.

10 Article Epidemiological and clinical relevance of insomnia diagnosis algorithms according to the DSM-IV and the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD). 2009

Ohayon, Maurice M / Reynolds, Charles F. ·Stanford Sleep Epidemiology Research Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94303, USA. mohayon@stanford.edu ·Sleep Med · Pubmed #19748312.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Although the epidemiology of insomnia in the general population has received considerable attention in the past 20 years, few studies have investigated the prevalence of insomnia using operational definitions such as those set forth in the ICSD and DSM-IV, specifying what proportion of respondents satisfied the criteria to reach a diagnosis of insomnia disorder. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study involving 25,579 individuals aged 15 years and over representative of the general population of France, the United Kingdom, Germany, Italy, Portugal, Spain and Finland. The participants were interviewed on sleep habits and disorders managed by the Sleep-EVAL expert system using DSM-IV and ICSD classifications. RESULTS: At the complaint level, too short sleep (20.2%), light sleep (16.6%), and global sleep dissatisfaction (8.2%) were reported by 37% of the subjects. At the symptom level (difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep and non-restorative sleep at least 3 nights per week), 34.5% of the sample reported at least one of them. At the criterion level, (symptoms+daytime consequences), 9.8% of the total sample reported having them. At the diagnostic level, 6.6% satisfied the DSM-IV requirement for positive and differential diagnosis. However, many respondents failed to meet diagnostic criteria for duration, frequency and severity in the two classifications, suggesting that multidimensional measures are needed. CONCLUSIONS: A significant proportion of the population with sleep complaints do not fit into DSM-IV and ICSD classifications. Further efforts are needed to identify diagnostic criteria and dimensional measures that will lead to insomnia diagnoses and thus provide a more reliable, valid and clinically relevant classification.

11 Article Difficulty in resuming or inability to resume sleep and the links to daytime impairment: definition, prevalence and comorbidity. 2009

Ohayon, Maurice M. ·Stanford Sleep Epidemiology Research Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, 3430 W. Bayshore Road, Palo Alto, CA 94303, USA. mohayon@stanford.edu ·J Psychiatr Res · Pubmed #19261296.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To assess the chronicity and severity of nocturnal awakenings with difficulty resuming sleep (DRS), its value as an indicator of an ongoing sleep and/or mental disorder and, finally, how it affects on daytime functioning. METHODS: A cross-sectional telephone study was performed in the non-institutionalized general population of France, the United Kingdom, Germany, Italy and Spain. This representative sample of 22,740 non-institutionalized individuals aged 15 or over was interviewed on their sleeping habits, health, sleep and mental disorders. These five European countries totaled 245.1 million inhabitants. The evaluation of nocturnal awakenings with DRS included duration, frequency (per night, per week and in the previous months) and assessment scale of daytime functioning. DRS was defined as a complaint of difficulty in resuming or inability to resume sleep occurring at least three nights per week and lasting for at least one month. RESULTS: A total of 16.1% [95% CI: 15.6-16.6] of the sample had DRS. Prevalence was higher in women and increased with age. The average duration of DRS was 40 months. DRS individuals slept on average 30 min less than other subjects with insomnia symptoms and 60 min less than the rest of the sample. Painful physical conditions, anxiety and mood disorders were the most discriminative factors for individuals with DRS distinguishing them from other insomnia subjects and the rest of the sample. Daytime impairment was observed in 52.2% of DRS individuals compared to 32.8% in individuals with classical insomnia symptoms (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: (1) DRS affect a large segment of the population; (2) it is a good indicator of an ongoing sleep or mental disorder; (3) it has a stronger impact on daytime functioning than classical insomnia symptoms (OR: 4.7).