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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles by Jim Mintz
Based on 5 articles published since 2009
(Why 5 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Jim Mintz wrote the following 5 articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Impact of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia disorder on sleep and comorbid symptoms in military personnel: a randomized clinical trial. 2018

Taylor, Daniel J / Peterson, Alan L / Pruiksma, Kristi E / Hale, Willie J / Young-McCaughan, Stacey / Wilkerson, Allison / Nicholson, Karin / Litz, Brett T / Dondanville, Katherine A / Roache, John D / Borah, Elisa V / Brundige, Antoinette / Mintz, Jim / Anonymous1801193. ·Department of Psychology, University of North Texas, Denton, TX. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX. · Research and Development Service, South Texas Veterans Health Care System, San Antonio, TX. · Department of Psychology, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC. · Department of Medicine, Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center, Fort Hood, TX. · Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiological Research and Information Center, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA. · Department of Psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA. · Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Boston University, Boston, MA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX. ·Sleep · Pubmed #29618098.

ABSTRACT: Study Objectives: To compare the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTi) disorder and a Control condition on reducing insomnia and comorbid symptoms in a sample of active duty military personnel. Methods: Randomized clinical trial of 151 active duty US Army personnel at Fort Hood, Texas. Results: This study replicated Original (n = 66) findings (CBTi outperformed Control) in a follow-on sample (n = 85) on diary-assessed sleep efficiency (d = 1.04), total sleep time (d = 0.38), sleep latency (d = -0.93), number of awakenings (d = -0.56), wake time after sleep onset (d = -0.91), sleep quality (d = 1.00), and the Insomnia Severity Index (d = -1.36) in active duty soldiers. CBTi also outperformed Control in the combined sample (N = 151) on four of the five subscales of the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (d = -0.32 to -0.96) and the mental health subscale on the Veterans RAND 12-Item Health Survey (d = 0.37). Exploratory analyses also showed CBTi outperformed Control on nicotine (d = -0.22) and caffeine (d = -0.47) use reduction. Significant within-group differences were found for both groups on depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, but there was no group by time interaction for these symptoms or for use of hypnotics or alcohol. Conclusions: CBTi was an effective treatment for insomnia and comorbid symptoms including daytime fatigue, general mental health, nicotine, and caffeine use. Clinical Trial Registration: Clinicaltrials.gov; Identifier: NCT01549899; "Comparing Internet and In-Person Brief Cognitive Behavioral Therapy of Insomnia".

2 Article Internet and In-Person Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in Military Personnel: A Randomized Clinical Trial. 2017

Taylor, Daniel J / Peterson, Alan L / Pruiksma, Kristi E / Young-McCaughan, Stacey / Nicholson, Karin / Mintz, Jim / Anonymous3510905. ·Department of Psychology, University of North Texas, Denton, TX. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX. · Research and Development Service, South Texas Veterans Health Care System, San Antonio, TX. · Department of Psychology, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX. · Department of Medicine, Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center, Fort Hood, TX. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX. ·Sleep · Pubmed #28472528.

ABSTRACT: Study Objectives: Compare in-person and unguided Internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTi) with a minimal contact control condition in military personnel. Methods: A three-arm parallel randomized clinical trial of 100 active duty US Army personnel at Fort Hood, Texas. Internet and in-person CBTi were comparable, except for the delivery format. The control condition consisted of phone call assessments. Results: Internet and in-person CBTi performed significantly better than the control condition on diary-assessed sleep efficiency (d = 0.89 and 0.53, respectively), sleep onset latency (d = -0.68 and -0.53), number of awakenings (d = -0.42 and -0.54), wake time after sleep onset (d = -0.88 and -0.50), the Insomnia Severity Index (d = -0.98 and -0.51), and the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes About Sleep Scale (d = -1.12 and -0.54). In-person treatment was better than Internet treatment on self-reported sleep quality (d = 0.80) and dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep (d = -0.58). There were no differences on self-reported daytime sleepiness or actigraphy-assessed sleep parameters (except total sleep time; d = -0.55 to -0.60). There were technical difficulties with the Internet treatment which prevented tailored sleep restriction upward titration for some participants. Conclusions: Despite the unique, sleep-disrupting occupational demands of military personnel, in-person and Internet CBTi are efficacious treatments for this population. The effect sizes for in-person were consistently better than Internet and both were similar to those found in civilians. Dissemination of CBTi should be considered for maximum individual and population benefits, possibly in a stepped-care model.

3 Article Prospective Longitudinal Study of Predictors of Postpartum-Onset Depression in Women With a History of Major Depressive Disorder. 2017

Suri, Rita / Stowe, Zachary N / Cohen, Lee S / Newport, D Jeffrey / Burt, Vivien K / Aquino-Elias, Ana R / Knight, Bettina T / Mintz, Jim / Altshuler, Lori L. ·760 Westwood Plaza, Ste 28-251, Los Angeles, CA 90095-7057. rsuri03@gmail.com. · Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Jane and Terry Semel Institute of Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Departments of Psychiatry, Pediatrics, and Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA. · Perinatal and Reproductive Psychiatry Program, Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Departments of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences and Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Florida, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas, USA. ·J Clin Psychiatry · Pubmed #28297589.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Risk factors for postpartum depression in euthymic pregnant women with histories of major depressive disorder (MDD) were evaluated. METHODS: From April 2003 to March 2009, 343 pregnant women with a history of Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID)-diagnosed major depressive disorder were prospectively assessed from the third trimester into the postpartum period using the SCID mood module and 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). Data from 300 subjects who completed at least 2 mood module assessments (1 within 60 days before and the other within 60 days after delivery) were analyzed for predictive associations between variables assessed in the third trimester and the development of a postpartum depression. RESULTS: The majority of women were euthymic in pregnancy by SCID criteria. Women with third trimester SCID-diagnosed depression (n = 45) versus euthymia (n = 255) had a significantly higher risk for having depression after delivery (24% vs 11%, P = .013). For pregnant euthymic women, third trimester total HDRS scores significantly predicted postpartum depression (P < .0001); specifically, scores on 3 HDRS items alone-work activities, early insomnia, and suicidality-significantly predicted postpartum depression. Antidepressant use in the third trimester in euthymic women did not confer protection against the onset of postpartum depression. CONCLUSIONS: Among women with a history of MDD who are euthymic in the third trimester, 3 HDRS items-work activities, early insomnia, and suicidality-may be useful as screening items for clinicians working with pregnant women with histories of MDD to identify a group at risk for developing postpartum depression. Additionally, in euthymic women with a history of MDD, antidepressant use in the third trimester may not reduce the risk of developing postpartum depression.

4 Article Prevalence, Correlates, and Predictors of Insomnia in the US Army prior to Deployment. 2016

Taylor, Daniel J / Pruiksma, Kristi E / Hale, Willie J / Kelly, Kevin / Maurer, Douglas / Peterson, Alan L / Mintz, Jim / Litz, Brett T / Williamson, Douglas E / Anonymous2941093. ·Department of Psychology, University of North Texas, Denton, TX. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX. · Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center, Fort Hood, TX. · South Texas Veterans Healthcare System, San Antonio, TX. · Department of Psychology, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX. · Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MS. · Department of Psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC. · Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC. ·Sleep · Pubmed #27450687.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence, correlates, and predictors of insomnia in US Army personnel prior to deployment. METHODS: Cross-sectional cohort design assessing insomnia and other psychosocial variables in active duty service members (n = 4,101), at Fort Hood, Texas, prior to military deployment. Insomnia was defined as an Insomnia Severity Index ≥ 15. RESULTS: The prevalence of insomnia was 19.9%. Enlisted personnel were five times more likely to report insomnia than officers (odds ratio [OR] = 5.17). Insomnia was higher among American Indian/Alaskan Natives than other groups (ORs = 1.86-2.85). Those in the Insomnia Group were older, had longer military careers, and reported more marriages, children, and military deployments ( CONCLUSIONS: Insomnia occurs in about one of five service members prior to a military deployment and is associated with a wide array of psychosocial stressors and mental and physical health problems.

5 Article Residual sleep disturbances following PTSD treatment in active duty military personnel. 2016

Pruiksma, Kristi E / Taylor, Daniel J / Wachen, Jennifer Schuster / Mintz, Jim / Young-McCaughan, Stacey / Peterson, Alan L / Yarvis, Jeffrey S / Borah, Elisa V / Dondanville, Katherine A / Litz, Brett T / Hembree, Elizabeth A / Resick, Patricia A. ·Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. · Department of Psychology, University of North Texas. · National Center for PTSD, VA Boston Healthcare System. · Headquarters, Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center. · School of Social Work, University of Texas at Austin. · VA - Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center, VA Boston Healthcare System. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center. ·Psychol Trauma · Pubmed #27243567.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Sleep disturbances, including nightmares and insomnia, are frequently reported symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Insomnia is one of the most common symptoms to persist after evidence-based PTSD treatment. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of sleep disturbances in a sample of active duty military personnel before and after receiving therapy for PTSD in a clinical trial and to explore the associations of insomnia and nightmares with PTSD diagnosis after treatment. METHOD: Sleep parameters were evaluated with the PTSD Checklist in 108 active duty U.S. Army soldiers who had completed at least one deployment in support of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and who participated in a randomized clinical trial comparing Group Cognitive Processing Therapy-Cognitive Only Version with Group Present-Centered Therapy. RESULTS: Insomnia was the most frequently reported symptom before and after treatment, with 92% reporting insomnia at baseline and 74%-80% reporting insomnia at follow-up. Nightmares were reported by 69% at baseline and by 49%-55% at follow-up. Among participants who no longer met criteria for PTSD following treatment, 57% continued to report insomnia, but only 13% continued to report nightmares. At baseline, 54% were taking sleep medications, but sleep medication use did not affect the overall results. CONCLUSIONS: Insomnia was found to be one of the most prevalent and persistent problems among service members receiving PTSD treatment. Nightmares were relatively more positively responsive to treatment. For some service members with PTSD, the addition of specific treatments targeting insomnia and/or nightmares may be indicated. (PsycINFO Database Record