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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles by Habibolah Khazaie
Based on 11 articles published since 2009
(Why 11 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Habibolah Khazaie wrote the following 11 articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review A lack of consistent brain alterations in insomnia disorder: An activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis. 2018

Tahmasian, Masoud / Noori, Khadijeh / Samea, Fateme / Zarei, Mojtaba / Spiegelhalder, Kai / Eickhoff, Simon B / Van Someren, Eus / Khazaie, Habibolah / Eickhoff, Claudia R. ·Institute of Medical Science and Technology, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran. · Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. · Institute for Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran. · Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Centre - University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Germany. · Institute of Systems Neuroscience, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine University Düsseldorf, Germany; Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1; INM-7), Research Center Jülich, Jülich, Germany. · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Meibergdreef 47, 1105 Amsterdam BA, The Netherlands; Department of Psychiatry and Integrative Neurophysiology, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research (CNCR), Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, VU University and Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1187, 1081 Amsterdam HV, The Netherlands. · Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. Electronic address: hakhazaie@gmail.com. · Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1; INM-7), Research Center Jülich, Jülich, Germany; Institute of Clinical Neuroscience and Medical Psychology, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany. ·Sleep Med Rev · Pubmed #30093361.

ABSTRACT: Insomnia disorder is a prevalent sleep disorder, which affects about 10% of general population. However, its neural mechanisms are poorly understood. Recently, several structural and functional neuroimaging studies have been conducted in patients with insomnia disorder, but these studies have yielded diverse findings. Here, we aimed to identify consistent patterns of abnormal brain alterations in insomnia disorder by performing a quantitative coordinate-based meta-analysis. Following the preferred reporting for systematic reviews and meta-analyses statement, we searched PubMed database and used reference tracking and finally retrieved 19 eligible studies (six task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging, eight resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, three voxel-based morphometry, and two positron emission tomography). We extracted peak coordinates from these studies and tested for convergence using the activation likelihood estimation method. Using this method, we found no significant convergent evidence for combination of structural atrophy and functional disturbances across previous studies (p = 0.914). Inconsistencies across these studies might be related to heterogonous clinical populations, the explorative nature of these studies in combination with small sample sizes, different experimental designs, and various preprocessing and statistical approaches. Future neuroimaging studies on insomnia disorder should include larger well-characterized samples, as well as standard imaging and analysis protocols.

2 Review Paradoxical insomnia and subjective-objective sleep discrepancy: A review. 2018

Rezaie, Leeba / Fobian, Aaron D / McCall, William Vaughn / Khazaie, Habibolah. ·Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurobiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Health Behavior, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta University, Augusta, GA, USA. · Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. Electronic address: hakhazaie@gmail.com. ·Sleep Med Rev · Pubmed #29402512.

ABSTRACT: Paradoxical insomnia is characterized by discrepancy between subjective and objective assessments of sleep and is challenging to diagnosis and treat. Typically, polysomnographic (PSG) findings show significantly longer total sleep time than patients' report of sleep, and the difference between subjective and PSG sleep is greater than that seen in other insomnia subtypes. Subjective-objective sleep discrepancy may also present in different clinical pictures, as marked discrepancies between patients' perception of sleep and objective findings are common in a variety of medical, sleep and psychiatric disorders. However, there is a paucity of literature about the etiology and treatment of sleep discrepancy and paradoxical insomnia. Therefore, the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms of sleep discrepancy and paradoxical insomnia should be further investigated. Additionally, well-controlled clinical trials are needed to establish an evidence based intervention for treatment.

3 Review Functional reorganization in obstructive sleep apnoea and insomnia: A systematic review of the resting-state fMRI. 2017

Khazaie, Habibolah / Veronese, Mattia / Noori, Khadijeh / Emamian, Farnoosh / Zarei, Mojtaba / Ashkan, Keyoumars / Leschziner, Guy D / Eickhoff, Claudia R / Eickhoff, Simon B / Morrell, Mary J / Osorio, Ricardo S / Spiegelhalder, Kai / Tahmasian, Masoud / Rosenzweig, Ivana. ·Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS), Kermanshah, Iran. · Sleep and Brain Plasticity Centre, Department of Neuroimaging, IoPPN, King's College, London, UK. · Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS), Kermanshah, Iran; Department of Psychiatry, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · Institute of Medical Sciences and Technology, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran; School of Cognitive Sciences, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Tehran, Iran. · Sleep and Brain Plasticity Centre, Department of Neuroimaging, IoPPN, King's College, London, UK; Department of Neurosurgery, King's College Hospital, London, UK. · Sleep and Brain Plasticity Centre, Department of Neuroimaging, IoPPN, King's College, London, UK; Sleep Disorders Centre, Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK. · Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1), Research Center Jülich, Jülich, Germany; Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany. · Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1), Research Center Jülich, Jülich, Germany; Institute of Clinical Neuroscience & Medical Psychology, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany. · Academic Unit of Sleep and Breathing, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, UK and NIHR Respiratory Disease Biomedical Research Unit at the Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust,Sydney Street, London, SW3 6NP, UK. · Center for Brain Health, NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY, United States. · Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychophysiology/Sleep Medicine, Center for Mental Disorders, University of Freiburg Medical Center, Freiburg, Germany. · Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS), Kermanshah, Iran; Institute of Medical Sciences and Technology, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran; School of Cognitive Sciences, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Tehran, Iran. Electronic address: masoudtahmasian@gmail.com. ·Neurosci Biobehav Rev · Pubmed #28344075.

ABSTRACT: Functional neuroimaging techniques have accelerated progress in the study of sleep disorders. Considering the striking prevalence of these disorders in the general population, however, as well as their strong bidirectional relationship with major neuropsychiatric disorders, including major depressive disorder, their numbers are still surprisingly low. This review examines the contribution of resting state functional MRI to current understanding of two major sleep disorders, insomnia disorder and obstructive sleep apnoea. An attempt is made to learn from parallels of previous resting state functional neuroimaging findings in major depressive disorder. Moreover, shared connectivity biomarkers are suggested for each of the sleep disorders. Taken together, despite some inconsistencies, the synthesis of findings to date highlights the importance of the salience network in hyperarousal and affective symptoms in insomnia. Conversely, dysfunctional connectivity of the posterior default mode network appears to underlie cognitive and depressive symptoms of obstructive sleep apnoea.

4 Review Sleep disturbances in veterans with chronic war-induced PTSD. 2016

Khazaie, Habibolah / Ghadami, Mohammad Rasoul / Masoudi, Maryam. ·Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. Email: maryammasoudi27@yahoo.com. ·J Inj Violence Res · Pubmed #27093088.

ABSTRACT: Post-traumatic stress disorder is related to a wide range of medical problems, with a majority of neurological, psychological, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal disorders, diabetes, as well as sleep disorders. Although the majority of studies reveal the association between PTSD and sleep disturbances, there are few studies on the assessment of sleep disruption among veterans with PTSD. In this review, we attempt to study the sleep disorders including insomnia, nightmare, sleep-related breathing disorders, sleep-related movement disorders and parasomnias among veterans with chronic war-induced PTSD. It is an important area for further research among veterans with PTSD.

5 Article Validation of the Farsi version of the revised Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale (ASHSr): a cross-sectional study. 2017

Chehri, Azita / Khazaie, Habibolah / Eskandari, Soudabeh / Khazaie, Sepideh / Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith / Brand, Serge / Gerber, Markus. ·Department of Psychology, Kermanshah Branch, Islamic Azad University, Kermanshah, Iran. · Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS), Kermanshah, Iran. · University of Basel, Psychiatric Clinics (UKP), Center for Affective, Stress and Sleep Disorders (ZASS), Basel, Switzerland. · University of Basel, Department of Sport, Exercise and Health, Division of Sport and Psychosocial Health, St. Jakob-Turm, Birsstrasse 320B, 4052, Basel, Switzerland. · University of Basel, Department of Sport, Exercise and Health, Division of Sport and Psychosocial Health, St. Jakob-Turm, Birsstrasse 320B, 4052, Basel, Switzerland. markus.gerber@unibas.ch. ·BMC Psychiatry · Pubmed #29282019.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Restoring sleep is associated with a broad variety of favorable cognitive, emotional, social and behavioral benefits during the day. This holds particularly true for adolescents, as maturational, social, cognitive, emotional and behavioral changes might unfavorably impact on adolescents' sleep. Among adolescents, poor sleep hygiene practices are a potentially modifiable risk factor that can be addressed via appropriate interventions. Accordingly, having reliable and valid self-report measures to assess sleep hygiene practices is essential to gauge individual responses to behavioral interventions and evaluate sleep hygiene recommendations. The aim of the present study therefore was to translate and to test the psychometric properties (internal consistency, test-retest reliability, factorial and concurrent validity) of the Farsi/Persian version of the revised version of the Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale (ASHSr). METHOD: A total of 1013 adolescents (mean age: M = 15.4 years; SD = 1.2; range: 12-19 years; 42.9% females) completed the ASHSr and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) in their classroom during an official school lesson. Further, 20% completed the ASHSr 6 weeks later to evaluate the test-retest reliability. Cronbach's alpha coefficients were calculated to examine internal consistency, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to test factorial validity, whereas concurrent validity and test-retest reliability were examined via correlation analyses. RESULTS: A first-order confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) corroborated the six-factor structure of the ASHSr, including a physiological, behavioral arousal, cognitive/emotional, daytime sleep, sleep environment, and sleep stability factor. A second-order CFA showed that a higher-order sleep hygiene construct explained sufficient variance in each factor. Cronbach's alpha values ranged between .71 and .75, correlations for test-retest reliability between .82 and .87. Significant correlations were found between most ASHSr scales and the PSQI indices. However, the magnitude of these correlations was weak. CONCLUSIONS: The Farsi/Persian version of the Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale can be used as a reliable and valid tool for evaluation of sleep hygiene practices among Farsi/Persian-speaking adolescents.

6 Article PTSD-related paradoxical insomnia: an actigraphic study among veterans with chronic PTSD. 2015

Ghadami, Mohammad Rasoul / Khaledi-Paveh, Behnam / Nasouri, Marzieh / Khazaie, Habibolah. ·Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. E-mail: hakhazaie@gmail.com. ·J Inj Violence Res · Pubmed #25590695.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Sleep disturbance is a common self-reported complaint by PTSD patients. However, there are controversies in documenting objective indices of disrupted sleep in these patients. The aim of the present study was to assess sleep disturbances in veterans with chronic PTSD, using both subjective and objective assessments. METHODS: Thirty two PTSD patients with complaints of insomnia were evaluated using the Clinician Administrated PTSD Scale version 1 (CAPS) and completed the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) for subjective evaluation of their sleep. For objective evaluation, participants underwent two consecutive overnight actigraphic assessments. Total Sleep Time (TST), Sleep Latency (SL), Sleep Efficiency (SE) and Number of Awakening (NWAK) were measured in all participants. RESULTS: Participants underestimated TST (p less than 0.0001), SE (p less than 0.0001) as well as NASO (0.03) in the questionnaire compared to the actigraphic assessment and overestimated SL (p less than 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Objective sleep parameters do not adversely affect veterans with chronic PTSD. Self-reported sleep disturbance in these patients is not reliable and objective sleep assessments are necessary.

7 Article Insomnia treatment in the third trimester of pregnancy reduces postpartum depression symptoms: a randomized clinical trial. 2013

Khazaie, Habibolah / Ghadami, Mohammad Rasoul / Knight, David C / Emamian, Farnoosh / Tahmasian, Masoud. ·Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS), Kermanshah, Iran. ·Psychiatry Res · Pubmed #23993464.

ABSTRACT: Mental health is an important medical issue in perinatal care, and there is increasing evidence that insomnia during pregnancy is associated with postpartum depression (PPD). Therefore, the present study evaluated the effect of insomnia treatment during the third trimester of pregnancy on PPD symptoms. Fifty-four pregnant women with insomnia were randomly assigned to trazodone, diphenhydramine, or placebo treatment. Sleep quality was measured by actigraphy at baseline, and after 2 and 6 weeks of treatment. In addition, depression was assessed 2 and 6 weeks after delivery. Trazodone and diphenhydramine improved sleep profile compared to placebo after 6 weeks of treatment. Further, depressive symptoms were reduced 2 and 6 weeks after delivery in trazodone and diphenhydramine groups compared to placebo. No differences in depressive symptoms were observed between the trazodone and diphenhydramine groups. These findings indicate that insomnia treatment with trazodone or diphenhydramine during the third trimester of pregnancy may prevent PPD.

8 Article Treatment of paradoxical insomnia with atypical antipsychotic drugs. A comparison of olanzapine and risperidone. 2013

Khazaie, Habibolah / Rezaie, Leeba / Darvishi, Freshteh / Najafi, Farid / Avis, Kristin. ·Sleep Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. ·Neurosciences (Riyadh) · Pubmed #23291800.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy of 2 atypical anti-psychotic drugs, olanzapine and risperidone, in the treatment of paradoxical insomnia. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study over a 2-year period (September 2008 to September 2010), 29 patients with paradoxical insomnia, diagnosed in Kermanshah, Iran by both psychiatric interview and actigraphy, were randomly assigned to 2 groups. For 8 weeks, the first group (n=14) was treated with 10 mg olanzapine daily, and the second group (n=15) was treated with 4 mg risperidone daily. All participants completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Inventory (PSQI) at baseline and at the end of the study. RESULTS: As expected, a baseline actigraphy analysis showed that total sleep time was not significantly different between the 2 treatment groups (p<0.3). In both groups, sleep quality was improved (p<0.001) with treatment. When comparing the 2 treatments directions, a significant difference emerged (9.21+/-2.35, 6.07+/-4.46) among the 2 treatment groups based on data from the PSQI. Patients who were treated with olanzapine showed greater improvement than patients who were treated by risperidone (p<0.04). CONCLUSION: Atypical anti-psychotic drugs such as olanzapine and risperidone may be beneficial options for treatment of paradoxical insomnia. Larger clinical trials with longer periods of follow-up are needed for further investigation.

9 Article Insomnia treatment by olanzapine. Is sleep state misperception a psychotic disorder? 2010

Khazaie, Habibolah / Rezaie, Leeba / Tahmasian, Masoud / Schwebel, David C. ·Sleep Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. ha_khazaie@yahoo.com ·Neurosciences (Riyadh) · Pubmed #20672499.

ABSTRACT: Offering a new perspective on sleep state misperception, we discuss a patient who presented with sleep state misperception and was ultimately diagnosed with delusional disorder. A 60-year-old woman with chief complaints of insomnia, agitation, and suicidal ideation, was admitted to an inpatient psychiatric ward. Based on information from her family and a mental state examination, her primary diagnosis was sleep state misperception. She was treated with Trazodone. Because she was unresponsive to the treatment, a full psychiatric evaluation and wrist actigraphy report were undertaken, resulting in a revised diagnosis of delusional disorder. She was started on Olanzapine and, after 6 weeks was discharged with good improvement. Sleep state misperception might be considered not just as a sleep disorder, but also as a psychiatric disorder with psychotic symptoms. Further research is recommended.

10 Minor Reply to Hua Liu, HaiCun Shi and PingLei Pan: Coordinate based meta-analyses in a medium sized literature: Considerations, limitations and road ahead. 2018

Tahmasian, Masoud / Zarei, Mojtaba / Noori, Khadijeh / Khazaie, Habibolah / Samea, Fateme / Spiegelhalder, Kai / Eickhoff, Simon B / Van Someren, Eus / Eickhoff, Claudia R. ·Institute of Medical Science and Technology, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran. · Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. · Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. Electronic address: hakhazaie@gmail.com. · Institute for Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran. · Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Centre - University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Germany. · Institute of Systems Neuroscience, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine University Düsseldorf, Germany; Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1; INM-7), Research Center Jülich, Jülich, Germany. · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Meibergdreef 47, 1105 Amsterdam, BA, the Netherlands; Departments of Psychiatry and Integrative Neurophysiology, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research (CNCR), Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam UMC, De Boelelaan 1187, 1081 Amsterdam, HV, the Netherlands. · Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1; INM-7), Research Center Jülich, Jülich, Germany; Institute of Clinical Neuroscience and Medical Psychology, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany. ·Sleep Med Rev · Pubmed #30244921.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Minor Comments on: insomnia, postpartum depression and estradiol in women after delivery. 2018

Masoudi, Maryam / Khazaie, Habibolah / Ghadami, Mohammad Rasoul. ·Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, PO Box 6719851151, Kermanshah, Iran. · Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, PO Box 6719851151, Kermanshah, Iran. mr_ghadami@yahoo.com. ·Metab Brain Dis · Pubmed #29340844.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --