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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles by Shelli Kesler
Based on 4 articles published since 2009
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Shelli Kesler wrote the following 4 articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Management of side effects during and post-treatment in breast cancer survivors. 2018

Palesh, Oxana / Scheiber, Caroline / Kesler, Shelli / Mustian, Karen / Koopman, Cheryl / Schapira, Lidia. ·Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. · MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Surgery, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA. · Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA, USA. ·Breast J · Pubmed #28845551.

ABSTRACT: Cancer-related fatigue, insomnia, and cancer-related cognitive impairment are commonly experienced symptoms that share psychological and physical manifestations. One or more of these symptoms will affect nearly all patients at some point during their course of treatment or survivorship. These side effects are burdensome and reduce patients' quality of life well beyond their cancer diagnosis and associated care treatments. Cancer-related fatigue, insomnia, and cancer-related cognitive impairment are likely to have multiple etiologies that make it difficult to identify the most effective method to manage them. In this review, we summarized the information on cancer-related fatigue, insomnia, and cancer-related cognitive impairment incidence and prevalence among breast cancer patients and survivors as well as recent research findings on pharmaceutical, psychological, and exercise interventions that have shown effectiveness in the treatment of these side effects. Our review revealed that most current pharmaceutical interventions tend to ameliorate symptoms only temporarily without addressing the underlying causes. Exercise and behavioral interventions are consistently more effective at managing chronic symptoms and possibly address an underlying etiology. Future research is needed to investigate effective interventions that can be delivered directly in clinic to a large portion of patients and survivors.

2 Review Sleep disruption in hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients: prevalence, severity, and clinical management. 2014

Jim, Heather S L / Evans, Bryan / Jeong, Jiyeon M / Gonzalez, Brian D / Johnston, Laura / Nelson, Ashley M / Kesler, Shelli / Phillips, Kristin M / Barata, Anna / Pidala, Joseph / Palesh, Oxana. ·Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida. Electronic address: heather.jim@moffitt.org. · Department of Psychology, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California. · Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida. · Division of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California. · Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida; Psychiatry and Legal Medicine PhD Program, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida. ·Biol Blood Marrow Transplant · Pubmed #24747335.

ABSTRACT: Sleep disruption is common among hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients, with over 50% of recipients experiencing sleep disruption pre-transplant, with up to 82% of patients experiencing moderate to severe sleep disruption during hospitalization for transplant and up to 43% after transplant. These rates of sleep disruption are substantially higher than what we see in the general population. Although sleep disruption can be distressing to patients and contribute to diminished quality of life, it is rarely discussed during clinical visits. The goal of the current review is to draw attention to sleep disruption and disorders (ie, insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea, restless legs syndrome) as a clinical problem in HCT in order to facilitate patient education, intervention, and research. We identified 35 observational studies published in the past decade that examined sleep disruption or disorders in HCT. Most studies utilized a single item measure of sleep, had small sample size, and included heterogeneous samples of patients. Six studies of the effects of psychosocial and exercise interventions on sleep in HCT have reported no significant improvements. These results highlight the need for rigorous observational and interventional studies of sleep disruption and disorders in HCT recipients..

3 Clinical Trial Feasibility and acceptability of brief behavioral therapy for cancer-related insomnia: effects on insomnia and circadian rhythm during chemotherapy: a phase II randomised multicentre controlled trial. 2018

Palesh, Oxana / Scheiber, Caroline / Kesler, Shelli / Janelsins, Michelle C / Guido, Joseph J / Heckler, Charles / Cases, Mallory G / Miller, Jessica / Chrysson, Nick G / Mustian, Karen M. ·Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. opalesh@stanford.edu. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. · University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · University of Rochester Medical Center, James P. Wilmot Cancer Institute, Rochester, NY, USA. · Metro-Minnesota Community Oncology Research Consortium, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Novant Health Oncology Specialists, Winston-Salem, NC, USA. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #30026614.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: This phase II RCT was conducted to determine the feasibility and acceptability of brief behavioral therapy for cancer-related insomnia (BBT-CI) in breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. We also assessed the preliminary effects of BBT-CI on insomnia and circadian rhythm in comparison to a Healthy Eating Education Learning control condition (HEAL). METHODS: Of the 71 participants recruited, 34 were randomised to receive BBT-CI and 37 to receive HEAL. Oncology staff was trained to deliver the intervention in four community clinics affiliated with the NCI. Insomnia was assessed with the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), and circadian rhythm was assessed using a wrist-worn actiwatch. RESULTS: Community staff interveners delivered 72% of the intervention components, with a recruitment rate of 77% and an adherence rate of 73%, meeting acceptability and feasibility benchmarks. Those randomised to BBT-CI improved their ISI scores by 6.3 points compared to a 2.5-point improvement in those randomised to HEAL (P = 0.041). Actigraphy data indicated that circadian functioning improved in the BBT-CI arm as compared to the HEAL arm at post-intervention (all P-values <0.05). CONCLUSIONS: BBT-CI is an acceptable and feasible intervention that can be delivered directly in the community oncology setting by trained staff. The BBT-CI arm experienced significant improvements in insomnia and circadian rhythm as compared to the control condition.

4 Article Secondary outcomes of a behavioral sleep intervention: A randomized clinical trial. 2019

Palesh, Oxana / Scheiber, Caroline / Kesler, Shelli / Gevirtz, Richard / Heckler, Charles / Guido, Joseph J / Janelsins, Michelle / Cases, Mallory G / Tong, Bingjie / Miller, Jessica M / Chrysson, Nick G / Mustian, Karen. ·Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. · Department of Neuro-Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. · Alliant International University. · Department of Surgery, James P. Wilmot Cancer Institute, University of Rochester Medical Center. · Cancer Control Trials, Metro-Minnesota Community Oncology Research Consortium. · Hematology and Oncology, Novant Health Oncology Specialists. · James P. Wilmot Cancer Institute, Department of Surgery University of Rochester Medical Center. ·Health Psychol · Pubmed #30762399.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Nearly 80% of cancer patients struggle with insomnia, which is associated with decreased heart rate variability (HRV) and quality of life (QOL). The aim of this secondary analysis was to evaluate the possible effects of Brief Behavioral Therapy for Cancer-Related Insomnia (BBT-CI), delivered during chemotherapy visits, on QOL and HRV in patients with breast cancer (BC). METHOD: QOL and HRV data were obtained during a pilot clinical trial assessing the feasibility and effects of BBT-CI on insomnia. A total of 71 BC patients (mean age = 52.5 years) were randomly assigned to either BBT-CI or a healthy-eating control intervention (HEAL). BBT-CI and HEAL were delivered over 6 weeks (2 face-to-face sessions plus 4 phone calls) by trained staff at 4 National Cancer Institute-funded Community Oncology Research Program clinics. QOL was measured with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT-G) and HRV with the Firstbeat device at baseline and after intervention. RESULTS: There were significant improvements in QOL after intervention for BBT-CI (FACT-G, p = .009; FACT-B, p = .016; ANCOVA) and 5-min supine HRV measures (SDNN, p = .005; rMSSD, p = .004; HF, p = .009; ANCOVA) compared with HEAL. CONCLUSIONS: Patients randomized to BBT-CI showed improvements in QOL and HRV, providing support for BBT-CI's possible benefit when delivered in the community oncology setting by trained staff. A more definitive efficacy trial of BBT-CI is currently being planned with sufficient statistical power to evaluate the intervention's clinical utility. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).