Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles by Katherine A. Kaplan
Based on 4 articles published since 2008
||||

Between 2008 and 2019, Katherine A. Kaplan wrote the following 4 articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review An evidence-based review of insomnia treatment in early recovery. 2014

Kaplan, Katherine A / McQuaid, John / Primich, Charles / Rosenlicht, Nicholas. ·From the Department of Psychiatry (KAK), Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA · Department of Psychiatry (JM, NR), University of California, San Francisco · and San Francisco VA Medical Center (JM, CP, NR), San Francisco, CA. ·J Addict Med · Pubmed #25369938.

ABSTRACT: Accruing evidence indicates that insomnia is prevalent and persistent in early recovery from substance use disorders and may predict relapse. As such, insomnia treatment after abstinence represents an important area for intervention. This article reviews the literature on insomnia predicting new-onset alcohol and substance use disorders, along with evidence for insomnia predicting relapse in recovering populations. Pharmacological and psychological treatment options are presented, and cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia applied to recovering populations is described in detail.

2 Clinical Conference Behavioral treatment of insomnia in early recovery. 2014

Kaplan, Katherine A / McQuaid, John / Batki, Steven L / Rosenlicht, Nicholas. ·From the Department of Psychiatry (KAK), Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA · and Department of Psychiatry (JM, SLB, NR), University of California, and San Francisco VA Medical Center, San Francisco, CA. ·J Addict Med · Pubmed #25369939.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Article Prevalence and clinical correlates of co-occurring insomnia and hypersomnia symptoms in depression. 2014

Soehner, Adriane M / Kaplan, Katherine A / Harvey, Allison G. ·Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, USA; Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, USA. · Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Science, Stanford University Medical Center, USA. · Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, USA. Electronic address: aharvey@berkeley.edu. ·J Affect Disord · Pubmed #24953480.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The aim was to examine the prevalence and consequences of co-occurring insomnia and hypersomnia symptoms in depressed adults drawn from a representative sample of the U.S. population. METHOD: Data from 687 National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R) respondents meeting criteria for a major depressive episode (MDE) in the past year were included. Respondents completed clinical interviews that assessed 12-month DSM-IV disorders, impairment, mental health treatment, and depressive symptom severity. Outcomes were compared between respondents who experienced insomnia symptoms-only (N=404), hypersomnia symptoms-only (N=44), both insomnia and hypersomnia symptoms (N=184) and no sleep problems (N=55) during an MDE. RESULTS: Insomnia and hypersomnia symptoms co-occurred in 27.7% of respondents with past-year MDEs, most frequently in bipolar spectrum disorders and major depressive disorder with dysthymia. Similar to the insomnia-only group, respondents with co-occurring sleep disturbances had more severe depression, and higher rates of past-year impulse control disorders and suicide planning. Similar to the hypersomnia-only group, respondents with co-occurring sleep disturbances had higher rates of past-year drug use disorders and suicide attempts. Compared to the insomnia-only and no sleep problem groups, respondents with both sleep disturbances were more frequently in mental health treatment, seeing a general practitioner, and taking antidepressants. LIMITATIONS: The NCS-R is cross-sectional and did not evaluate sleep disorder diagnoses. CONCLUSIONS: Co-occurring insomnia and hypersomnia symptoms were associated with a more severe MDE. Further research is warranted to more fully understand the joint presentation of insomnia and hypersomnia in depression.

4 Article Behavioral treatment of insomnia in bipolar disorder. 2013

Kaplan, Katherine A / Harvey, Allison G. ·Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, USA. ·Am J Psychiatry · Pubmed #23820830.

ABSTRACT: Sleep disturbance is common in bipolar disorder. Stimulus control and sleep restriction are powerful, clinically useful behavioral interventions for insomnia, typically delivered as part of cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). Both involve short-term sleep deprivation. The potential for manic or hypomanic symptoms to emerge after sleep deprivation in bipolar disorder raises questions about the appropriateness of these methods for treating insomnia. In a series of patients with bipolar disorder who underwent behavioral treatment for insomnia, the authors found that regularizing bedtimes and rise times was often sufficient to bring about improvements in sleep. Two patients in a total group of 15 patients reported mild increases in hypomanic symptoms the week following instruction on stimulus control. Total sleep time did not change for these individuals. Two of five patients who underwent sleep restriction reported mild hypomania that was unrelated to weekly sleep duration. Sleep restriction and stimulus control appear to be safe and efficacious procedures for treating insomnia in patients with bipolar disorder. Practitioners should encourage regularity in bedtimes and rise times as a first step in treatment, and carefully monitor changes in mood and daytime sleepiness throughout the intervention.