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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles by Theodore M. Johnson
Based on 2 articles published since 2009
(Why 2 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, T. M. Johnson wrote the following 2 articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Differences in the Association of Nocturia and Functional Outcomes of Sleep by Age and Gender: A Cross-sectional, Population-based Study. 2016

Vaughan, Camille P / Fung, Constance H / Huang, Alison J / Johnson, Theodore M / Markland, Alayne D. ·Department of Veterans Affairs Birmingham/Atlanta Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Birmingham, Alabama; Department of Veterans Affairs Birmingham/Atlanta Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Atlanta, Georgia; Department of Medicine, Division of General Medicine and Geriatrics, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: camille.vaughan@emory.edu. · Department of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, North Hills, California; Department of Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, North Hills, California. · Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California. · Department of Veterans Affairs Birmingham/Atlanta Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Birmingham, Alabama; Department of Veterans Affairs Birmingham/Atlanta Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Atlanta, Georgia; Department of Medicine, Division of General Medicine and Geriatrics, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. · Department of Veterans Affairs Birmingham/Atlanta Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Birmingham, Alabama; Department of Veterans Affairs Birmingham/Atlanta Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Atlanta, Georgia; Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, Gerontology and Palliative Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama. ·Clin Ther · Pubmed #27751673.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Nocturia is associated with poor sleep quality; however, little is known about the relationship between nocturia and sleep quality across different workforce-relevant age groups of adults. This has implications for developing new treatment strategies that are well tolerated across populations. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study involving merged data from the 2005-2006 and 2007-2008 waves of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Participants responded to validated questions on nocturia frequency and sleep from the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire General Productivity subscale (FOSQ-gp, range 1-4). Analyses included multivariable linear regression with stratification by gender to examine associations between nocturia frequency (higher worse) and the FOSQ-gp scores (lower scores indicating worse daytime function related to sleep disturbance). FINDINGS: Of 10,512 adults aged ≥20 years who completed the survey, 9148 (87%) had complete nocturia and FOSQ-gp data. The population age-adjusted prevalence of nocturia at least twice nightly was 21.1% among men and 26.6% among women (P < 0.001), and nocturia increased with age (P < 0.001). Compared with those with no or 1 episode of nocturia, those with nocturia at least twice nightly reported lower mean FOSQ-gp scores (3.65; 95% CI, 3.61-3.69 vs 3.19; 95% CI, 3.09-3.31 for men and 3.52; 95% CI, 3.48-3.56 vs 3.09; 95% CI, 3.02-3.16 for women). Older adults (aged >65 years) with greater nocturia frequency reported worse FOSQ-gp scores compared with younger adults with similar nocturia frequency (P < 0.001 among men and women). IMPLICATIONS: In a population-based sample of community-dwelling men and women, the association between nocturia and worsened functional outcomes of sleep was greater among adults older than 65 years-a group more vulnerable to drug side effects, and in whom nocturia is typically multifactorial. Additionally, these analyses found that the association between nocturia and functional outcomes of sleep is stronger with increasing age among men. Effective treatment strategies that are well tolerated by older adults, such as multicomponent treatments that simultaneously address the combined effects of lower urinary tract and sleep dysfunction, are needed.

2 Article Self-rated sleep characteristics and bother from nocturia. 2012

Vaughan, C P / Eisenstein, R / Bliwise, D L / Endeshaw, Y K / Nagamia, Z J / Wolf, R A / Johnson, T M. ·Birmingham/Atlanta GRECC, Atlanta VA Medical Center, Decatur, GA, USA. epedigo@emory.edu ·Int J Clin Pract · Pubmed #22356249.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate if men with varying degrees of bother from a similar number of nocturia episodes differ with respect to self-rated sleep characteristics and fatigue. MATERIALS AND METHODS: As part of the baseline assessments during a nocturia treatment trial, 55 participants reported frequency and bother of nocturia using the AUA Symptom Inventory and completed 7-day sleep diaries prior to treatment. Participants who reported moderate nocturia (either two or three episodes nightly) were further grouped into categories of LOW (nocturia is no problem or a very small problem) or HIGH bother (nocturia is a big problem). Information from the participant completed sleep diaries was abstracted, including information on daytime napping, total sleep time, mean time needed to return to sleep, nighttime ratings of fatigue, and daytime ratings of fatigue. RESULTS: Of the 55 individuals who completed the pilot study, 24 study participants reported two or three episodes of nocturia and had either HIGH (n = 11) or LOW (n = 13) bother. Participants categorised with HIGH bother were significantly more likely than those with LOW bother to report difficulty initiating sleep (47.7 ± 34.4 vs. 23.5 ± 13.6 min, p = 0.05), difficulty returning to sleep after an awakening (28.9 ± 16.1 vs. 15.4 ± 9.6 min, p = 0.03) and greater morning fatigue (3.3 ± 0.7 vs. 2.5 ± 1.0, p = 0.04 on a 7-point scale). CONCLUSIONS: Since bother related to nocturia is linked to sleep quality, interventions targeting fatigue and sleep maintenance may provide useful targets in the management of nocturia in men.