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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles by Anna F. Johann
Based on 4 articles published since 2009
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Anna Johann wrote the following 4 articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review The effectiveness of behavioural and cognitive behavioural therapies for insomnia on depressive and fatigue symptoms: A systematic review and network meta-analysis. 2018

Ballesio, Andrea / Aquino, Maria Raisa Jessica V / Feige, Bernd / Johann, Anna F / Kyle, Simon D / Spiegelhalder, Kai / Lombardo, Caterina / Rücker, Gerta / Riemann, Dieter / Baglioni, Chiara. ·Department of Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy. · School of Health Sciences, City, University of London, UK. · Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychophysiology/Sleep Medicine, Center for Mental Disorders, Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. · Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute, University of Oxford, UK. · Institute for Medical Biometry and Statistics, Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Germany. · Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychophysiology/Sleep Medicine, Center for Mental Disorders, Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. Electronic address: chiara.baglioni@uniklinik-freiburg.de. ·Sleep Med Rev · Pubmed #28619248.

ABSTRACT: This review aimed to assess the impact of behavioural therapy for insomnia administered alone (BT-I) or in combination with cognitive techniques (cognitive-behavioural therapy for insomnia, CBT-I) on depressive and fatigue symptoms using network meta-analysis. PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science were searched from 1986 to May 2015. Studies were included if they incorporated sleep restriction, a core technique of BT-I treatment, and an adult insomnia sample, a control group and a standardised measure of depressive and/or fatigue symptoms. Face-to-face, group, self-help and internet therapies were all considered. Forty-seven studies were included in the meta-analysis. Eleven classes of treatment or control conditions were identified in the network. Cohen's d at 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated to assess the effect sizes of each treatment class as compared with placebo. Results showed significant effects for individual face-to-face CBT-I on depressive (d = 0.34, 95% CI: 0.06-0.63) but not on fatigue symptoms, with high heterogeneity between studies. The source of heterogeneity was not identified even after including sex, age, comorbidity and risk of bias in sensitivity analyses. Findings highlight the need to reduce variability between study methodologies and suggest potential effects of individual face-to-face CBT-I on daytime symptoms.

2 Article Insomnia as a predictor of mental disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis. 2019

Hertenstein, Elisabeth / Feige, Bernd / Gmeiner, Tabea / Kienzler, Christian / Spiegelhalder, Kai / Johann, Anna / Jansson-Fröjmark, Markus / Palagini, Laura / Rücker, Gerta / Riemann, Dieter / Baglioni, Chiara. ·University Psychiatric Services Bern (UPD), Bern, Switzerland. Electronic address: elisabeth.hertenstein@upd.ch. · Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine University of Freiburg, Germany. · Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Sweden. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Pisa, Italy. · Institute for Medical Biometry and Statistics, Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine University of Freiburg, Germany. ·Sleep Med Rev · Pubmed #30537570.

ABSTRACT: Previous research has identified insomnia as a predictor for the onset of depression. The aim of this meta-analysis is to investigate whether insomnia also predicts the onset of other mental disorders. Longitudinal studies were eligible for inclusion if they investigated insomnia at baseline (including nighttime- and daytime-symptoms) as a predictor of the later onset of psychopathology within a follow-up time-frame of at least 12 mo. Thirteen primary studies were included. The results suggest that insomnia is a significant predictor for the onset of depression (10 studies, OR 2.83, CI 1.55-5.17), anxiety (six studies, OR 3.23, CI 1.52-6.85), alcohol abuse (two studies, OR 1.35, CI 1.08-1.67, and psychosis (one study, OR 1.28, CI 1.03-1.59). The overall risk of bias in the primary studies was moderate. This meta-analysis provides evidence that insomnia increases the risk for psychopathology. A future research agenda should include more prospective studies using established diagnostic criteria, assessing insomnia at baseline and including long-term follow-up intervals evaluating a wider range of mental disorders. In addition, prospective long-term interventional studies investigating the efficacy of insomnia treatment for the prevention of mental disorders are called for.

3 Article Perfectionism and Polysomnography-Determined Markers of Poor Sleep. 2017

Johann, Anna F / Hertenstein, Elisabeth / Kyle, Simon D / Baglioni, Chiara / Feige, Bernd / Nissen, Christoph / Riemann, Dieter / Spiegelhalder, Kai. ·Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Germany. · Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Germany. · Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute (SCNi), Nuffield Department of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Oxford, United Kingdom. ·J Clin Sleep Med · Pubmed #28992830.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVES: Perfectionism has been suggested to represent a predisposing factor for poor sleep. However, previous studies have relied on self-reported measures. The association between perfectionism and poor sleep measured by polysomnography (PSG) warrants further investigation. METHODS: The current retrospective exploratory study used the Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale and PSG in an unselected sample of 334 consecutive sleep laboratory patients (140 males, 194 females, 44.6 ± 15.9 years). Data were analyzed using linear regression analyses. RESULTS: High levels of perfectionism were associated with PSG-determined markers of poor sleep in the first sleep laboratory night. The total Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale score was significantly associated with the number of nocturnal awakenings in the first sleep laboratory night. The subscales "concern over mistakes" and "personal standards" of perfectionism were significantly associated with markers of poor sleep. In contrast, there were only a few associations between perfectionism and PSG variables of the second sleep laboratory night. CONCLUSIONS: This pattern of results suggests that high levels of perfectionism may predispose individuals to sleep disturbances in the context of acute stressors. Thus, the influence of perfectionism on poor sleep should be further investigated to improve treatment.

4 Article Insomnia with objective short sleep duration is associated with longer duration of insomnia in the Freiburg Insomnia Cohort compared to insomnia with normal sleep duration, but not with hypertension. 2017

Johann, Anna F / Hertenstein, Elisabeth / Kyle, Simon D / Baglioni, Chiara / Feige, Bernd / Nissen, Christoph / McGinness, Alastair J / Riemann, Dieter / Spiegelhalder, Kai. ·Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. · Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. · Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute (SCNi), Nuffield Department of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #28746413.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVES: To replicate the association between insomnia with objective short sleep duration and hypertension, type 2 diabetes and duration of insomnia. DESIGN: Retrospective case-control study. SETTING: Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Center-University of Freiburg. PARTICIPANTS: 328 patients with primary insomnia classified according to DSM-IV criteria (125 males, 203 females, 44.3 ± 12.2 years). INTERVENTIONS: N/A. MEASUREMENTS: All participants were investigated using polysomnography, blood pressure measurements, and fasting routine laboratory. RESULTS: Insomnia patients with short sleep duration (< 6 hours) in the first night of laboratory sleep presented with a longer duration of insomnia compared to those with normal sleep duration (≥ 6 hours) in the first night of laboratory sleep. Insomnia patients who were categorised as short sleepers in either night were not more likely to suffer from hypertension (systolic blood pressure of ≥ 140 mm Hg, diastolic blood pressure of ≥ 90 mm Hg, or a previously established diagnosis). Data analysis showed that insomnia patients with objective short sleep duration were not more likely to suffer from type 2 diabetes (fasting plasma glucose level of ≥ 126 mg/dl, or a previously established diagnosis). However, the diabetes analysis was only based on a very small number of diabetes cases. As a new finding, insomnia patients who were categorised as short sleepers in either night presented with increases in liver enzyme levels. CONCLUSIONS: The finding on insomnia duration supports the concept of two distinct sub-groups of insomnia, namely insomnia with, and without, objectively determined short sleep duration. However, our data challenges previous findings that insomnia patients with short sleep duration are more likely to suffer from hypertension.