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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles by Rachel J. Hundley
Based on 3 articles published since 2009
(Why 3 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, R. Hundley wrote the following 3 articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Characterizing Sleep in Adolescents and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders. 2017

Goldman, S E / Alder, M L / Burgess, H J / Corbett, B A / Hundley, R / Wofford, D / Fawkes, D B / Wang, L / Laudenslager, M L / Malow, B A. ·Sleep Disorders Division, Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 1161 21st Avenue South, Room A-0116, Nashville, TN, 37232-2551, USA. · Departments of Behavioral Sciences & Internal Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Kennedy Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, USA. · Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, USA. · Behavioral Immunology and Endocrinology Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Denver, CO, USA. · Sleep Disorders Division, Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 1161 21st Avenue South, Room A-0116, Nashville, TN, 37232-2551, USA. beth.malow@vanderbilt.edu. ·J Autism Dev Disord · Pubmed #28286917.

ABSTRACT: We studied 28 adolescents/young adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and 13 age/sex matched individuals of typical development (TD). Structured sleep histories, validated questionnaires, actigraphy (4 weeks), and salivary cortisol and melatonin (4 days each) were collected. Compared to those with TD, adolescents/young adults with ASD had longer sleep latencies and more difficulty going to bed and falling asleep. Morning cortisol, evening cortisol, and the morning-evening difference in cortisol did not differ by diagnosis (ASD vs. TD). Dim light melatonin onsets (DLMOs) averaged across participants were not different for the ASD and TD participants. Average participant scores indicated aspects of poor sleep hygiene in both groups. Insomnia in ASD is multifactorial and not solely related to physiological factors.

2 Article Relationship Between Subtypes of Restricted and Repetitive Behaviors and Sleep Disturbance in Autism Spectrum Disorder. 2016

Hundley, Rachel J / Shui, Amy / Malow, Beth A. ·Division of Developmental Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 11101 Doctors' Office Tower, Nashville, TN, 37232-9003, USA. Rachel.j.hundley@vanderbilt.edu. · Biostatistics Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, 50 Staniford St, Suite 560, Boston, MA, 02114-2540, USA. · Sleep Disorders Division, Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, A-0118 MCN, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, 37232, USA. ·J Autism Dev Disord · Pubmed #27511195.

ABSTRACT: We examined the association of two types of restricted and repetitive behaviors, repetitive sensory motor (RSM) and insistence on sameness (IS), with sleep problems in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants included 532 children (aged 2-17) who participated in the Autism Speaks Autism Treatment Network research registry. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised detected the presence of RSM and IS. RSM behaviors were positively associated with parent-reported sleep problems, and this relationship remained significant after controlling for anxiety symptoms. IS was not significantly associated with sleep problems. Better understanding of the relationship between specific types of repetitive behaviors and sleep problems may allow providers to tailor interventions to the individual presentations of their patients with ASD.

3 Article Parent-based sleep education for children with autism spectrum disorders. 2014

Malow, Beth A / Adkins, Karen W / Reynolds, Ann / Weiss, Shelly K / Loh, Alvin / Fawkes, Diane / Katz, Terry / Goldman, Suzanne E / Madduri, Niru / Hundley, Rachel / Clemons, Traci. ·Sleep Disorders Division, Department of Neurology and Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 1161 21st Avenue South, Room A-0116, Nashville, TN, 37232, USA, beth.malow@vanderbilt.edu. ·J Autism Dev Disord · Pubmed #23754339.

ABSTRACT: This study provided sleep education to parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to determine whether an individual or group format was more effective in improving sleep and aspects of daytime behavior and family functioning. Eighty children, ages 2-10 years, with ASD and sleep onset delay completed the study. Actigraphy and parent questionnaires were collected at baseline and 1 month after treatment. Mode of education did not affect outcomes. Sleep latency, insomnia subscales on the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire, and other outcomes related to child and family functioning improved with treatment. Parent-based sleep education, delivered in relatively few sessions, was associated with improved sleep onset delay in children with ASD. Group versus individualized education did not affect outcome.