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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles by Suzanne E. Goldman
Based on 9 articles published since 2010
(Why 9 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, S. Goldman wrote the following 9 articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline A practice pathway for the identification, evaluation, and management of insomnia in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders. 2012

Malow, Beth A / Byars, Kelly / Johnson, Kyle / Weiss, Shelly / Bernal, Pilar / Goldman, Suzanne E / Panzer, Rebecca / Coury, Daniel L / Glaze, Dan G / Anonymous1500741. ·Departments of Neurology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. beth.malow@vanderbilt.edu ·Pediatrics · Pubmed #23118242.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This report describes the development of a practice pathway for the identification, evaluation, and management of insomnia in children and adolescents who have autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). METHODS: The Sleep Committee of the Autism Treatment Network (ATN) developed a practice pathway, based on expert consensus, to capture best practices for an overarching approach to insomnia by a general pediatrician, primary care provider, or autism medical specialist, including identification, evaluation, and management. A field test at 4 ATN sites was used to evaluate the pathway. In addition, a systematic literature review and grading of evidence provided data regarding treatments of insomnia in children who have neurodevelopmental disabilities. RESULTS: The literature review revealed that current treatments for insomnia in children who have ASD show promise for behavioral/educational interventions and melatonin trials. However, there is a paucity of evidence, supporting the need for additional research. Consensus among the ATN sleep medicine committee experts included: (1) all children who have ASD should be screened for insomnia; (2) screening should be done for potential contributing factors, including other medical problems; (3) the need for therapeutic intervention should be determined; (4) therapeutic interventions should begin with parent education in the use of behavioral approaches as a first-line approach; (5) pharmacologic therapy may be indicated in certain situations; and (6) there should be follow-up after any intervention to evaluate effectiveness and tolerance of the therapy. Field testing of the practice pathway by autism medical specialists allowed for refinement of the practice pathway. CONCLUSIONS: The insomnia practice pathway may help health care providers to identify and manage insomnia symptoms in children and adolescents who have ASD. It may also provide a framework to evaluate the impact of contributing factors on insomnia and to test the effectiveness of nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatment strategies for the nighttime symptoms and daytime functioning and quality of life in ASD.

2 Article Characterizing Sleep in Adolescents and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders. 2017

Goldman, S E / Alder, M L / Burgess, H J / Corbett, B A / Hundley, R / Wofford, D / Fawkes, D B / Wang, L / Laudenslager, M L / Malow, B A. ·Sleep Disorders Division, Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 1161 21st Avenue South, Room A-0116, Nashville, TN, 37232-2551, USA. · Departments of Behavioral Sciences & Internal Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Kennedy Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, USA. · Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, USA. · Behavioral Immunology and Endocrinology Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Denver, CO, USA. · Sleep Disorders Division, Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 1161 21st Avenue South, Room A-0116, Nashville, TN, 37232-2551, USA. beth.malow@vanderbilt.edu. ·J Autism Dev Disord · Pubmed #28286917.

ABSTRACT: We studied 28 adolescents/young adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and 13 age/sex matched individuals of typical development (TD). Structured sleep histories, validated questionnaires, actigraphy (4 weeks), and salivary cortisol and melatonin (4 days each) were collected. Compared to those with TD, adolescents/young adults with ASD had longer sleep latencies and more difficulty going to bed and falling asleep. Morning cortisol, evening cortisol, and the morning-evening difference in cortisol did not differ by diagnosis (ASD vs. TD). Dim light melatonin onsets (DLMOs) averaged across participants were not different for the ASD and TD participants. Average participant scores indicated aspects of poor sleep hygiene in both groups. Insomnia in ASD is multifactorial and not solely related to physiological factors.

3 Article The Pediatric Sleep Clinical Global Impressions Scale-A New Tool to Measure Pediatric Insomnia in Autism Spectrum Disorders. 2016

Malow, Beth A / Connolly, Heidi V / Weiss, Shelly K / Halbower, Ann / Goldman, Suzanne / Hyman, Susan L / Katz, Terry / Madduri, Niru / Shui, Amy / Macklin, Eric / Reynolds, Ann M. ·*Sleep Disorders Division, Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN; †Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY; ‡Department of Neurology, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON; §Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO; ‖Biostatistics Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. ·J Dev Behav Pediatr · Pubmed #27244298.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To pilot a clinician-based outcome measure that provides complementary information to objective measures and parent-based questionnaires for insomnia in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). METHOD: The authors developed a Pediatric Sleep Clinical Global Impressions Scale (CGI). Questions included (1) the child's ability to fall asleep and remain sleeping independently (i.e., apart from parents); (2) bedtime resistance; (3) sleep onset delay; (4) night awakening; (5) parental satisfaction with their child's current sleep patterns; (6) family functioning as affected by their child's current sleep patterns; and (7) clinician's overall concern with the child's sleep. After refining the instrument through the evaluation of vignettes by ASD and sleep experts, the authors piloted the Pediatric Sleep CGI in a 12-week randomized trial of iron supplementation in children with ASD. Clinicians completed Pediatric Sleep CGIs and structured sleep histories, parents completed the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ), and children wore actigraphy watches. RESULTS: In repeated measures models, the Pediatric Sleep CGI and CSHQ were correlated for sleep onset delay (r = .66, p < .001), night wakings (r = .40, p < .001), and total score (r = .29, p < .001). The CGI-S sleep onset delay and actigraphy sleep onset delay scores (r = .75, p = .0095) were also correlated. The overall CGI-S showed improvement with therapy (p = .047). CONCLUSION: The Pediatric Sleep CGI shows promise in measuring clinician-rated outcomes in pediatric insomnia in children with ASD. Larger samples will be necessary to examine reliability, validity, and measure to change, as well as applicability to other populations with pediatric insomnia.

4 Article Melatonin in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: How Does the Evidence Fit Together? 2015

Veatch, Olivia J / Goldman, Suzanne E / Adkins, Karen W / Malow, Beth A. ·Sleep Disorders Division, Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA. · South Sound Pulmonary & Sleep Medicine, Olympia, WA, USA. ·J Nat Sci · Pubmed #26120597.

ABSTRACT: Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are prevalent neurodevelopmental conditions, affecting 1 in 68 children in the United States alone. Sleep disturbance, particularly insomnia, is very common in children diagnosed with ASD, with evidence supporting overlapping neurobiological and genetic underpinnings. One of the most well studied mechanisms related to ASD and insomnia is dysregulation of the melatonin pathway, which has been observed in many individuals with ASD compared to typically developing controls. Furthermore, variation in genes whose products regulate endogenous melatonin modify sleep patterns in humans and have also been implicated in some cases of ASD. However, the relationship between comorbid insomnia, melatonin processing, and genes that regulate endogenous melatonin levels in ASD is complex and requires further study to fully elucidate. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current findings related to the effects of genetic variation in the melatonergic pathway on risk for expression of sleep disorders in children with ASD. In addition, functional findings related to endogenous levels of melatonin and pharmacokinetic profiles in this patient population are evaluated.

5 Article Association between sleep duration and mortality is mediated by markers of inflammation and health in older adults: the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study. 2015

Hall, Martica H / Smagula, Stephen F / Boudreau, Robert M / Ayonayon, Hilsa N / Goldman, Suzanne E / Harris, Tamara B / Naydeck, Barbara L / Rubin, Susan M / Samuelsson, Laura / Satterfield, Suzanne / Stone, Katie L / Visser, Marjolein / Newman, Anne B. ·Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA. · Graduate School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. · Departments of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. · Laboratory of Epidemiology, Demography and Biometry, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Aging, Bethesda, MD. · Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. · Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Tennessee, Memphis, TN. · San Francisco Coordinating Center, California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, San Francisco, CA. · Institute of Health Sciences, VU University Medical Center and EMGO Institute, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Graduate School of Public Health, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. ·Sleep · Pubmed #25348127.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVES: Inflammation may represent a common physiological pathway linking both short and long sleep duration to mortality. We evaluated inflammatory markers as mediators of the relationship between sleep duration and mortality in community-dwelling older adults. DESIGN: Prospective cohort with longitudinal follow-up for mortality outcomes. SETTING: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Memphis, Tennessee. PARTICIPANTS: Participants in the Health, Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) Study (mean age 73.6 ± 2.9 years at baseline) were sampled and recruited from Medicare listings. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Baseline measures of subjective sleep duration, markers of inflammation (serum interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and C-reactive protein) and health status were evaluated as predictors of all-cause mortality (average follow-up = 8.2 ± 2.3 years). Sleep duration was related to mortality, and age-, sex-, and race-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) were highest for those with the shortest (< 6 h HR: 1.30, CI: 1.05-1.61) and longest (> 8 h HR: 1.49, CI: 1.15-1.93) sleep durations. Adjustment for inflammatory markers and health status attenuated the HR for short (< 6 h) sleepers (HR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.83-1.34). Age-, sex-, and race-adjusted HRs for the > 8-h sleeper group were less strongly attenuated by adjustment for inflammatory markers than by other health factors associated with poor sleep with adjusted HR = 1.23, 95% CI = 0.93-1.63. Inflammatory markers remained significantly associated with mortality. CONCLUSION: Inflammatory markers, lifestyle, and health status explained mortality risk associated with short sleep, while the mortality risk associated with long sleep was explained predominantly by lifestyle and health status.

6 Article Melatonin in children with autism spectrum disorders: endogenous and pharmacokinetic profiles in relation to sleep. 2014

Goldman, Suzanne E / Adkins, Karen W / Calcutt, M Wade / Carter, Melissa D / Goodpaster, Robert L / Wang, Lily / Shi, Yaping / Burgess, Helen J / Hachey, David L / Malow, Beth A. ·Departments of Neurology and Pediatrics Burry Chair in Cognitive Childhood Development, Sleep Disorders Division, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 1161 21st Avenue South, Room A-0116, Nashville, TN, 37232-2551, USA. ·J Autism Dev Disord · Pubmed #24752680.

ABSTRACT: Supplemental melatonin has been used to treat sleep onset insomnia in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), although the mechanism of action is uncertain. We assessed endogenous and supplemental melatonin profiles in relation to sleep in nine children with ASD. In endogenous samples, maximal melatonin concentration (C(max)) and time to peak concentration (T(max)) were comparable to those previously published in the literature for typically developing children, and dim light melatonin onsets were captured in the majority of children. In treatment samples (supplemental melatonin), melatonin parameters were also comparable to those previously published for typically developing children. Our findings support that children with ASD and insomnia responsive to low dose melatonin treatment have relatively normal profiles of endogenous and supplemental melatonin.

7 Article Parent-based sleep education for children with autism spectrum disorders. 2014

Malow, Beth A / Adkins, Karen W / Reynolds, Ann / Weiss, Shelly K / Loh, Alvin / Fawkes, Diane / Katz, Terry / Goldman, Suzanne E / Madduri, Niru / Hundley, Rachel / Clemons, Traci. ·Sleep Disorders Division, Department of Neurology and Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 1161 21st Avenue South, Room A-0116, Nashville, TN, 37232, USA, beth.malow@vanderbilt.edu. ·J Autism Dev Disord · Pubmed #23754339.

ABSTRACT: This study provided sleep education to parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to determine whether an individual or group format was more effective in improving sleep and aspects of daytime behavior and family functioning. Eighty children, ages 2-10 years, with ASD and sleep onset delay completed the study. Actigraphy and parent questionnaires were collected at baseline and 1 month after treatment. Mode of education did not affect outcomes. Sleep latency, insomnia subscales on the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire, and other outcomes related to child and family functioning improved with treatment. Parent-based sleep education, delivered in relatively few sessions, was associated with improved sleep onset delay in children with ASD. Group versus individualized education did not affect outcome.

8 Article Effects of a standardized pamphlet on insomnia in children with autism spectrum disorders. 2012

Adkins, Karen W / Molloy, Cindy / Weiss, Shelly K / Reynolds, Ann / Goldman, Suzanne E / Burnette, Courtney / Clemons, Traci / Fawkes, Diane / Malow, Beth A. ·Sleep Disorders Division, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA. ·Pediatrics · Pubmed #23118244.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Sleep difficulties are common reasons why parents seek medical intervention in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). We determined whether a pamphlet alone could be used by parents to help their child's insomnia. METHODS: Thirty-six children with ASD, ages 2 to 10 years, were enrolled. All had prolonged sleep latency confirmed by actigraphy showing a mean sleep latency of 30 minutes or more. Parents were randomly assigned to receive the sleep education pamphlet or no intervention. Children wore an actigraphy device to record baseline sleep parameters, with the primary outcome variable being change in sleep latency. Actigraphy data were collected a second time 2 weeks after the parent received the randomization assignment and analyzed by using Student's t test. Parents were also asked a series of questions to gather information about the pamphlet and its usefulness. RESULTS: Although participants randomized to the 2 arms did not differ statistically in age, gender, socioeconomic status, total Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire score, or actigraphy parameters, some differences may be large enough to affect results. Mean change in sleep-onset latency did not differ between the randomized groups (pamphlet versus no pamphlet). Parents commented that the pamphlet contained good information, but indicated that it would have been more useful to be given specific examples of how to take the information and put it into practice. CONCLUSIONS: A sleep education pamphlet did not appear to improve sleep latency in children with ASDs.

9 Article Sleep in children and adolescents with Angelman syndrome: association with parent sleep and stress. 2012

Goldman, S E / Bichell, T J / Surdyka, K / Malow, B A. ·Sleep Disorders Program, Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232-2551, USA. suzgoldman@gmail.com ·J Intellect Disabil Res · Pubmed #22044653.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Sleep concerns are common in children with Angelman syndrome, with 20-80% of individuals having a decreased sleep need and/or abnormal sleep-wake cycles. The impact of these sleep behaviours on parental sleep and stress is not known. METHOD: Through the use of standardised questionnaires, wrist actigraphy and polysomnography, we defined the sleep behaviours of 15 children/adolescents with Angelman syndrome and the association of the child/adolescents sleep behaviours on parental sleep behaviours and parental stress. RESULTS: Both children/adolescents and their parents exhibited over 1 h of wake time after sleep onset and fragmented sleep. Prolonged sleep latency in the child was associated with parent insomnia and daytime sleepiness. Additionally, variability in child total sleep time was associated with parental stress. CONCLUSIONS: Poor sleep in children/adolescents with Angelman syndrome was associated with poor parental sleep and higher parental stress. Further work is warranted to identify the underlying causes of the poor sleep, and to relate these findings to daytime functioning, behaviour and the family unit.