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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles by Polina Eidelman
Based on 7 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Polina Eidelman wrote the following 7 articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Impact of comorbid anxiety and depressive disorders on treatment response to cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia. 2016

Bélanger, Lynda / Harvey, Allison G / Fortier-Brochu, Émilie / Beaulieu-Bonneau, Simon / Eidelman, Polina / Talbot, Lisa / Ivers, Hans / Hein, Kerrie / Lamy, Manon / Soehner, Adriane M / Mérette, Chantal / Morin, Charles M. ·École de psychologie, Université Laval and Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec. · Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley. · École de psychologie, Université Laval and Institut Universitaire en Santé Mentale de Québec. · Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh. · Département de psychiatrie et de neurosciences, Université Laval and Centre de recherche de l'Institut Universitaire en Santé Mentale de Québec. · École de psychologie, Université Laval and Centre de recherche de l'Institut Universitaire en Santé Mentale de Québec. ·J Consult Clin Psychol · Pubmed #26963600.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of comorbid anxiety or depressive disorders on treatment response to cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) for insomnia, behavior therapy (BT), or cognitive therapy (CT). METHOD: Participants were 188 adults (117 women; Mage = 47.4 years) with chronic insomnia, including 45 also presenting a comorbid anxiety or mild to moderate depressive disorder. They were randomized to BT (n = 63), CT (n = 65), or CBT (n = 60). Outcome measures were the proportion of treatment responders (decrease of ≥8 points on the Insomnia Severity Index; ISI) and remissions (ISI score < 8) and depression and anxiety symptoms. RESULTS: Proportion of treatment responders and remitters in the CBT condition was not significantly different between the subgroups with and without comorbidity. However, the proportion of responders was lower in the comorbidity subgroup compared to those without comorbidity in both the BT (34.4% vs. 81.6%; p = .007) and CT (23.6% vs. 57.6%; p = .02) alone conditions, although remission rates and prepost ISI change scores were not. Pre to post change scores on the depression (-10.6 vs. -3.9; p < .001) and anxiety measures (-9.2 vs. -2.5; p = .01) were significantly greater in the comorbidity subgroup relative to the subgroup without comorbidity but only for those treated with the full CBT; no difference was found for those treated with either BT or CT alone. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of a comorbid anxiety or mild to moderate depressive disorder did not reduce the efficacy of CBT for insomnia, but it did for its single BT and CT components when used alone. (PsycINFO Database Record

2 Article Change in Dysfunctional Beliefs About Sleep in Behavior Therapy, Cognitive Therapy, and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia. 2016

Eidelman, Polina / Talbot, Lisa / Ivers, Hans / Bélanger, Lynda / Morin, Charles M / Harvey, Allison G. ·Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Science Center. · San Francisco VA Medical Center. · Université Laval. · University of California, Berkeley. Electronic address: aharvey@berkeley.edu. ·Behav Ther · Pubmed #26763501.

ABSTRACT: As part of a larger randomized controlled trial, 188 participants were randomized to behavior therapy (BT), cognitive therapy (CT), or cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for insomnia. The aims of this study were threefold: (a) to determine whether change in dysfunctional beliefs about sleep was related to change in sleep, insomnia symptoms, and impairment following treatment; (b) to determine whether BT, CT, and CBT differ in their effects on dysfunctional beliefs; and (c) to determine whether the treatments differ in their effects on particular kinds of dysfunctional beliefs. Beliefs, sleep, insomnia symptoms, and sleep-related psychosocial impairment were assessed at pretreatment, posttreatment, and 6- and 12-month follow-up. Greater change in dysfunctional beliefs occurring over the course of BT, CT, or CBT was associated with greater improvement in insomnia symptoms and impairment at posttreatment and both follow-ups. All groups experienced a significant decrease in dysfunctional beliefs during treatment, which were sustained through 6- and 12-month follow-up. Compared with the BT group, a greater proportion of participants in the CT and/or CBT groups endorsed dysfunctional beliefs below a level considered clinically significant at posttreatment and 12-month follow-up. The results demonstrate the importance of targeting dysfunctional beliefs in insomnia treatment, suggest that beliefs may be significantly modified with BT alone, and indicate that cognitive interventions may be particularly powerful in enhancing belief change.

3 Article Comparative efficacy of behavior therapy, cognitive therapy, and cognitive behavior therapy for chronic insomnia: a randomized controlled trial. 2014

Harvey, Allison G / Bélanger, Lynda / Talbot, Lisa / Eidelman, Polina / Beaulieu-Bonneau, Simon / Fortier-Brochu, Émilie / Ivers, Hans / Lamy, Manon / Hein, Kerrie / Soehner, Adriane M / Mérette, Chantal / Morin, Charles M. ·Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley. · Department of Psychology, Université Laval. · Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco. · Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Science Center. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. ·J Consult Clin Psychol · Pubmed #24865869.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To examine the unique contribution of behavior therapy (BT) and cognitive therapy (CT) relative to the full cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for persistent insomnia. METHOD: Participants were 188 adults (117 women; M age = 47.4 years, SD = 12.6) with persistent insomnia (average of 14.5 years duration). They were randomized to 8 weekly, individual sessions consisting of BT (n = 63), CT (n = 65), or CBT (n = 60). RESULTS: Full CBT was associated with greatest improvements, the improvements associated with BT were faster but not as sustained and the improvements associated with CT were slower and sustained. The proportion of treatment responders was significantly higher in the CBT (67.3%) and BT (67.4%) relative to CT (42.4%) groups at post treatment, while 6 months later CT made significant further gains (62.3%), BT had significant loss (44.4%), and CBT retained its initial response (67.6%). Remission rates followed a similar trajectory, with higher remission rates at post treatment in CBT (57.3%) relative to CT (30.8%), with BT falling in between (39.4%); CT made further gains from post treatment to follow up (30.9% to 51.6%). All 3 therapies produced improvements of daytime functioning at both post treatment and follow up, with few differential changes across groups. CONCLUSIONS: Full CBT is the treatment of choice. Both BT and CT are effective, with a more rapid effect for BT and a delayed action for CT. These different trajectories of changes provide unique insights into the process of behavior change via behavioral versus cognitive routes.

4 Article A test of the bidirectional association between sleep and mood in bipolar disorder and insomnia. 2012

Talbot, Lisa S / Stone, Susan / Gruber, June / Hairston, Ilana S / Eidelman, Polina / Harvey, Allison G. ·Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1650, USA. ·J Abnorm Psychol · Pubmed #21842957.

ABSTRACT: The present study investigates sleep, mood, and the proposed bidirectional relationship between the two in psychiatric disorders. Participants with interepisode bipolar disorder (n = 49), insomnia (n = 34), and no psychiatric history (n = 52) completed seven consecutive days of sleep diaries and mood measures. The interepisode bipolar and insomnia participants exhibited greater sleep disturbance than the healthy control individuals. Negative mood was equally heightened in both interepisode bipolar disorder and insomnia, and there were no differences between the three groups in positive mood. Total wake time was associated with next morning negative mood in bipolar disorder, whereas evening negative mood was associated with subsequent total wake time in both bipolar disorder and insomnia. Additionally, positive mood was associated with subsequent total wake time for the insomnia group. Results support the theory that disruptions in nighttime sleep and daytime mood may be mutually maintaining and suggest the potential importance of transdiagnostic or universal processes.

5 Article Sensory gating in primary insomnia. 2010

Hairston, Ilana S / Talbot, Lisa S / Eidelman, Polina / Gruber, June / Harvey, Allison G. ·Psychiatry Department, Addiction Research Center, University of Michigan, Rachel Upjohn Bldg, 4250 Plymouth Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 5740, USA. ilanahai@med.umich.edu ·Eur J Neurosci · Pubmed #20529120.

ABSTRACT: Although previous research indicates that sleep architecture is largely intact in primary insomnia (PI), the spectral content of the sleeping electroencephalographic trace and measures of brain metabolism suggest that individuals with PI are physiologically more aroused than good sleepers. Such observations imply that individuals with PI may not experience the full deactivation of sensory and cognitive processing, resulting in reduced filtering of external sensory information during sleep. To test this hypothesis, gating of sensory information during sleep was tested in participants with primary insomnia (n = 18) and good sleepers (n = 20). Sensory gating was operationally defined as (i) the difference in magnitude of evoked response potentials elicited by pairs of clicks presented during Wake and Stage II sleep, and (ii) the number of K complexes evoked by the same auditory stimulus. During wake the groups did not differ in magnitude of sensory gating. During sleep, sensory gating of the N350 component was attenuated and completely diminished in participants with insomnia. P450, which occurred only during sleep, was strongly gated in good sleepers, and less so in participants with insomnia. Additionally, participants with insomnia showed no stimulus-related increase in K complexes. Thus, PI is potentially associated with impaired capacity to filter out external sensory information, especially during sleep. The potential of using stimulus-evoked K complexes as a biomarker for primary insomnia is discussed.

6 Article The effect of mood on sleep onset latency and REM sleep in interepisode bipolar disorder. 2009

Talbot, Lisa S / Hairston, Ilana S / Eidelman, Polina / Gruber, June / Harvey, Allison G. ·Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1650, USA. ·J Abnorm Psychol · Pubmed #19685943.

ABSTRACT: The present study investigates whether interepisode mood regulation impairment contributes to disturbances in sleep onset latency (SOL) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Individuals with interepisode bipolar disorder (n = 28) and healthy controls (n = 28) slept in the laboratory for 2 baseline nights, a happy mood induction night, and a sad mood induction night. There was a significant interaction whereby on the happy mood induction night the bipolar group exhibited significantly longer SOL than did the control group, while there was no difference on the baseline nights. In addition, control participants exhibited shorter SOL on the happy mood induction night compared to the baseline nights, a finding that was not observed in the bipolar group. On the sad mood induction night, participants in both groups had shorter SOL and increased REM density when compared to the baseline nights. Bipolar participants exhibited heightened REM density compared to control participants on both nights. These results raise the possibility that regulation of positive stimuli may be a contributor to difficulties with SOL, while hyperactivity may be characteristic of REM sleep.

7 Article Transdiagnostic emotion regulation processes in bipolar disorder and insomnia. 2008

Gruber, June / Eidelman, Polina / Harvey, Allison G. ·Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, 2205 Tolman Hall #1650, Berkeley, CA 94720-1650, USA. ·Behav Res Ther · Pubmed #18684436.

ABSTRACT: Research and treatment have traditionally adopted a 'disorder-focused' approach by targeting one specific disorder, aiming to understanding its cause, maintenance and treatment. The aim of the present study was to contribute to the burgeoning interest in examining common, or 'transdiagnostic,' processes across disorders. Three candidate transdiagnostic processes involved in emotion regulation - rumination, worry, and automatic negative thoughts - were examined in euthymic bipolar I disorder (n=21) and insomnia (n=19), and a non-clinical control group (n=20). Rumination and worry were endorsed to a larger degree by the bipolar and insomnia groups compared to the control group. However, while the bipolar group had more negative automatic thoughts than the control group, there were no significant differences in negative automatic thoughts between the bipolar and insomnia groups or the insomnia and control groups. These results suggested that rumination and worry, but not negative automatic thoughts, might be common across bipolar disorder and insomnia. However, these findings no longer remained significant when current symptoms of anxiety and depression were controlled for. Prospective and experimental studies are needed to test the extent to which these processes contribute to the etiology or maintenance of insomnia and bipolar disorder.