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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders: HELP
Articles by Simon B. Eickhoff
Based on 3 articles published since 2009
(Why 3 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Simon B. Eickhoff wrote the following 3 articles about Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review A lack of consistent brain alterations in insomnia disorder: An activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis. 2018

Tahmasian, Masoud / Noori, Khadijeh / Samea, Fateme / Zarei, Mojtaba / Spiegelhalder, Kai / Eickhoff, Simon B / Van Someren, Eus / Khazaie, Habibolah / Eickhoff, Claudia R. ·Institute of Medical Science and Technology, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran. · Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. · Institute for Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran. · Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Centre - University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Germany. · Institute of Systems Neuroscience, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine University Düsseldorf, Germany; Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1; INM-7), Research Center Jülich, Jülich, Germany. · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Meibergdreef 47, 1105 Amsterdam BA, The Netherlands; Department of Psychiatry and Integrative Neurophysiology, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research (CNCR), Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, VU University and Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1187, 1081 Amsterdam HV, The Netherlands. · Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. Electronic address: hakhazaie@gmail.com. · Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1; INM-7), Research Center Jülich, Jülich, Germany; Institute of Clinical Neuroscience and Medical Psychology, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany. ·Sleep Med Rev · Pubmed #30093361.

ABSTRACT: Insomnia disorder is a prevalent sleep disorder, which affects about 10% of general population. However, its neural mechanisms are poorly understood. Recently, several structural and functional neuroimaging studies have been conducted in patients with insomnia disorder, but these studies have yielded diverse findings. Here, we aimed to identify consistent patterns of abnormal brain alterations in insomnia disorder by performing a quantitative coordinate-based meta-analysis. Following the preferred reporting for systematic reviews and meta-analyses statement, we searched PubMed database and used reference tracking and finally retrieved 19 eligible studies (six task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging, eight resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, three voxel-based morphometry, and two positron emission tomography). We extracted peak coordinates from these studies and tested for convergence using the activation likelihood estimation method. Using this method, we found no significant convergent evidence for combination of structural atrophy and functional disturbances across previous studies (p = 0.914). Inconsistencies across these studies might be related to heterogonous clinical populations, the explorative nature of these studies in combination with small sample sizes, different experimental designs, and various preprocessing and statistical approaches. Future neuroimaging studies on insomnia disorder should include larger well-characterized samples, as well as standard imaging and analysis protocols.

2 Review Functional reorganization in obstructive sleep apnoea and insomnia: A systematic review of the resting-state fMRI. 2017

Khazaie, Habibolah / Veronese, Mattia / Noori, Khadijeh / Emamian, Farnoosh / Zarei, Mojtaba / Ashkan, Keyoumars / Leschziner, Guy D / Eickhoff, Claudia R / Eickhoff, Simon B / Morrell, Mary J / Osorio, Ricardo S / Spiegelhalder, Kai / Tahmasian, Masoud / Rosenzweig, Ivana. ·Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS), Kermanshah, Iran. · Sleep and Brain Plasticity Centre, Department of Neuroimaging, IoPPN, King's College, London, UK. · Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS), Kermanshah, Iran; Department of Psychiatry, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · Institute of Medical Sciences and Technology, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran; School of Cognitive Sciences, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Tehran, Iran. · Sleep and Brain Plasticity Centre, Department of Neuroimaging, IoPPN, King's College, London, UK; Department of Neurosurgery, King's College Hospital, London, UK. · Sleep and Brain Plasticity Centre, Department of Neuroimaging, IoPPN, King's College, London, UK; Sleep Disorders Centre, Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK. · Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1), Research Center Jülich, Jülich, Germany; Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany. · Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1), Research Center Jülich, Jülich, Germany; Institute of Clinical Neuroscience & Medical Psychology, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany. · Academic Unit of Sleep and Breathing, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, UK and NIHR Respiratory Disease Biomedical Research Unit at the Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust,Sydney Street, London, SW3 6NP, UK. · Center for Brain Health, NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY, United States. · Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychophysiology/Sleep Medicine, Center for Mental Disorders, University of Freiburg Medical Center, Freiburg, Germany. · Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS), Kermanshah, Iran; Institute of Medical Sciences and Technology, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran; School of Cognitive Sciences, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Tehran, Iran. Electronic address: masoudtahmasian@gmail.com. ·Neurosci Biobehav Rev · Pubmed #28344075.

ABSTRACT: Functional neuroimaging techniques have accelerated progress in the study of sleep disorders. Considering the striking prevalence of these disorders in the general population, however, as well as their strong bidirectional relationship with major neuropsychiatric disorders, including major depressive disorder, their numbers are still surprisingly low. This review examines the contribution of resting state functional MRI to current understanding of two major sleep disorders, insomnia disorder and obstructive sleep apnoea. An attempt is made to learn from parallels of previous resting state functional neuroimaging findings in major depressive disorder. Moreover, shared connectivity biomarkers are suggested for each of the sleep disorders. Taken together, despite some inconsistencies, the synthesis of findings to date highlights the importance of the salience network in hyperarousal and affective symptoms in insomnia. Conversely, dysfunctional connectivity of the posterior default mode network appears to underlie cognitive and depressive symptoms of obstructive sleep apnoea.

3 Minor Reply to Hua Liu, HaiCun Shi and PingLei Pan: Coordinate based meta-analyses in a medium sized literature: Considerations, limitations and road ahead. 2018

Tahmasian, Masoud / Zarei, Mojtaba / Noori, Khadijeh / Khazaie, Habibolah / Samea, Fateme / Spiegelhalder, Kai / Eickhoff, Simon B / Van Someren, Eus / Eickhoff, Claudia R. ·Institute of Medical Science and Technology, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran. · Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. · Sleep Disorders Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. Electronic address: hakhazaie@gmail.com. · Institute for Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran. · Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Centre - University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Germany. · Institute of Systems Neuroscience, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine University Düsseldorf, Germany; Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1; INM-7), Research Center Jülich, Jülich, Germany. · Department of Sleep and Cognition, Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Meibergdreef 47, 1105 Amsterdam, BA, the Netherlands; Departments of Psychiatry and Integrative Neurophysiology, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research (CNCR), Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam UMC, De Boelelaan 1187, 1081 Amsterdam, HV, the Netherlands. · Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1; INM-7), Research Center Jülich, Jülich, Germany; Institute of Clinical Neuroscience and Medical Psychology, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany. ·Sleep Med Rev · Pubmed #30244921.

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