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Sleep Apnea Syndromes HELP
Based on 16,549 articles published since 2008
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These are the 16549 published articles about Sleep Apnea Syndromes that originated from Worldwide during 2008-2018.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Clinical Use of a Home Sleep Apnea Test: An American Academy of Sleep Medicine Position Statement. 2017

Rosen, Ilene M / Kirsch, Douglas B / Chervin, Ronald D / Carden, Kelly A / Ramar, Kannan / Aurora, R Nisha / Kristo, David A / Malhotra, Raman K / Martin, Jennifer L / Olson, Eric J / Rosen, Carol L / Rowley, James A / Anonymous2341202. ·Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Carolinas Healthcare Medical Group Sleep Services, Charlotte, North Carolina. · University of Michigan Sleep Disorders Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Saint Thomas Medical Partners -Sleep Specialists, Nashville, Tennessee. · Division of Pulmonary/Sleep/Critical Care, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · SLUCare Sleep Disorders Center. · Department of Neurology, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri. · Veteran Affairs Greater Los Angeles Health System, North Hills, California and David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Pediatrics, Case Western Reserve University, University Hospitals - Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. · Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan. ·J Clin Sleep Med · Pubmed #28942762.

ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT: The diagnosis and effective treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in adults is an urgent health priority. It is the position of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) that only a physician can diagnose medical conditions such as OSA and primary snoring. Throughout this statement, the term "physician" refers to a medical provider who is licensed to practice medicine. A home sleep apnea test (HSAT) is an alternative to polysomnography for the diagnosis of OSA in uncomplicated adults presenting with signs and symptoms that indicate an increased risk of moderate to severe OSA. It is also the position of the AASM that: the need for, and appropriateness of, an HSAT must be based on the patient's medical history and a face-to-face examination by a physician, either in person or via telemedicine; an HSAT is a medical assessment that must be ordered by a physician to diagnose OSA or evaluate treatment efficacy; an HSAT should not be used for general screening of asymptomatic populations; diagnosis, assessment of treatment efficacy, and treatment decisions must not be based solely on automatically scored HSAT data, which could lead to sub-optimal care that jeopardizes patient health and safety; and the raw data from the HSAT device must be reviewed and interpreted by a physician who is either board-certified in sleep medicine or overseen by a board-certified sleep medicine physician.

2 Guideline American Academy of Sleep Medicine Position Paper for the Use of a Home Sleep Apnea Test for the Diagnosis of OSA in Children. 2017

Kirk, Valerie / Baughn, Julie / D'Andrea, Lynn / Friedman, Norman / Galion, Anjalee / Garetz, Susan / Hassan, Fauziya / Wrede, Joanna / Harrod, Christopher G / Malhotra, Raman K. ·University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. · Rocky Mountain Pediatric Sleep Disorders, Aurora, Colorado. · Children's Hospital of Orange County, Orange, California. · University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington. · American Academy of Sleep Medicine, Darien, Illinois. · Saint Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri. ·J Clin Sleep Med · Pubmed #28877820.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this position paper is to establish the American Academy of Sleep Medicine's (AASM) position on the use of a home sleep apnea test (HSAT) for the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children (birth to 18 years of age). METHODS: The AASM commissioned a task force of 8 experts in sleep medicine to review the available literature on the use of an HSAT to diagnose OSA in children. The task force developed the position statement based on a thorough review of these studies and their clinical expertise. The AASM Board of Directors approved the final position statement. POSITION STATEMENT: Use of a home sleep apnea test is not recommended for the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea in children. The ultimate judgment regarding propriety of any specific care must be made by the clinician, in light of the individual circumstances presented by the patient, available diagnostic tools, accessible treatment options, and resources.

3 Guideline Perioperative management of obstructive sleep apnea in bariatric surgery: a consensus guideline. 2017

de Raaff, Christel A L / Gorter-Stam, Marguerite A W / de Vries, Nico / Sinha, Ashish C / Jaap Bonjer, H / Chung, Frances / Coblijn, Usha K / Dahan, Albert / van den Helder, Rick S / Hilgevoord, Antonius A J / Hillman, David R / Margarson, Michael P / Mattar, Samer G / Mulier, Jan P / Ravesloot, Madeline J L / Reiber, Beata M M / van Rijswijk, Anne-Sophie / Singh, Preet Mohinder / Steenhuis, Roos / Tenhagen, Mark / Vanderveken, Olivier M / Verbraecken, Johan / White, David P / van der Wielen, Nicole / van Wagensveld, Bart A. ·Department of Surgery, OLVG West, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Electronic address: c.deraaff@olvg.nl. · Department of Surgery, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Oral Kinesiology, ACTA, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Translational Neurosciences Research Group, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium; Department of Otorhinolaryngology, OLVG West, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Department of Anesthesiology, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Anesthesiology, LUMC, Leiden, the Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Noordwest Ziekenhuisgroep, Alkmaar, the Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, OLVG West, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Pulmonary Physiology and Sleep Medicine, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Australia. · Department of Anaesthesia, Saint Richard's Hospital, Chichester, United Kingdom. · Department of Surgery, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA. · Department of Anesthesiology, AZ Sint Jan, Brugge, Belgium. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, OLVG West, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Rode Kruis Ziekenhuis, Beverwijk, the Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, MC Slotervaart, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Anesthesiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. · Medical Library, OLVG West, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Translational Neurosciences Research Group, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium. · Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Multidisciplinary Sleep Disorders Centre, Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Edegem, Belgium. · Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Surgery, OLVG West, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. ·Surg Obes Relat Dis · Pubmed #28666588.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The frequency of metabolic and bariatric surgery (MBS) is increasing worldwide, with over 500,000 cases performed every year. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is present in 35%-94% of MBS patients. Nevertheless, consensus regarding the perioperative management of OSA in MBS patients is not established. OBJECTIVES: To provide consensus based guidelines utilizing current literature and, when in the absence of supporting clinical data, expert opinion by organizing a consensus meeting of experts from relevant specialties. SETTING: The meeting was held in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. METHODS: A panel of 15 international experts identified 75 questions covering preoperative screening, treatment, postoperative monitoring, anesthetic care and follow-up. Six researchers reviewed the literature systematically. During this meeting, the "Amsterdam Delphi Method" was utilized including controlled acquisition of feedback, aggregation of responses and iteration. RESULTS: Recommendations or statements were provided for 58 questions. In the judgment of the experts, 17 questions provided no additional useful information and it was agreed to exclude them. With the exception of 3 recommendations (64%, 66%, and 66% respectively), consensus (>70%) was reached for 55 statements and recommendations. Several highlights: polysomnography is the gold standard for diagnosing OSA; continuous positive airway pressure is recommended for all patients with moderate and severe OSA; OSA patients should be continuously monitored with pulse oximetry in the early postoperative period; perioperative usage of sedatives and opioids should be minimized. CONCLUSION: This first international expert meeting provided 58 statements and recommendations for a clinical consensus guideline regarding the perioperative management of OSA patients undergoing MBS.

4 Guideline Management of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Commercial Motor Vehicle Operators: Recommendations of the AASM Sleep and Transportation Safety Awareness Task Force. 2017

Gurubhagavatula, Indira / Sullivan, Shannon / Meoli, Amy / Patil, Susheel / Olson, Ryan / Berneking, Michael / Watson, Nathaniel F. ·Division of Sleep Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Corporal Michael Crescenz VA Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Psychiatry, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California. · Penn State Sleep Research and Treatment Center, Hummelstown, Pennsylvania. · Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Oregon Institute of Occupational Health Sciences, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon. · Concentra, Inc., Grand Rapids, Michigan. · University of Washington Medicine Sleep Disorders Center and Department of Neurology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. ·J Clin Sleep Med · Pubmed #28356173.

ABSTRACT: ABSTRACT: The American Academy of Sleep Medicine Sleep and Transportation Safety Awareness Task Force responded to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration and Federal Railroad Administration Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking and request for public comments regarding the evaluation of safety-sensitive personnel for moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The following document represents this response. The most salient points provided in our comments are that (1) moderate-to-severe OSA is common among commercial motor vehicle operators (CMVOs) and contributes to an increased risk of crashes; (2) objective screening methods are available and preferred for identifying at-risk drivers, with the most commonly used indicator being body mass index; (3) treatment in the form of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is effective and reduces crashes; (4) CPAP is economically viable; (5) guidelines are available to assist medical examiners in determining whether CMVOs with moderate-to-severe OSA should continue to work without restrictions, with conditional certification, or be disqualified from operating commercial motor vehicles.

5 Guideline Clinical Practice Guideline for Diagnostic Testing for Adult Obstructive Sleep Apnea: An American Academy of Sleep Medicine Clinical Practice Guideline. 2017

Kapur, Vishesh K / Auckley, Dennis H / Chowdhuri, Susmita / Kuhlmann, David C / Mehra, Reena / Ramar, Kannan / Harrod, Christopher G. ·University of Washington, Seattle, WA. · MetroHealth Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH. · John D. Dingell VA Medical Center and Wayne State University, Detroit, MI. · Bothwell Regional Health Center, Sedalia, MO. · Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. · American Academy of Sleep Medicine, Darien, IL. ·J Clin Sleep Med · Pubmed #28162150.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: This guideline establishes clinical practice recommendations for the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in adults and is intended for use in conjunction with other American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) guidelines on the evaluation and treatment of sleep-disordered breathing in adults. METHODS: The AASM commissioned a task force of experts in sleep medicine. A systematic review was conducted to identify studies, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) process was used to assess the evidence. The task force developed recommendations and assigned strengths based on the quality of evidence, the balance of benefits and harms, patient values and preferences, and resource use. In addition, the task force adopted foundational recommendations from prior guidelines as "good practice statements", that establish the basis for appropriate and effective diagnosis of OSA. The AASM Board of Directors approved the final recommendations. RECOMMENDATIONS: The following recommendations are intended as a guide for clinicians diagnosing OSA in adults. Under GRADE, a STRONG recommendation is one that clinicians should follow under most circumstances. A WEAK recommendation reflects a lower degree of certainty regarding the outcome and appropriateness of the patient-care strategy for all patients. The ultimate judgment regarding propriety of any specific care must be made by the clinician in light of the individual circumstances presented by the patient, available diagnostic tools, accessible treatment options, and resources. Good Practice Statements: Diagnostic testing for OSA should be performed in conjunction with a comprehensive sleep evaluation and adequate follow-up. Polysomnography is the standard diagnostic test for the diagnosis of OSA in adult patients in whom there is a concern for OSA based on a comprehensive sleep evaluation.Recommendations: We recommend that clinical tools, questionnaires and prediction algorithms not be used to diagnose OSA in adults, in the absence of polysomnography or home sleep apnea testing. (STRONG). We recommend that polysomnography, or home sleep apnea testing with a technically adequate device, be used for the diagnosis of OSA in uncomplicated adult patients presenting with signs and symptoms that indicate an increased risk of moderate to severe OSA. (STRONG). We recommend that if a single home sleep apnea test is negative, inconclusive, or technically inadequate, polysomnography be performed for the diagnosis of OSA. (STRONG). We recommend that polysomnography, rather than home sleep apnea testing, be used for the diagnosis of OSA in patients with significant cardiorespiratory disease, potential respiratory muscle weakness due to neuromuscular condition, awake hypoventilation or suspicion of sleep related hypoventilation, chronic opioid medication use, history of stroke or severe insomnia. (STRONG). We suggest that, if clinically appropriate, a split-night diagnostic protocol, rather than a full-night diagnostic protocol for polysomnography be used for the diagnosis of OSA. (WEAK). We suggest that when the initial polysomnogram is negative and clinical suspicion for OSA remains, a second polysomnogram be considered for the diagnosis of OSA. (WEAK).

6 Guideline 7th Brazilian Guideline of Arterial Hypertension: Chapter 12 - Secondary Arterial Hypertension 2016

Malachias, M V B / Bortolotto, L A / Drager, L F / Borelli, F A O / Lotaif, L A D / Martins, L C. · ·Arq Bras Cardiol · Pubmed #27819391.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Guideline Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine Guidelines on Preoperative Screening and Assessment of Adult Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea. 2016

Chung, Frances / Memtsoudis, Stavros G / Ramachandran, Satya Krishna / Nagappa, Mahesh / Opperer, Mathias / Cozowicz, Crispiana / Patrawala, Sara / Lam, David / Kumar, Anjana / Joshi, Girish P / Fleetham, John / Ayas, Najib / Collop, Nancy / Doufas, Anthony G / Eikermann, Matthias / Englesakis, Marina / Gali, Bhargavi / Gay, Peter / Hernandez, Adrian V / Kaw, Roop / Kezirian, Eric J / Malhotra, Atul / Mokhlesi, Babak / Parthasarathy, Sairam / Stierer, Tracey / Wappler, Frank / Hillman, David R / Auckley, Dennis. ·From the *Department of Anesthesiology, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; †Department of Anesthesiology, Weill Cornell Medical College and Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York; ‡Department of Anesthesiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; §Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, University Hospital, St. Joseph's Hospital and Victoria Hospital, London Health Sciences Centre and St. Joseph's Health care, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada; ‖Paracelsus Medical University, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative Medicine and Intensive Care, Salzburg, Austria; ¶Department of Anesthesiology, Hospital for Special Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College New York, New York; #Department of Anesthesia, Perioperative Medicine and Intensive Care, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria; **Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California; ††Sparrow Hospital, Lansing, Michigan; ‡‡Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Texas; §§Department of Medicine, Division of Respiratory Medicine, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; ‖‖University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; ¶¶Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia; ##Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, California; ***Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts; †††Library and Information Services, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; ‡‡‡Department of Anesthesiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota; §§§Department of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota; ‖‖‖School of Medicine, Universidad Peruana de Ciencias Apl ·Anesth Analg · Pubmed #27442772.

ABSTRACT: The purpose of the Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine guideline on preoperative screening and assessment of adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is to present recommendations based on the available clinical evidence on the topic where possible. As very few well-performed randomized studies in this field of perioperative care are available, most of the recommendations were developed by experts in the field through consensus processes involving utilization of evidence grading to indicate the level of evidence upon which recommendations were based. This guideline may not be appropriate for all clinical situations and all patients. The decision whether to follow these recommendations must be made by a responsible physician on an individual basis. Protocols should be developed by individual institutions taking into account the patients' conditions, extent of interventions and available resources. This practice guideline is not intended to define standards of care or represent absolute requirements for patient care. The adherence to these guidelines cannot in any way guarantee successful outcomes and is rather meant to help individuals and institutions formulate plans to better deal with the challenges posed by perioperative patients with OSA. These recommendations reflect the current state of knowledge and its interpretation by a group of experts in the field at the time of publication. While these guidelines will be periodically updated, new information that becomes available between updates should be taken into account. Deviations in practice from guidelines may be justifiable and such deviations should not be interpreted as a basis for claims of negligence.

8 Guideline [Hungarian Society for Sleep Medicine guideline for detecting drivers with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome]. 2016

Szakács, Zoltán / Ádám, Ágnes / Annus, János Kristóf / Csatlós, Dalma / László, Andrea / Kalabay, László / Torzsa, Péter. ·Magyar Honvédség Egészségügyi Központ Budapest. · Családorvosi Tanszék, Semmelweis Egyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar Budapest, Kútvölgyi út 4., 1125. · SomnoCenter, Alvászavar Központ Szeged. ·Orv Hetil · Pubmed #27233832.

ABSTRACT: Obstructive sleep apnea is the most frequent sleep-disordered breathing. The prevalence of sleep apnea in the general population is 2-4% and the main characteristics of the disease are the intermittent cessation or substantial reduction of airflow during sleep, which is caused by complete, or near complete upper airway obstruction. Decreased airflow is followed by oxygen desaturation and intermittent arousals. Untreated patients are 4-6 times more likely to cause traffic accidents than their healthy counterparts. The aims of the obstructive sleep apnea screening are to prevent and reduce the incidence of serious car accidents, which are often caused by one of the most dangerous sleep disorders. Since April 1, 2015 a modification of the 13/1992 regulation has been in force in Hungary which orders screening of obstructive sleep apnea during medical checkup of drivers. The Hungarian Society for Sleep Medicine made a guideline according to the regulation which was adapted to national circumstances and family doctors, occupational health specialists can more easily screen obstructive sleep apnea in suspected patients. In sleep ambulances the disease can be diagnosed and effective treatment can be started. Patients receiving appropriate treatment and with appropriate compliance can get their driving licence under regular care and control.

9 Guideline ENT-specific therapy of obstructive sleep apnoea in adults : A revised version of the previously published German S2e guideline. 2016

Verse, T / Dreher, A / Heiser, C / Herzog, M / Maurer, J T / Pirsig, W / Rohde, K / Rothmeier, N / Sauter, A / Steffen, A / Wenzel, S / Stuck, B A. ·Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Asklepios Klinikum Harburg, Eißendorfer Pferdeweg 52, 21075, Hamburg, Germany. · Klinik für Hals-Nasen-Ohrenheilkunde, Kopf- und Halschirurgie der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Carl-Thiem-Klinikum, Thiemstr. 111, 03048, Cottbus, Germany. · Sleep Disorders Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Mannheim, 68135, Mannheim, Germany. · , Mozartstr. 22/1, 89075, Ulm, Germany. · HNO-Praxis an der Oper, Dammtorstr. 27, 20354, Hamburg, Germany. · HNO-Gemeinschaftspraxis, Ebertstr. 20, 45879, Gelsenkirchen, Germany. · HNO Praxis Moser, Gehrking und Partner, Ludwigstr. 7, 86150, Augsburg, Germany. · Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, Klinik für HNO-Heilkunde, Ratzeburger Alle 160, 23562, Lübeck, Germany. · Sleep Disorders Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Mannheim, 68135, Mannheim, Germany. boris.stuck@uk-essen.de. · Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45147, Essen, Germany. boris.stuck@uk-essen.de. ·Sleep Breath · Pubmed #27179662.

ABSTRACT: The German Society of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery recently has released the abbreviated version of its scientific guideline "ENT-specific therapy of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in adults", which has been updated in 2015 and can be found online at the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies (Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften, AWMF). A summary of the main recommendations is provided in this revised English version. All recommendations are based on a systematic literature research of articles published up until March 2014. Literature research followed the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Literature Research to create Guidelines published by the German Cochrane Centre. Studies were evaluated with respect to their scientific value according to the recommendations of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine, and grades of recommendation are provided regarding each intervention.

10 Guideline [Mandibular advancement device for obstructive sleep apnea treatment in adults. July 2014]. 2016

Bettega, G / Breton, P / Goudot, P / Saint-Pierre, F / Anonymous6080867. ·Service de chirurgie maxillo-faciale et chirurgie plastique, hôpital A.-Michallon, BP 217, 38043 Grenoble cedex 9, France. Electronic address: GBettega@chu-grenoble.fr. · Service de stomatologie, chirurgie maxillofaciale et chirurgie plastique de la face, centre hospitalier Lyon-Sud, 165, chemin du Grand-Revoyet, 69495 Pierre-Bénite, France. · Service de stomatologie et chirurgie maxillo-faciale, hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière (AP-HP), 47-83, boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75013 Paris, France. · 32, avenue du Pdt Wilson, 75116 Paris, France. ·Rev Mal Respir · Pubmed #27160831.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Guideline American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. 2016

Cohen, Ezra E W / LaMonte, Samuel J / Erb, Nicole L / Beckman, Kerry L / Sadeghi, Nader / Hutcheson, Katherine A / Stubblefield, Michael D / Abbott, Dennis M / Fisher, Penelope S / Stein, Kevin D / Lyman, Gary H / Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L. ·Medical Oncologist, Moores Cancer Center, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA. · Retired Head and Neck Surgeon, Former Associate Professor of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Louisiana State University Health and Science Center, New Orleans, LA. · Program Manager, National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Research Analyst-Survivorship, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Professor of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Cancer Surgery, and Director of Head and Neck Surgical Oncology, George Washington University, Washington, DC. · Associate Professor, Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Section of Speech Pathology and Audiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. · Medical Director for Cancer Rehabilitation, Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation, West Orange, NJ. · Chief Executive Officer, Dental Oncology Professionals, Garland, TX. · Clinical Instructor of Otolaryngology and Nurse, Miller School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Division of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Miami, Miami, FL. · Vice President, Behavioral Research, and Director, Behavioral Research Center, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Co-Director, Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and Professor of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. · Director, The George Washington University Cancer Institute, Washington, DC. ·CA Cancer J Clin · Pubmed #27002678.

ABSTRACT: Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline was developed to assist primary care clinicians and other health practitioners with the care of head and neck cancer survivors, including monitoring for recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, and care coordination. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015, and a multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, dentistry, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, clinical psychology, speech-language pathology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, the patient perspective, and nursing was assembled. While the guideline is based on a systematic review of the current literature, most evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong recommendation. Therefore, recommendations should be viewed as consensus-based management strategies for assisting patients with physical and psychosocial effects of head and neck cancer and its treatment. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:203-239. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

12 Guideline Consensus & Evidence-based INOSA Guidelines 2014 (First edition). 2015

Sharma, Surendra K / Katoch, Vishwa Mohan / Mohan, Alladi / Kadhiravan, T / Elavarasi, A / Ragesh, R / Nischal, Neeraj / Sethi, Prayas / Behera, D / Bhatia, Manvir / Ghoshal, A G / Gothi, Dipti / Joshi, Jyotsna / Kanwar, M S / Kharbanda, O P / Kumar, Suresh / Mohapatra, P R / Mallick, B N / Mehta, Ravindra / Prasad, Rajendra / Sharma, S C / Sikka, Kapil / Aggarwal, Sandeep / Shukla, Garima / Suri, J C / Vengamma, B / Grover, Ashoo / Vijayan, V K / Ramakrishnan, N / Gupta, Rasik / Anonymous760844. · ·Indian J Chest Dis Allied Sci · Pubmed #26410986.

ABSTRACT: Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) are subsets of sleep-disordered breathing. Awareness about OSA and its consequences amongst the general public as well as the majority of primary care physcians across India is poor. This necessiated the development of the INdian initiative on Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (INOSA) guidelines under the auspices of Department of Health Research, Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, Government of India. OSA is the occurrence of an average five or more episodes of obstructive respiratory events per hour of sleep with either sleep related symptoms or comorbidities or ≥ 15 such episodes without any sleep related symptoms or comorbidities. OSAS is defined as OSA associated with daytime symptoms, most often excessive sleepiness. Patients undergoing routine health check-up with snoring, daytime sleepiness, obesity, hypertension, motor vehicular accidents and high risk cases should undergo a comprehensive sleep evaluation. Medical examiners evaluating drivers, air pilots, railway drivers and heavy machinery workers should be educated about OSA and should comprehensively evaluate applicants for OSA. Those suspected to have OSA on comprehensive sleep evaluation should be referred for a sleep study. Supervised overnight polysomnography (PSG) is the "gold standard" for evaluation of OSA. Positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is the mainstay of treatment of OSA. Oral appliances are indicated for use in patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer oral appliances to PAP, or who do not respond to PAP or who fail treatment attempts with PAP or behavioural measures. Surgical treatment is recommended in patients who have failed or are intolerant to PAP therapy.

13 Guideline 2015 ESC Guidelines for the management of patients with ventricular arrhythmias and the prevention of sudden cardiac death: The Task Force for the Management of Patients with Ventricular Arrhythmias and the Prevention of Sudden Cardiac Death of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Endorsed by: Association for European Paediatric and Congenital Cardiology (AEPC). 2015

Priori, Silvia G / Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina / Mazzanti, Andrea / Blom, Nico / Borggrefe, Martin / Camm, John / Elliott, Perry Mark / Fitzsimons, Donna / Hatala, Robert / Hindricks, Gerhard / Kirchhof, Paulus / Kjeldsen, Keld / Kuck, Karl-Heinz / Hernandez-Madrid, Antonio / Nikolaou, Nikolaos / Norekvål, Tone M / Spaulding, Christian / Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J / Anonymous231078. · ·Eur Heart J · Pubmed #26320108.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Guideline Chronic Cough. 2015

Pacheco, Adalberto / de Diego, Alfredo / Domingo, Christian / Lamas, Adelaida / Gutierrez, Raimundo / Naberan, Karlos / Garrigues, Vicente / López Vime, Raquel. ·Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, España. Electronic address: apacheco.hrc@salud.madrid.org. · Servicio de Neumología, Hospital La Fe, Valencia, España. · Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Parc Taulí, Sabadell, Barcelona, España. · Servicio de Pediatría, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Otorrinolaringología, Hospital Rey Juan Carlos, Móstoles, Madrid, España. · Centro de Salud Belchite, Zaragoza, España. · Servicio de Gastroenterología, Hospital La Fe, Valencia, España. · Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Severo Ochoa, Madrid, España. ·Arch Bronconeumol · Pubmed #26165783.

ABSTRACT: Chronic cough (CC), or cough lasting more than 8 weeks, has attracted increased attention in recent years following advances that have changed opinions on the prevailing diagnostic and therapeutic triad in place since the 1970s. Suboptimal treatment results in two thirds of all cases, together with a new notion of CC as a peripheral and central hypersensitivity syndrome similar to chronic pain, have changed the approach to this common complaint in routine clinical practice. The peripheral receptors involved in CC are still a part of the diagnostic triad. However, both convergence of stimuli and central nervous system hypersensitivity are key factors in treatment success.

15 Guideline [Mandibular advancement device for obstructive sleep apnea treatment in adults. July 2014]. 2015

Bettega, G / Breton, P / Goudot, P / Saint-Pierre, F / Anonymous1340818 / Anonymous1350818 / Anonymous1360818 / Anonymous1370818 / Anonymous1380818 / Anonymous1390818 / Anonymous1400818 / Anonymous1410818 / Anonymous1420818. ·Service de chirurgie maxillo-faciale et chirurgie plastique, hôpital A.-Michallon, BP 217, 38043 Grenoble cedex 9, France. Electronic address: GBettega@chu-grenoble.fr. · Service de stomatologie, chirurgie maxillofaciale et chirurgie plastique de la face, centre hospitalier Lyon-Sud, 165, chemin du Grand-Revoyet, 69495 Pierre-Bénite, France. · Service de stomatologie et chirurgie maxillo-faciale, hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière (AP-HP), 47-83, boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75013 Paris, France. · 32, avenue du Pdt Wilson, 75116 Paris, France. ·Rev Stomatol Chir Maxillofac Chir Orale · Pubmed #25593082.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Guideline Implications of revised AASM rules on scoring apneic and hypopneic respiratory events in patients with heart failure with nocturnal Cheyne-Stokes respiration. 2015

Heinrich, Jessica / Spießhöfer, Jens / Bitter, Thomas / Horstkotte, Dieter / Oldenburg, Olaf. ·Department of Cardiology, Heart and Diabetes Centre North Rhine-Westphalia, Ruhr University Bochum, Bad Oeynhausen, Germany. ·Sleep Breath · Pubmed #24906544.

ABSTRACT: STUDY OBJECTIVES: This study investigated the implications of the revised scoring rules of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) in patients with heart failure (HF) with Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR). METHODS: Ninety-one patients (NYHA ≥II, LVEF ≤45 %; age 73.6 ± 11.3 years old; 81 male subjects) with documented CSR underwent 8 h of cardiorespiratory polygraphy recordings. Those were analyzed by a single scorer strictly applying the 2007 recommended, 2007 alternative, and the 2012 scoring rules. RESULTS: Compared with the AASM 2007 recommended rules, apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and hypopnea index (HI) increased significantly when the 2007 alternative and 2012 rules were applied (AHI 34.1 ± 13.5/h vs 37.6 ± 13.2/h vs 38.3 ± 13.2/h, respectively; HI 10.2 ± 9.4/h vs 13.7 ± 10.7/h vs 14.4 ± 11.0/h, respectively; all p < 0.001). Duration of CSR increased significantly with the alternate versus recommended 2007 rules (182.2 ± 117.0 vs 170.1 ± 115.0 min; p ≤ 0.001); there was a significant decrease in CSR duration for the 2012 versus 2007 alternative rules (182.2 ± 117.0 vs 166.7 ± 115.4 min; p ≤ 0.001). CONCLUSION: AHI was higher using the AASM 2012 scoring rules due to a less strict definition of hypopnea. Data on the prognostic effects of CSR in patients with HF and the benefits of treatment are mostly based on the AASM 2007 recommended rules, so differences between these and the newer version need to be taken into account.

17 Guideline Diagnosis and treatment of snoring in adults-S2k Guideline of the German Society of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. 2015

Stuck, Boris A / Dreher, Alfred / Heiser, Clemens / Herzog, Michael / Kühnel, Thomas / Maurer, Joachim T / Pistner, Hans / Sitter, Helmut / Steffen, Armin / Verse, Thomas. ·Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Mannheim, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, 68167, Mannheim, Germany, boris.stuck@umm.de. ·Sleep Breath · Pubmed #24729153.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: This guideline aims to promote high-quality care by medical specialists for subjects who snore and is designed for everyone involved in the diagnosis and treatment of snoring in an in- or outpatient setting. DISCUSSION: To date, a satisfactory definition of snoring is lacking. Snoring is caused by a vibration of soft tissue in the upper airway induced by respiration during sleep. It is triggered by relaxation of the upper airway dilator muscles that occurs during sleep. Multiple risk factors for snoring have been described and snoring is of multifactorial origin. The true incidence of snoring is not clear to date, as the incidence differs throughout literature. Snoring is more likely to appear in middle age, predominantly in males. Diagnostic measures should include a sleep medical history, preferably involving an interview with the bed partner, and may be completed with questionnaires. Clinical examination should include examination of the nose to evaluate the relevant structures for nasal breathing and may be completed with nasal endoscopy. Evaluation of the oropharynx, larynx, and hypopharynx should also be performed. Clinical assessment of the oral cavity should include the size of the tongue, the mucosa of the oral cavity, and the dental status. Furthermore, facial skeletal morphology should be evaluated. In select cases, technical diagnostic measures may be added. Further objective measures should be performed if the medical history and/or clinical examination suggest sleep-disordered breathing, if relevant comorbidities are present, and if the subject requests treatment for snoring. According to current knowledge, snoring is not associated with medical hazard, and generally, there is no medical indication for treatment. Weight reduction should be achieved in every overweight subject who snores. In snorers who snore only in the supine position, positional treatment can be considered. In suitable cases, snoring can be treated successfully with intraoral devices. Minimally invasive surgery of the soft palate can be considered as long as the individual anatomy appears suitable. Treatment selection should be based on individual anatomic findings. After a therapeutic intervention, follow-up visits should take place after an appropriate time frame to assess treatment success and to potentially indicate further intervention.

18 Guideline Diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea in adults: a clinical practice guideline from theAmerican College of Physicians. 2014

Qaseem, Amir / Dallas, Paul / Owens, Douglas K / Starkey, Melissa / Holty, Jon-Erik C / Shekelle, Paul / Anonymous4030802. · ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #25089864.

ABSTRACT: DESCRIPTION: The American College of Physicians (ACP) developed this guideline to present the evidence and provide clinical recommendations on the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea in adults. METHODS: This guideline is based on published literature on this topic that was identified by using MEDLINE (1966 through May 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Searches were limited to English-language publications. The clinical outcomes evaluated for this guideline included all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, nonfatal cardiovascular disease, stroke, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, postsurgical outcomes, and quality of life. Sensitivities, specificities, and likelihood ratios were also assessed as outcomes of diagnostic tests. This guideline grades the evidence and recommendations by using ACP's clinical practice guidelines grading system. RECOMMENDATION 1: ACP recommends a sleep study for patients with unexplained daytime sleepiness. (Grade: weak recommendation, low-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 2: ACP recommends polysomnography for diagnostic testing in patients suspected of obstructive sleep apnea. ACP recommends portable sleep monitors in patients without serious comorbidities as an alternative to polysomnography when polysomnography is not available for diagnostic testing. (Grade: weak recommendation, moderate-quality evidence).

19 Guideline Children's Hospital Association consensus statements for comorbidities of childhood obesity. 2014

Estrada, Elizabeth / Eneli, Ihuoma / Hampl, Sarah / Mietus-Snyder, Michele / Mirza, Nazrat / Rhodes, Erinn / Sweeney, Brooke / Tinajero-Deck, Lydia / Woolford, Susan J / Pont, Stephen J / Anonymous2790800. ·1 Division of Endocrinology, Connecticut Children's Medical Center, University of Connecticut , Hartford, CT. ·Child Obes · Pubmed #25019404.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Childhood obesity and overweight affect approximately 30% of US children. Many of these children have obesity-related comorbidities, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, fatty liver disease, diabetes, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), sleep apnea, psychosocial problems, and others. These children need routine screening and, in many cases, treatment for these conditions. However, because primary care pediatric providers (PCPs) often are underequipped to deal with these comorbidities, they frequently refer these patients to subspecialists. However, as a result of the US pediatric subspecialist shortage and considering that 12.5 million children are obese, access to care by subspecialists is limited. The aim of this article is to provide accessible, user-friendly clinical consensus statements to facilitate the screening, interpretation of results, and early treatment for some of the most common childhood obesity comorbidities. METHODS: Members of the Children's Hospital Association (formerly NACHRI) FOCUS on a Fitter Future II (FFFII), a collaboration of 25 US pediatric obesity centers, used a combination of the best available evidence and collective clinical experience to develop consensus statements for pediatric obesity-related comorbidities. FFFII also surveyed the participating pediatric obesity centers regarding their current practices. RESULTS: The work group developed consensus statements for use in the evaluation and treatment of lipids, liver enzymes, and blood pressure abnormalities and PCOS in the child with overweight and obesity. The results of the FFFII survey illustrated the variability in the approach for initial evaluation and treatment as well as pattern of referrals to subspecialists among programs. CONCLUSIONS: The consensus statements presented in this article can be a useful tool for PCPs in the management and overall care of children with overweight and obesity.

20 Guideline [Perioperative management of patients with obstructive sleep apnea : update on the practice guidelines of the American Society of Anesthesiologists Task Force]. 2014

Fahlenkamp, A / Rossaint, R / Coburn, M / Anonymous790795. ·Klinik für Anästhesiologie, Universitätsklinik der RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstr. 30, 52074, Aachen, Deutschland, anaesthesiologie@ukaachen.de. ·Anaesthesist · Pubmed #24851836.

ABSTRACT: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a widespread disease which is associated with many cardiovascular diseases and can have health-related consequences for affected patients if untreated. It is known that perioperative airway complications occur more often in OSA patients during general anesthesia. Some years ago the Task Force of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) published practice guidelines on the perioperative approach to OSA patients. These guidelines have now been revised and updated. This article gives a summary of the recommended approach for the perioperative treatment of patients with OSA given in the 2014 guidelines.

21 Guideline Obstructive sleep apnea and primary snoring: treatment. 2014

Zancanella, E / Haddad, F M / Oliveira, L A M P / Nakasato, A / Duarte, B B / Soares, C F P / Cahali, M B / Eckeli, A / Caramelli, B / Drager, L F / Ramos, B D / Nóbrega, M / Fagondes, S C / Andrada, N C / Anonymous4460794 / Anonymous4470794 / Anonymous4480794 / Anonymous4490794 / Anonymous4500794. · ·Braz J Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #24838761.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Guideline Obstructive sleep apnea and primary snoring: diagnosis. 2014

Zancanella, E / Haddad, F M / Oliveira, L A M P / Nakasato, A / Duarte, B B / Soares, C F P / Cahali, M B / Eckeli, A / Caramelli, B / Drager, L F / Ramos, B D / Nóbrega, M / Fagondes, S C / Andrada, N C / Anonymous4410794 / Anonymous4420794 / Anonymous4430794 / Anonymous4440794 / Anonymous4450794. · ·Braz J Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #24838760.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Guideline Practice guidelines for the perioperative management of patients with obstructive sleep apnea: an updated report by the American Society of Anesthesiologists Task Force on Perioperative Management of patients with obstructive sleep apnea. 2014

Anonymous2260779. · ·Anesthesiology · Pubmed #24346178.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Guideline Guidelines to decrease unanticipated hospital admission following adenotonsillectomy in the pediatric population. 2014

Raman, Vidya T / Jatana, Kris R / Elmaraghy, Charles A / Tobias, Joseph D. ·Departments of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children's Hospital and the Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States. Electronic address: Vidya.Raman@Nationwidechildrens.org. · Department of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, Nationwide Children's Hospital and the Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States. · Departments of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Nationwide Children's Hospital and the Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States. ·Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol · Pubmed #24239021.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Tonsillectomy has become one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures in the pediatric-aged patient. Many of these children are diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Although polysomnography is considered the gold standard, many practioners rely on the clinical examination and parental history. Nationwide Children's Hospital recently instituted pediatric adenotonsillectomy guidelines for hospital admission to help determine which patients should be done in main hospital OR vs. outpatient surgery facility. The main goal was to decrease unanticipated admissions. The secondary goal was to determine areas for practice improvement. METHODS: Using databases for the hospital, operating room, and otolaryngology, all cases with CPT codes 42820, 42830, 42825, 42826, and 42821 were evaluated from October 2009 to August 2012 in the main operating room and 2 outpatient surgery centers. Data for each unanticipated admission were reviewed to determine whether the criteria were met according to the developed guidelines. Fisher's exact test was applied to the unplanned admission rate before and after the institution of the guidelines. Non-paired t-test and a Fisher's exact test were used for comparison of the demographic data between the two groups. RESULTS: Following the institution of the pediatric adenotonsillectomy guidelines, the number of unanticipated admissions decreased from an absolute number of 88 to 43. This represents a decrease from 2.38% to 1.44% (p=0.008). Forty-two percent of the unanticipated admissions prior to establishing guidelines were in patients who would have met criteria for admission based on the guidelines. This decreased to 30% after establishing the guidelines. CONCLUSION: We found that the institution of pediatric adenotonsillectomy guidelines for patients undergoing adenotonsillectomy significantly decreased the rate of unanticipated admission. However, there was still a significant percentage (30%) of unanticipated admissions due to non-compliance with the guidelines demonstrating the need for ongoing practice improvement.

25 Guideline [Introduction to 2011 American clinical practice guideline: polysomnography for sleep disordered breathing prior to tonsillectomy in children]. 2013

Qiu, Shu-yao / Liu, Da-bo. ·Email: daboliu@126.com. ·Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi · Pubmed #24406195.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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