Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Eran van Veldhuisen
Based on 2 articles published since 2010
(Why 2 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, Eran van Veldhuisen wrote the following 2 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: Work-Up, Staging, and Local Intervention Strategies. 2019

van Veldhuisen, Eran / van den Oord, Claudia / Brada, Lilly J / Walma, Marieke S / Vogel, Jantien A / Wilmink, Johanna W / Del Chiaro, Marco / van Lienden, Krijn P / Meijerink, Martijn R / van Tienhoven, Geertjan / Hackert, Thilo / Wolfgang, Christopher L / van Santvoort, Hjalmar / Groot Koerkamp, Bas / Busch, Olivier R / Molenaar, I Quintus / van Eijck, Casper H / Besselink, Marc G / Anonymous4290998. ·Department of Surgery, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Regional Academic Cancer Center Utrecht, University of Utrecht, 3584 CX Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, University of Colorado, Denver, CO 80045, USA. · Department of Radiology, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, VU University, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Universitätsklinikum Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Surgery, John's Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. · Departments of Surgery, Regional Academic Cancer Center Utrecht, St Antonius Hospital Nieuwegein, 3435 CM Nieuwegein, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Erasmus University Medical Center, 3015 GD Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands. m.g.besselink@amsterdamumc.nl. ·Cancers (Basel) · Pubmed #31336859.

ABSTRACT: Locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) has several definitions but essentially is a nonmetastasized pancreatic cancer, in which upfront resection is considered not beneficial due to extensive vascular involvement and consequent high chance of a nonradical resection. The introduction of FOLFIRINOX chemotherapy and gemcitabine-nab-paclitaxel (gem-nab) has had major implications for the management and outcome of patients with LAPC. After 4-6 months induction chemotherapy, the majority of patients have stable disease or even tumor-regression. Of these, 12 to 35% are successfully downstaged to resectable disease. Several studies have reported a 30-35 months overall survival after resection; although it currently remains unclear if this is a result of the resection or the good response to chemotherapy. Following chemotherapy, selection of patients for resection is difficult, as contrast-enhanced computed-tomography (CT) scan is unreliable in differentiating between viable tumor and fibrosis. In case a resection is not considered possible but stable disease is observed, local ablative techniques are being studied, such as irreversible electroporation, radiofrequency ablation, and stereotactic body radiation therapy. Pragmatic, multicenter, randomized studies will ultimately have to confirm the exact role of both surgical exploration and ablation in these patients. Since evidence-based guidelines for the management of LAPC are lacking, this review proposes a standardized approach for the treatment of LAPC based on the best available evidence.

2 Article Added value of CA19-9 response in predicting resectability of locally advanced pancreatic cancer following induction chemotherapy. 2018

van Veldhuisen, Eran / Vogel, Jantien A / Klompmaker, Sjors / Busch, Olivier R / van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M / van Lienden, Krijn P / Wilmink, Johanna W / Marsman, Hendrik A / Besselink, Marc G. ·Department of Surgery, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1100DD, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1100DD, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Radiology, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1100DD, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1100DD, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: m.g.besselink@amc.nl. ·HPB (Oxford) · Pubmed #29475787.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Determining the resectability of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) after induction chemotherapy is complex since CT-imaging cannot accurately portray tumor response. We hypothesized that CA19-9 response adds to RECIST-staging in predicting resectability of LAPC. METHODS: Post-hoc analysis within a prospective study on LAPC (>90° arterial or >270° venous involvement). CA19-9 response was determined after induction chemotherapy. Surgical exploration was performed in RECIST-stable or -regressive disease. The relation between CA19-9 response, resectability and survival was assessed. RESULTS: Restaging in 54 patients with LAPC after induction chemotherapy (mostly FOLFIRINOX) identified 6 RECIST-regressive, 32 RECIST-stable, and 16 patients with RECIST-progressive disease. The resection rate was 20.3% (11/54 patients). Sensitivity and specificity of RECIST-regression for resection were 40% and 87% whereas the positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were 67% and 68%. Using a 30% decrease of CA19-9 as cut-off, 9/10 patients were correctly classified as resectable (90% sensitivity, PPV 43%) and 3/15 as unresectable (20% specificity, NPV 75%). In the total cohort, a CA19-9 decrease ≥30% was associated with improved survival (22.4 vs. 12.7 months, p = 0.02). CONCLUSION: Adding CA19-9 response after induction chemotherapy seems useful in determining which patients with RECIST non-progressive LAPC should undergo exploratory surgery.