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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Lennart B. van Rijssen
Based on 9 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, L. B. van Rijssen wrote the following 9 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Consensus statement on mandatory measurements in pancreatic cancer trials (COMM-PACT) for systemic treatment of unresectable disease. 2018

Ter Veer, Emil / van Rijssen, L Bengt / Besselink, Marc G / Mali, Rosa M A / Berlin, Jordan D / Boeck, Stefan / Bonnetain, Franck / Chau, Ian / Conroy, Thierry / Van Cutsem, Eric / Deplanque, Gael / Friess, Helmut / Glimelius, Bengt / Goldstein, David / Herrmann, Richard / Labianca, Roberto / Van Laethem, Jean-Luc / Macarulla, Teresa / van der Meer, Jonathan H M / Neoptolemos, John P / Okusaka, Takuji / O'Reilly, Eileen M / Pelzer, Uwe / Philip, Philip A / van der Poel, Marcel J / Reni, Michele / Scheithauer, Werner / Siveke, Jens T / Verslype, Chris / Busch, Olivier R / Wilmink, Johanna W / van Oijen, Martijn G H / van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. · Department of Internal Medicine III, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Methodology and Quality of Life in Oncology Unit, University Hospital of Besançon, Besançon, France. · Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London and Surrey, UK. · Department of Medical Oncology, Institut de Cancérologie de Lorraine and Lorraine University, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France. · Department of Gastroenterology and Digestive Oncology, University Hospitals Gasthuisberg Leuven and KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Oncology, Hôpital Riviera-Chablais, Vevey, Switzerland. · Department of Surgery, Technical University of Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich, Germany. · Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. · Nelune Cancer Centre, Prince of Wales Hospital, Prince of Wales Clinical School University of New South Wales, Randwick, NSW, Australia. · Department of Medical Oncology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland. · Cancer Center, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Gastrointestinal Cancer Unit, Erasme University Hospital, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. · Vall d'Hebron University Hospital (HUVH), Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO), Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Gastrointestinal Oncology Service, Division of Solid Tumor Oncology, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Hematology, Oncology and Tumor Immunology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin, Germany; Berlin Institute of Health, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Oncology, Karmanos Cancer Center, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of Internal Medicine I, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Division of Solid Tumor Translational Oncology, West German Cancer Cancer, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany; German Cancer Consortium (DKTK, partner site Essen) and German Cancer Research Center, DKFZ, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Digestive Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Electronic address: h.vanlaarhoven@amc.uva.nl. ·Lancet Oncol · Pubmed #29508762.

ABSTRACT: Variations in the reporting of potentially confounding variables in studies investigating systemic treatments for unresectable pancreatic cancer pose challenges in drawing accurate comparisons between findings. In this Review, we establish the first international consensus on mandatory baseline and prognostic characteristics in future trials for the treatment of unresectable pancreatic cancer. We did a systematic literature search to find phase 3 trials investigating first-line systemic treatment for locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer to identify baseline characteristics and prognostic variables. We created a structured overview showing the reporting frequencies of baseline characteristics and the prognostic relevance of identified variables. We used a modified Delphi panel of two rounds involving an international panel of 23 leading medical oncologists in the field of pancreatic cancer to develop a consensus on the various variables identified. In total, 39 randomised controlled trials that had data on 15 863 patients were included, of which 32 baseline characteristics and 26 prognostic characteristics were identified. After two consensus rounds, 23 baseline characteristics and 12 prognostic characteristics were designated as mandatory for future pancreatic cancer trials. The COnsensus statement on Mandatory Measurements in unresectable PAncreatic Cancer Trials (COMM-PACT) identifies a mandatory set of baseline and prognostic characteristics to allow adequate comparison of outcomes between pancreatic cancer studies.

2 Review Definition and classification of chyle leak after pancreatic operation: A consensus statement by the International Study Group on Pancreatic Surgery. 2017

Besselink, Marc G / van Rijssen, L Bengt / Bassi, Claudio / Dervenis, Christos / Montorsi, Marco / Adham, Mustapha / Asbun, Horacio J / Bockhorn, Maximillian / Strobel, Oliver / Büchler, Markus W / Busch, Olivier R / Charnley, Richard M / Conlon, Kevin C / Fernández-Cruz, Laureano / Fingerhut, Abe / Friess, Helmut / Izbicki, Jakob R / Lillemoe, Keith D / Neoptolemos, John P / Sarr, Michael G / Shrikhande, Shailesh V / Sitarz, Robert / Vollmer, Charles M / Yeo, Charles J / Hartwig, Werner / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Gouma, Dirk J / Anonymous2270883. ·Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: m.g.besselink@amc.nl. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, Pancreas Institute, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of First Surgery, Agia Olga Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery, Humanitas Research Hospital and University, Milan, Italy. · Department of HPB Surgery, Hopital Edouard Herriot, HCL, UCBL1, Lyon, France. · Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL. · Department of General-, Visceral-, and Thoracic-Surgery, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral, and Transplantation Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of HPB & Transplant Surgery, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Professorial Surgical Unit, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Surgery, Clinic Hospital of Barcelona, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · First Department of Digestive Surgery, Hippokrateon Hospital, University of Athens, Athens, Greece; Section for Surgical Research, Department of Surgery, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. · Department of Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and the Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Division of Subspecialty General Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. · Department of GI and HPB Surgical Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, India. · Department of Surgical Oncology, Medical University in Lublin, Poland. · Department of Surgery, Penn Medicine, The University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of Surgery, Jefferson Pancreas, Biliary and Related Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. · Division of Pancreatic Surgery, Department of General, Visceral, and Transplantation Surgery, Ludwig Maximilians University, University of Munich, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD. ·Surgery · Pubmed #27692778.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Recent literature suggests that chyle leak may complicate up to 10% of pancreatic resections. Treatment depends on its severity, which may include chylous ascites. No international consensus definition or grading system of chyle leak currently is available. METHODS: The International Study Group on Pancreatic Surgery, an international panel of pancreatic surgeons working in well-known, high-volume centers, reviewed the literature and worked together to establish a consensus on the definition and classification of chyle leak after pancreatic operation. RESULTS: Chyle leak was defined as output of milky-colored fluid from a drain, drain site, or wound on or after postoperative day 3, with a triglyceride content ≥110 mg/dL (≥1.2 mmol/L). Three different grades of severity were defined according to the management needed: grade A, no specific intervention other than oral dietary restrictions; grade B, prolongation of hospital stay, nasoenteral nutrition with dietary restriction, total parenteral nutrition, octreotide, maintenance of surgical drains, or placement of new percutaneous drains; and grade C, need for other more invasive in-hospital treatment, intensive care unit admission, or mortality. CONCLUSION: This classification and grading system for chyle leak after pancreatic resection allows for comparison of outcomes between series. As with the other the International Study Group on Pancreatic Surgery consensus statements, this classification should facilitate communication and evaluation of different approaches to the prevention and treatment of this complication.

3 Review Recent Advances in Pancreatic Cancer Surgery of Relevance to the Practicing Pathologist. 2016

van Rijssen, Lennart B / Rombouts, Steffi J E / Walma, Marieke S / Vogel, Jantien A / Tol, Johanna A / Molenaar, Isaac Q / van Eijck, Casper H J / Verheij, Joanne / van de Vijver, Marc J / Busch, Olivier R C / Besselink, Marc G H / Anonymous8590889. ·Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam 1105 AZ, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, University Medical Center, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht 3584 CX, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Erasmus Medical Center, Gravendijkwal 230, Rotterdam 3015 CE, The Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam 1105 AZ, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam 1105 AZ, The Netherlands. Electronic address: m.g.besselink@amc.uva.nl. ·Surg Pathol Clin · Pubmed #27926358.

ABSTRACT: Recent advances in pancreatic surgery have the potential to improve outcomes for patients with pancreatic cancer. We address 3 new, trending topics in pancreatic surgery that are of relevance to the pathologist. First, increasing awareness of the prognostic impact of intraoperatively detected extraregional and regional lymph node metastases and the international consensus definition on lymph node sampling and reporting. Second, neoadjuvant chemotherapy, which is capable of changing 10% to 20% of initially unresectable, to resectable disease. Third, in patients who remain unresectable following neoadjuvant chemotherapy, local ablative therapies may change indications for treatment and improve outcomes.

4 Review Systematic Review of Resection Rates and Clinical Outcomes After FOLFIRINOX-Based Treatment in Patients with Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer. 2016

Rombouts, Steffi J / Walma, Marieke S / Vogel, Jantien A / van Rijssen, Lennart B / Wilmink, Johanna W / Mohammad, Nadia Haj / van Santvoort, Hjalmar C / Molenaar, I Quintus / Besselink, Marc G. ·Department of Surgery, University Medical Centre Utrecht Cancer Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, G4-196, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Centre Utrecht Cancer Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, G4-196, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. m.g.besselink@amc.uva.nl. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #27370653.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: FOLFIRINOX prolongs survival in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer and may also benefit patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Furthermore, it may downstage a proportion of LAPC into (borderline) resectable disease, however data are lacking. This review assessed outcomes after FOLFIRINOX-based therapy in LAPC. METHODS: The PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane library databases were systematically searched for studies published to 31 August 2015. Primary outcome was the (R0) resection rate. RESULTS: Fourteen studies involving 365 patients with LAPC were included; three studies administered a modified FOLFIRINOX regimen. Of all patients, 57 % (n = 208) received radiotherapy. The pooled resection rate was 28 % (n = 103, 77 % R0), with a perioperative mortality of 3 % (n = 2), and median overall survival ranged from 8.9 to 25.0 months. Survival data after resection were scarce, with only one study reporting a median overall survival of 24.9 months in 28 patients. A complete pathologic response was found in 6 of 85 (7 %) resected specimens. Dose reductions were described in up to 65 % of patients, grade 3-4 toxicity occurred in 23 % (n = 51) of patients, and 2 % (n = 5) had to discontinue treatment. Data of patients treated solely with FOLFIRINOX, without additional radiotherapy, were available from 292 patients: resection rate was 12 % (n = 29, 70 % R0), with 15.7 months median overall survival and 19 % (n = 34) grade 3-4 toxicity. CONCLUSIONS: Outcomes after FOLFIRINOX-based therapy in patients with LAPC seem very promising but further prospective studies are needed, especially with regard to survival after resection.

5 Review Prognostic value of lymph node metastases detected during surgical exploration for pancreatic or periampullary cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2016

van Rijssen, Lennart B / Narwade, Poorvi / van Huijgevoort, Nadine C M / Tseng, Dorine S J / van Santvoort, Hjalmar C / Molenaar, Isaac Q / van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M / van Eijck, Casper H J / Busch, Olivier R C / Besselink, Marc G H / Anonymous11900872. ·Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Utrecht Medical Center, Utrecht, Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Department of Surgery, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, Netherlands. · Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Electronic address: m.g.besselink@amc.nl. ·HPB (Oxford) · Pubmed #27346135.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Hepatic-artery and para-aortic lymph node metastases (LNM) may be detected during surgical exploration for pancreatic (PDAC) or periampullary cancer. Some surgeons will continue the resection while others abort the exploration. METHODS: A systematic search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane Library for studies investigating survival in patients with intra-operatively detected hepatic-artery or para-aortic LNM. Survival was stratified for node positive (N1) disease. RESULTS: After screening 3088 studies, 13 studies with 2045 patients undergoing pancreatoduodenectomy were included. No study reported survival data after detection of LNM and aborted surgical exploration. In 110 patients with hepatic-artery LNM, median survival ranged between 7 and 17 months. Estimated pooled mean survival in 84 patients with hepatic-artery LNM was 15 [95%CI 12-18] months (13 months in PDAC), compared to 19 [16-22] months in 270 patients with N1-disease without hepatic-artery LNM (p = 0.020). In 192 patients with para-aortic LNM, median survival ranged between 5 and 32 months. Estimated pooled mean survival in 169 patients with para-aortic LNM was 13 [8-17] months (11 months in PDAC), compared to 17 (6-27) months in 506 patients with N1-disease without para-aortic LNM (p < 0.001). Data on the impact of (neo)adjuvant therapy on survival were lacking. CONCLUSION: Survival after pancreatoduodenectomy in patients with intra-operatively detected hepatic-artery and especially para-aortic LNM is inferior to patients undergoing pancreatoduodenectomy with other N1 disease. It remains unclear what the consequence of this should be since data on (neo-)adjuvant therapy and survival after aborted exploration are lacking.

6 Article Pathological Margin Clearance and Survival After Pancreaticoduodenectomy in a US and European Pancreatic Center. 2018

van Roessel, Stijn / Kasumova, Gyulnara G / Tabatabaie, Omidreza / Ng, Sing Chau / van Rijssen, L Bengt / Verheij, Joanne / Najarian, Robert M / van Gulik, Thomas M / Besselink, Marc G / Busch, Olivier R / Tseng, Jennifer F. ·Surgical Outcomes Analysis & Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Surgery, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Pathology, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Surgical Outcomes Analysis & Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Jennifer.Tseng@bmc.org. · Department of Surgery, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA. Jennifer.Tseng@bmc.org. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #29651577.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The optimal definition of a margin-negative resection and its exact prognostic significance on survival in resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains unknown. This study was designed to assess the relationship between pathological margin clearance, margin type, and survival. METHODS: Patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy with curative intent at two academic institutions, in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and Boston, Massachusetts, between 2000 and 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. Overall survival, recurrence rates, and progression-free survival (PFS) were assessed by Kaplan-Meier estimates and multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis, according to pathological margin clearance and type of margin involved. RESULTS: Of 531 patients identified, the median PFS was 12.9, 15.4, and 24.1 months, and the median overall survival was 17.4, 22.9, and 27.7 months for margin clearances of 0, < 1, and ≥1 mm, respectively (all log-rank p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, patients with a margin clearance of ≥1 mm demonstrated a survival advantage relative to those with 0 mm clearance [hazard ratio (HR) 0.71, p < 0.01], whereas survival was comparable for patients with a margin clearance of < 1 mm versus 0 mm (HR: 0.93, p = 0.60). Patients with involvement (0 or < 1 mm margin clearance) of the SMV/PV margin demonstrated prolonged median overall survival (25.7 months) relative to those with SMA involvement (17.5 months). CONCLUSIONS: In patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, a margin clearance of ≥1 mm correlates with improved survival relative to < 1 mm clearance and may be a more accurate predictor of a complete margin-negative resection in pancreatic cancer. The type of margin involved also appears to impact survival.

7 Article The Dutch Pancreas Biobank Within the Parelsnoer Institute: A Nationwide Biobank of Pancreatic and Periampullary Diseases. 2018

Strijker, Marin / Gerritsen, Arja / van Hilst, Jony / Bijlsma, Maarten F / Bonsing, Bert A / Brosens, Lodewijk A / Bruno, Marco J / van Dam, Ronald M / Dijk, Frederike / van Eijck, Casper H / Farina Sarasqueta, Arantza / Fockens, Paul / Gerhards, Michael F / Groot Koerkamp, Bas / van der Harst, Erwin / de Hingh, Ignace H / van Hooft, Jeanin E / Huysentruyt, Clément J / Kazemier, Geert / Klaase, Joost M / van Laarhoven, Cornelis J / van Laarhoven, Hanneke W / Liem, Mike S / de Meijer, Vincent E / van Rijssen, L Bengt / van Santvoort, Hjalmar C / Suker, Mustafa / Verhagen, Judith H / Verheij, Joanne / Verspaget, Hein W / Wennink, Roos A / Wilmink, Johanna W / Molenaar, I Quintus / Boermeester, Marja A / Busch, Olivier R / Besselink, Marc G / Anonymous5040939. · ·Pancreas · Pubmed #29521943.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Large biobanks with uniform collection of biomaterials and associated clinical data are essential for translational research. The Netherlands has traditionally been well organized in multicenter clinical research on pancreatic diseases, including the nationwide multidisciplinary Dutch Pancreatic Cancer Group and Dutch Pancreatitis Study Group. To enable high-quality translational research on pancreatic and periampullary diseases, these groups established the Dutch Pancreas Biobank. METHODS: The Dutch Pancreas Biobank is part of the Parelsnoer Institute and involves all 8 Dutch university medical centers and 5 nonacademic hospitals. Adult patients undergoing pancreatic surgery (all indications) are eligible for inclusion. Preoperative blood samples, tumor tissue from resected specimens, pancreatic cyst fluid, and follow-up blood samples are collected. Clinical parameters are collected in conjunction with the mandatory Dutch Pancreatic Cancer Audit. RESULTS: Between January 2015 and May 2017, 488 patients were included in the first 5 participating centers: 4 university medical centers and 1 nonacademic hospital. Over 2500 samples were collected: 1308 preoperative blood samples, 864 tissue samples, and 366 follow-up blood samples. CONCLUSIONS: Prospective collection of biomaterials and associated clinical data has started in the Dutch Pancreas Biobank. Subsequent translational research will aim to improve treatment decisions based on disease characteristics.

8 Article Volume-outcome relationships in pancreatoduodenectomy for cancer. 2016

van der Geest, Lydia G M / van Rijssen, L Bengt / Molenaar, I Quintus / de Hingh, Ignace H / Groot Koerkamp, Bas / Busch, Olivier R C / Lemmens, Valery E P P / Besselink, Marc G H / Anonymous12700863. ·Department of Research, Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organization (IKNL), Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: L.vanderGeest@iknl.nl. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Utrecht Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Research, Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organization (IKNL), Utrecht, The Netherlands. ·HPB (Oxford) · Pubmed #27037200.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Volume-outcome relationships in pancreatic surgery are well established, but an optimal volume remains to be determined. Studies analyzing outcomes in volume categories exceeding 20 procedures annually are lacking. STUDY DESIGN: A consecutive 3420 patients underwent PD for primary pancreatic or periampullary carcinoma (2005-2013) and were registered in the Netherlands Cancer Registry. Relationships between hospital volume (< 5, 5-19, 20-39 and ≥ 40 PDs/year) and mortality and survival were explored. RESULTS: There was a non-significant decrease in 90-day mortality from 8.1 to 6.7% during the study period (p = 0.23). Ninety-day mortality was 9.7% in centers performing < 5 PDs/year (n = 185 patients), 8.9% for 5-19 PDs/year (n = 1432), 7.3% for 20-39 PDs/year (n = 240) and 4.3% for ≥ 40 PDs/year (n = 562, p = 0.004). Within volume categories, 90-day mortality did not change over time. After adjustment for confounding factors, significantly lower mortality was found in the ≥ 40 category compared to 20-39 PDs/year (OR = 1.72 (1.08-2.74)). Overall survival adjusted for confounding factors was better in the ≥ 40 category compared to categories under 20 PDs/year: HR (≥ 40 vs 5-19/year) = 1.24 (1.09-1.42). In the ≥ 40 category significantly more patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and had > 10 lymph nodes retrieved compared to lower volume categories. CONCLUSIONS: Volume-outcome relationships in pancreatic surgery persist in centers performing ≥ 40 PDs annually, regarding both mortality and survival. The volume plateau for pancreatic surgery has yet to be determined.

9 Article National compliance to an evidence-based multidisciplinary guideline on pancreatic and periampullary carcinoma. 2016

van Rijssen, Lennart B / van der Geest, Lydia G M / Bollen, Thomas L / Bruno, Marco J / van der Gaast, Ate / Veerbeek, Laetitia / Ten Kate, Fibo J W / Busch, Olivier R C. ·Dutch Pancreatic Cancer Group (DPCG), The Netherlands; Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Dutch Pancreatic Cancer Group (DPCG), The Netherlands; Department of Research, Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organisation (IKNL), Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Dutch Pancreatic Cancer Group (DPCG), The Netherlands; Department of Radiology, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein/Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Dutch Pancreatic Cancer Group (DPCG), The Netherlands; Department of Gastroenterology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Medical Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Research, Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organisation (IKNL), Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Dutch Pancreatic Cancer Group (DPCG), The Netherlands; Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: o.r.busch@amc.nl. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #26560441.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: We evaluated national compliance to selected quality indicators from the Dutch multidisciplinary evidence-based guideline on pancreatic and periampullary carcinoma and identified areas for improvement. METHODS: Compliance to 3 selected quality indicators from the guideline was evaluated before and after implementation of the guideline in 2011: 1) adjuvant chemotherapy after tumor resection for pancreatic carcinoma, 2) discussion of the patient within a multidisciplinary team (MDT) meeting and 3) a maximum 3-week interval between final MDT meeting and start of treatment. RESULTS: In total 5086 patients with pancreatic or periampullary carcinoma were included. In 2010, 2522 patients were included and in 2012, 2564 patients. 1) Use of adjuvant chemotherapy following resection for pancreatic carcinoma increased significantly from 45% (120 out of 268) in 2010 to 54% (182 out of 336) in 2012 which was mainly caused by an increase in patients aged <75 years. 2) In 2012, 64% (896 of 1396) of patients suspected of a pancreatic or periampullary carcinoma was discussed within a MDT meeting which was higher in patients aged <75 years and patients starting treatment with curative intent. 3) In 2012, the recommended 3 weeks between final MDT meeting and start of treatment was met in 39% (141 of 363) of patients which was not influenced by patient and tumor characteristics. CONCLUSION: Compliance to three selected quality indicators in pancreatic cancer care was low in 2012. Areas for improvement were identified. Future compliance will be investigated through structured audit and feedback from the Dutch Pancreatic Cancer Audit.