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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Filippo De Braud
Based on 14 articles published since 2009
(Why 14 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, F. De Braud wrote the following 14 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Entering the third decade of experience with octreotide LAR in neuroendocrine tumors: A review of current knowledge. 2019

Pusceddu, Sara / Prinzi, Natalie / Raimondi, Alessandra / Corti, Francesca / Buzzoni, Roberto / Di Bartolomeo, Maria / Seregni, Ettore / Maccauro, Marco / Coppa, Jorgelina / Milione, Massimo / Mazzaferro, Vincenzo / de Braud, Filippo. ·1 Department of Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy. · 2 Department of Nuclear Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy. · 3 Department of Surgery and Liver Transplantation, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy. · 4 Department of Pathology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy. · 5 University of Milan, Milan, Italy. ·Tumori · Pubmed #29714658.

ABSTRACT: Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are a relatively rare group of heterogeneous neoplasms. The most significant advance in therapy of NETs has been the advent of the somatostatin analog octreotide, which represents a cornerstone in their management and dramatically changed the therapeutic landscape. Octreotide long-acting release (LAR) was developed to overcome some of the limitations of octreotide. Several clinical studies, including PROMID and RADIANT-2, have validated the clinical benefits of octreotide LAR in NETs, with tumor shrinkage in about 10% of patients and tumor stabilization in roughly half of cases. While the use of octreotide LAR is well-consolidated in NETs, some open questions remain. These include the use of high-dose octreotide LAR, as there is evidence that higher dose may provide longer disease control, and nonstandard treatment schedules, with administration every 21 days instead of 28 days, as well as their use in combination with targeted agents or peptide receptor radiotherapy in clinical practice. After 3 decades of clinical experience with octreotide LAR, the drug has a well-established safety profile. It is well-tolerated and treatment discontinuations due to adverse events are uncommon. One exception is cholelithiasis, which may increase with longer duration of treatment. According to the literature data, octreotide LAR is currently recommended in both functioning and nonfunctioning advanced NETs. This review summarizes the available clinical data with octreotide LAR and also provides future perspectives on its possible uses in patients with NETs.

2 Review Metformin with everolimus and octreotide in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor patients with diabetes. 2016

Pusceddu, Sara / Buzzoni, Roberto / Vernieri, Claudio / Concas, Laura / Marceglia, Sara / Giacomelli, Luca / Milione, Massimo / Leuzzi, Livia / Femia, Daniela / Formisano, Barbara / Mazzaferro, Vincenzo / de Braud, Filippo. ·Medical Oncology Unit 1, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Day Hospital/Outpatient Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · IFOM, FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology, 20139 Milan, Italy. · Department of Information & Bioengineering, Politecnico University, Milan, Italy. · Department of Surgical Sciences & Integrated Diagnostics, School of Medicine, Genova University, Genoa, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Gastro-Intestinal Surgery, Liver Transplantation & Hepatology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, Italy. ·Future Oncol · Pubmed #26890290.

ABSTRACT: A bidirectional relationship seems to exist between diabetes mellitus and development of pancreatic tumors. Metformin, the most widely used drug in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, has recently emerged as a potentially active agent in cancer chemoprevention and treatment. In this article, we discuss the potential correlation between glycemic status, administration of antiglycemic treatments, such as metformin or insulin, and prognosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors patients treated with everolimus and octreotide, on the basis of existing evidence and our experience.

3 Review Evolution in the treatment of gastroenteropancreatic-neuroendocrine neoplasms, focus on systemic therapeutic options: a systematic review. 2015

Pusceddu, Sara / De Braud, Filippo / Festinese, Fabrizio / Bregant, Cristina / Lorenzoni, Alice / Maccauro, Marco / Milione, Massimo / Concas, Laura / Formisano, Barbara / Leuzzi, Livia / Mazzaferro, Vincenzo / Buzzoni, Roberto. ·Department of Medical Oncology, ENETS Center of Excellence, Fondazione IRCCS 'Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori', Milan, Italy. · Department of Pharmacy, ENETS Center of Excellence, Fondazione IRCCS 'Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori', Milan, Italy. · Department of Nuclear Medicine, ENETS Center of Excellence, Fondazione IRCCS 'Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori', Milan, Italy. · Department of Pathology, ENETS Center of Excellence, Fondazione IRCCS 'Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori', Milan, Italy. · Department of Surgery & liver transplantation, ENETS Center of Excellence, Fondazione IRCCS 'Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori', Milan, Italy. ·Future Oncol · Pubmed #26161929.

ABSTRACT: Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) are a group of heterogeneous tumors. The present review discusses current therapeutic strategies for the treatment of gastro-entero-pancreatic NEN. Several systemic options are currently available, including medical systemic chemotherapy, biological drugs, somatostatin analogs and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy. The carcinoid syndrome can be adequately controlled with somatostatin analogs; chemotherapy has shown positive outcomes in poor prognosis patients, and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy is a promising treatment based on the use of radioisotopes for advanced disease expressing somatostatin receptors. Targeted therapies, such as multikinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies are also recommended or under evaluation for the treatment of advanced NENs, but some critical issues in clinical practice remain unresolved. Depending upon the development of the disease, a multimodal approach is recommended. The treatment strategy for metastatic patients should be planned by a multidisciplinary team in order to define the optimal sequence of treatments.

4 Review Biological targeted therapies in patients with advanced enteropancreatic neuroendocrine carcinomas. 2010

Fazio, Nicola / Cinieri, Saverio / Lorizzo, Katia / Squadroni, Michela / Orlando, Laura / Spada, Francesca / Maiello, Evaristo / Bodei, Lisa / Paganelli, Giovanni / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / de Braud, Filippo. ·European Institute of Oncology, IEO NET Study Group, Via Ripamonti 435, Milan, Italy. nicola.fazio@ieo.it ·Cancer Treat Rev · Pubmed #21129617.

ABSTRACT: Enteropancreatic (EP) neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) represent relatively rare and heterogeneous malignancies. They are the most common group among neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). In most cases they are advanced at diagnosis and slow-growing, therefore conditioning a better prognosis compared with non neuroendocrine carcinomas from the same sites. No standard medical therapy exists, except for somatostatin analogs in functioning tumors, and octreotide LAR in functioning or non functioning well differentiated NECs from small bowel. Several systemic therapeutic options exist, including chemotherapy, somatostatin analog, interferon, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), and molecular targeted drugs. Among them some therapies have specific biological tumor targets and can be defined as "biological targeted therapies". This review focuses on the status of EP NECs targeted therapies in the light of recent advances. Somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) are the first therapeutic target detected in EP NECs. Through them SS analogs and PRRT act, producing symptomatic, biochemical, and, to a lesser extent, antiproliferative effects. New SS analogs, covering a higher number of SSTR subtypes, were developed, including pasireotide (SOM230), which controls 25% of carcinoid syndromes resistant to full dose octreotide LAR. Chimeric analogs, which bind SSTR2/SSTR5 and dopamine-2 receptor subtype (D2), are in preclinical phase of development. Among the numerous molecular targeted agents investigated in NETs, mTOR inhibitors and VEGF/VEGFR/PDGFR inhibitors are in most advanced clinical phase of investigation. In particular, everolimus, sunitinib, and bevacizumab are all studied in phase III trials. Both everolimus and sunitinib produced significant survival benefit versus placebo in advanced progressing well-differentiated pancreatic NECs. Sunitinib data have been presented at the last ASCO in June 2010, and everolimus data will be presented at next ESMO in September 2010.

5 Review Molecular target therapy for gastroenteropancreatic endocrine tumours: biological rationale and clinical perspectives. 2009

Capurso, Gabriele / Fazio, Nicola / Festa, Stefano / Panzuto, Francesco / De Braud, Filippo / Delle Fave, Gianfranco. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, II Medical School, University "La Sapienza", Via Di Grottarossa 1035-1039, 00189, Rome, Italy. ·Crit Rev Oncol Hematol · Pubmed #19249226.

ABSTRACT: Gastroenteropancreatic endocrine tumours (GEP ETs) represent a relatively rare and heterogeneous group of neoplasms whose therapy can be challenging. The poorly differentiated, fast-growing cases are treated with chemotherapy. In the slow-growing ones, biotherapy is usually performed. Several categories of targeted therapies have been studied for their treatment in vitro and in vivo. A critical review of molecular alterations suggests a rationale for targeting angiogenesis, and the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI(3)K)/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Accordingly, antiangiogenic agents and mTOR inhibitors are presently the most tested agents in phase II and III studies. Bevacizumab, some multitarget inhibitors, and mTOR inhibitors showed promising results in patients with advanced GEP ETs. A limited activity has been reported for imatinib and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors. Combinations of molecular targeted therapies with different sites of action, and somatostatin analogues may be relevant to avoid molecular escape pathways. Future trials should include more homogeneous groups of patients and pay more attention to the subgroup with progressive disease.

6 Clinical Trial Rationale and protocol of the MetNET-1 trial, a prospective, single center, phase II study to evaluate the activity and safety of everolimus in combination with octreotide LAR and metformin in patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2014

Pusceddu, Sara / de Braud, Filippo / Concas, Laura / Bregant, Cristina / Leuzzi, Livia / Formisano, Barbara / Buzzoni, Roberto. · ·Tumori · Pubmed #25688512.

ABSTRACT: Abnormal PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway signalling and autocrine activation of the mTOR pathway, mediated through insulin-like growth factor-1, have been implicated in the proliferation of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET) cells. Everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, has shown antitumor benefit in pNETs alone and in combination with octreotide LAR in RADIANT-1 and RADIANT-3 studies. Although everolimus-based phase II/III trials have improved progression-free survival for pNET, its use has not impacted on prolonging overall survival. Metformin has recently shown some anti-cancer activity in both in vitro and in vivo studies by its indirect properties to decrease insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels and by its antitumour effect to promote AMPK activation and consequently inhibition to TSC1-2/mTOR complex. In light of even more retrospective evidence of metformin's anticancer activity, a prospective evaluation is required to either confirm or discard these preliminary findings. With the aim to evaluate the antiproliferative effect of metformin in combination with everolimus and octreotide LAR in pancreatic well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor patients, a single arm, prospective, single center phase II study was designed (MetNET-1 trial, NCT 02294006). Forty-three patients are expected to be evaluated. The study is ongoing, and recruitment is estimated to be completed in August 2016. The results will be anticipated in 2017.

7 Clinical Trial Real-world study of everolimus in advanced progressive neuroendocrine tumors. 2014

Panzuto, Francesco / Rinzivillo, Maria / Fazio, Nicola / de Braud, Filippo / Luppi, Gabriele / Zatelli, Maria Chiara / Lugli, Francesca / Tomassetti, Paola / Riccardi, Ferdinando / Nuzzo, Carmen / Brizzi, Maria Pia / Faggiano, Antongiulio / Zaniboni, Alberto / Nobili, Elisabetta / Pastorelli, Davide / Cascinu, Stefano / Merlano, Marco / Chiara, Silvana / Antonuzzo, Lorenzo / Funaioli, Chiara / Spada, Francesca / Pusceddu, Sara / Fontana, Annalisa / Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria / Cassano, Alessandra / Campana, Davide / Cartenì, Giacomo / Appetecchia, Marialuisa / Berruti, Alfredo / Colao, Annamaria / Falconi, Massimo / Delle Fave, Gianfranco. ·Digestive and Liver Disease, Sapienza University of Rome, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Rome, Italy; Unit of Gastrointestinal and Neuroendocrine Tumors, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy; Department of Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, Italy; Oncology and Hematology, Policlinico di Modena, Italy; Section of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy; Departments of Endocrinology and Oncologia Medica, Università Cattolica del S. Cuore, Rome, Italy; Departments of Medical and Surgical Sciences and Medical Oncology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy; Oncology, Antonio Cardarelli Hospital, Naples, Italy; Division of Medical Oncology and Endocrinology Unit, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute Rome, IRCCS, Rome, Italy; Oncology, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, Orbassano, Torino, Italy; Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University of Naples, Naples, Italy; Oncology, Fondazione Poliambulanza, Brescia, Italy; Oncology, Istituto Oncologico Veneto, Padova, Italy; Departments of Medical Oncology and Pancreatic Surgery, AOU Ospedali Riuniti, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Oncology, S. Croce e Carle Hospital, Cuneo, Italy; Department of Medical Oncology A, IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Genova, Italy; Oncologia Medica 1, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Florence, Italy; Oncology, Niguarda Cancer Center, Ospedale Niguarda Ca' Granda, Milan, Italy; Oncologia, Spedali Civili di Brescia, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease, Sapienza University of Rome, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Rome, Italy; Unit of Gastrointestinal and Neuroendocrine Tumors, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy; Department of Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, Italy; Oncology and Hematology, Policlinico di Modena, Italy; Section of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy; Departments of Endocrinology and Oncologia Medica, Università Cattolica del S. Cuore, Rome, Italy; Departments of Medical and Surgical Sciences and Medical Oncology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy; Oncology, Antonio Cardarelli Hospital, Naples, Italy; Division of Medical Oncology and Endocrinology Unit, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute Rome, IRCCS, Rome, Italy; Oncology, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, Orbassano, Torino, Italy; Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University of Naples, Naples, Italy; Oncology, Fondazione Poliambulanza, Brescia, Italy; Oncology, Istituto Oncologico Veneto, Padova, Italy; Departments of Medical Oncology and Pancreatic Surgery, AOU Ospedali Riuniti, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Oncology, S. Croce e Carle Hospital, Cuneo, Italy; Department of Medical Oncology A, IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Genova, Italy; Oncologia Medica 1, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Florence, Italy; Oncology, Niguarda Cancer Center, Ospedale Niguarda Ca' Granda, Milan, Italy; Oncologia, Spedali Civili di Brescia, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy gianfranco.dellefave@uniroma1.it. ·Oncologist · Pubmed #25117065.

ABSTRACT: Everolimus is a valid therapeutic option for neuroendocrine tumors (NETs); however, data in a real-world setting outside regulatory trials are sparse. The aim of this study was to determine everolimus tolerability and efficacy, in relation to previous treatments, in a compassionate use program. A total of 169 patients with advanced progressive NETs treated with everolimus were enrolled, including 85 with pancreatic NETs (pNETs) and 84 with nonpancreatic NETs (non-pNETs). Previous treatments included somatostatin analogs (92.9%), peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT; 50.3%), chemotherapy (49.7%), and PRRT and chemotherapy (22.8%). Overall, 85.2% of patients experienced adverse events (AEs), which were severe (grade 3-4) in 46.1%. The most frequent severe AEs were pneumonitis (8.3%), thrombocytopenia (7.7%), anemia (5.3%), and renal failure (3.5%). In patients previously treated with PRRT and chemotherapy, a 12-fold increased risk for severe toxicity was observed, with grade 3-4 AEs reported in 86.8% (vs. 34.3% in other patients). In addition, 63.3% of patients required temporarily everolimus discontinuation due to toxicity. Overall, 27.8% of patients died during a median follow-up of 12 months. Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 12 months and 32 months, respectively. Similar disease control rates, PFS, and OS were reported in pNETs and non-pNETs. In the real-world setting, everolimus is safe and effective for the treatment of NETs of different origins. Higher severe toxicity occurred in patients previously treated with systemic chemotherapy and PRRT. This finding prompts caution when using this drug in pretreated patients and raises the issue of planning for everolimus before PRRT and chemotherapy in the therapeutic algorithm for advanced NETs.

8 Article Impact of systemic and tumor lipid metabolism on everolimus efficacy in advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs). 2019

Vernieri, Claudio / Pusceddu, Sara / Fucà, Giovanni / Indelicato, Pietro / Centonze, Giovanni / Castagnoli, Lorenzo / Ferrari, Elisa / Ajazi, Arta / Pupa, Serenella / Casola, Stefano / Foiani, Marco / Mazzaferro, Vincenzo / Pruneri, Giancarlo / Milione, Massimo / de Braud, Filippo. ·Medical Oncology Department, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · IFOM, the FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Molecular Targeting Unit, Department of Research, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Oncology and Haemato-Oncology Department, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Hepato-Bilio-Pancreatic Surgery and Liver Transplantation, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · School of Medicine, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #30520016.

ABSTRACT: The mTOR inhibitor everolimus is effective against advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs). However, it can cause metabolic adverse events, such as hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolemia. In this work we aimed at evaluating the impact of systemic and tumor lipid metabolism on everolimus efficacy. We carried out a monocentric, retrospective study to correlate plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels with the progression free survival (PFS) of advanced pNET patients treated with everolimus. In formalin fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE) tumor specimens, we also assessed by mRNA quantification and immunohistochemistry the expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) and fatty acid synthase (FASN), two enzymes crucially involved in fatty acid biosynthesis, and we analyzed their impact on PFS. We evaluated 58 consecutive pNET patients who started everolimus between December 2006 and January 2015. Patients with higher plasma triglycerides during the first 3 months of treatment had an increased risk of disease progression (aHR 3.08, 95% CIs 1.15-8.21; p = 0.025). In 23 FFPE tumor specimens amenable for IHC evaluations, we found a positive correlation between ACC1 and FASN at both mRNA (r = 0.87, p = 0.00045) and protein (r = 0.68, p = 0.0004) level. Patients with higher ACC1 protein expression in metastatic lesions had significantly lower PFS when compared to patients with lower ACC1 levels (5.5 vs. 36 months; aHR 4.49, 95% CIs 1.08-18.72; p = 0.039). In conclusion, systemic and tumor lipid metabolism are associated with the PFS of everolimus-treated patients with advanced pNETs; based on these findings, dietary and pharmacological interventions targeting lipid metabolism could improve everolimus efficacy in this patient population.

9 Article Metformin Use Is Associated With Longer Progression-Free Survival of Patients With Diabetes and Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors Receiving Everolimus and/or Somatostatin Analogues. 2018

Pusceddu, Sara / Vernieri, Claudio / Di Maio, Massimo / Marconcini, Riccardo / Spada, Francesca / Massironi, Sara / Ibrahim, Toni / Brizzi, Maria Pia / Campana, Davide / Faggiano, Antongiulio / Giuffrida, Dario / Rinzivillo, Maria / Cingarlini, Sara / Aroldi, Francesca / Antonuzzo, Lorenzo / Berardi, Rossana / Catena, Laura / De Divitiis, Chiara / Ermacora, Paola / Perfetti, Vittorio / Fontana, Annalisa / Razzore, Paola / Carnaghi, Carlo / Davì, Maria Vittoria / Cauchi, Carolina / Duro, Marilina / Ricci, Sergio / Fazio, Nicola / Cavalcoli, Federica / Bongiovanni, Alberto / La Salvia, Anna / Brighi, Nicole / Colao, Annamaria / Puliafito, Ivana / Panzuto, Francesco / Ortolani, Silvia / Zaniboni, Alberto / Di Costanzo, Francesco / Torniai, Mariangela / Bajetta, Emilio / Tafuto, Salvatore / Garattini, Silvio Ken / Femia, Daniela / Prinzi, Natalie / Concas, Laura / Lo Russo, Giuseppe / Milione, Massimo / Giacomelli, Luca / Buzzoni, Roberto / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Mazzaferro, Vincenzo / de Braud, Filippo. ·Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: sara.pusceddu@istitutotumori.mi.it. · Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy; Fondazione Istituto FIRC di Oncologia Molecolare (IFOM), Milan, Italy. · Dipartimento di Oncologia, Università degli Studi di Torino, A. O. Ordine Mauriziano, Turin, Italy. · Dipartimento di Oncologia, Santa Chiara Hospital, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Pisa, Italy. · IEO - Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy. · Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. · Centro di Osteoncologia e Tumori Rari, Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Meldola, Italy. · Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San Luigi Gonzaga, Orbassano, Italy. · Policlinico Sant'Orsola Malpighi, Bologna, Italy. · Unità di chirurgia tiroidea e paratiroidea, Istituto Nazionale per lo studio e la cura dei tumori "Fondazione G. Pascale" - IRCCS, Naples, Italy. · IOM- Istituto Oncologico del Mediterraneo, Catania, Italy. · Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Sant'Andrea, ENETS Center of Excellence, Rome, Italy. · Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria, Verona, Italy. · Fondazione Poliambulanza, Brescia, Italy. · A. O. U. Careggi, Firenze, Italy. · Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Ospedali Riuniti, Ancona, Italy. · Policlinico di Monza, Monza, Italy. · IRCCS Fondazione Pascale, ENETS Center of Excellence, Naples, Italy. · Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Santa Maria della Misericordia, Udine, Italy. · Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, SC oncologia, Pavia, Italy. · Policlinico di Modena, Italy. · Unit of Endocrinology, Ospedale Mauriziano, Torino, Italy. · Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano, ENETS Center of Excellence, Italy. · Ospedale Policlinico Borgo Roma, Verona, Italy. · Ospedale S Croce e Carle, Cuneo, Italy. · Ospedale Valduce Como, Italy. · Endocrinology Section, Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, "Federico II" University of Naples, Italy. · Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy. · Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy; Medical-Surgical Science and Traslational Medicine Departement, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy. · Department of Surgical Sciences and Integrated Diagnostics, University of Genoa, Italy. · Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, ENETS Center of Excellence, Milan, Italy; Universita' degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #29655834.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: Metformin seems to have anticancer effects. However, it is not clear whether use of glycemia and metformin affect outcomes of patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs). We investigated the association between glycemia and progression-free survival (PFS) of patients with pNETs treated with everolimus and/or somatostatin analogues, as well as the association between metformin use and PFS time. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of 445 patients with advanced pNET treated at 24 medical centers in Italy from 1999 through 2015. Data on levels of glycemia were collected at time of diagnosis of pNET, before treatment initiation, and during treatment with everolimus (with or without somatostatin analogues), octreotide, or lanreotide. Diabetes was defined as prior or current use of glycemia control medication and/or fasting plasma glucose level ≥ 126 mg/dL, hemoglobin A1c ≥ 6.5% (48 mmol/L), or a random sample of plasma glucose ≥ 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L), with reported classic symptoms of hyperglycemia or hyperglycemic crisis. Patients were assigned to groups based on diagnosis of diabetes before or during antitumor therapy. PFS was compared between patients with vs without diabetes. Among patients with diabetes, the association between metformin use and PFS was assessed. We performed sensitivity and landmark analyses to exclude patients who developed diabetes while receiving cancer treatment and to exclude a potential immortal time bias related to metformin intake. RESULTS: PFS was significantly longer in patients with diabetes (median, 32.0 months) than without diabetes (median, 15.1 months) (hazard ratio for patients with vs without diabetes, 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.50-0.80; P = .0002). PFS of patients treated with metformin was significantly longer (median PFS, 44.2 months) than for patients without diabetes (hazard ratio for survival of patients with diabetes receiving metformin vs without diabetes, 0.45; 95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.62; P < .00001) and longer than for patients with diabetes receiving other treatments (median PFS, 20.8 months; hazard ratio, 0.49; 95% confidence interval, 0.34-0.69; P < .0001). In multivariable analysis, adjusted for other factors associated with outcomes, metformin was associated with longer PFS but level of glycemia was not. Metformin was associated with increased PFS of patients receiving somatostatin analogues and in those receiving everolimus, with or without somatostatin analogues. Sensitivity and landmark analyses produced similar results. CONCLUSIONS: In a retrospective study of patients with pNETs, we found a significant association between metformin use and longer PFS.

10 Article Prognostic impact of the cumulative dose and dose intensity of everolimus in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2017

Berardi, Rossana / Torniai, Mariangela / Pusceddu, Sara / Spada, Francesca / Ibrahim, Toni / Brizzi, Maria Pia / Antonuzzo, Lorenzo / Ferolla, Piero / Panzuto, Francesco / Silvestris, Nicola / Partelli, Stefano / Ferretti, Benedetta / Freddari, Federica / Gucciardino, Calogero / Testa, Enrica / Concas, Laura / Murgioni, Sabina / Bongiovanni, Alberto / Zichi, Clizia / Riva, Nada / Rinzivillo, Maria / Brunetti, Oronzo / Giustini, Lucio / Di Costanzo, Francesco / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Fazio, Nicola / De Braud, Filippo / Falconi, Massimo / Cascinu, Stefano. ·Clinica di Oncologia Medica, Università Politecnica delle Marche, AOU Ospedali Riuniti di, Ancona, Italy. · Medicina Oncologica 1, ENETS Center of excellence, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Tumori, Milano, Italy. · Unità di Oncologia Medica Gastrointestinale e Tumori Neuroendocrini (Unit of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology and Neuroendocrine Tumors), IEO Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Milano, Italy. · Osteoncology and Rare Tumors Center, Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Meldola, Italy. · Oncologia Medica, A.O.U. San Luigi, Orbassano (TO), Italy. · SC di Oncologia Medica, Azienda Opedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Firenze, Italy. · Doctorate Course in Genetics, Oncology and Clinical Medicine, University of Siena, Siena, Italy. · Multidisciplinary NET Group, Umbria Regional Cancer Network, Perugia, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease, Sapienza University of Rome, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Rome, Italy. · Medical Oncology Unit, National Cancer Institute Giovanni Paolo II, Bari, Italy. · Chirurgia del Pancreas, Università Politecnica delle Marche, AOU Ospedali Riuniti di, Ancona, Italy. · Chirurgia del Pancreas, Ospedale San Raffaele IRCCS, Università Vita e Salute, Milano, Italy. · Oncologia Medica, Ospedale di San Severino, San Severino Marche (MC), Italy. · Oncologia Medica, Ospedale di Senigallia, Senigallia, Italy. · Oncologia Medica, Ospedale di Fermo, Fermo, Italy. · Oncologia Medica, Ospedale di Urbino, Urbino, Italy. · Oncologia Medica, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy. ·Cancer Med · Pubmed #28547856.

ABSTRACT: The aim of this work is to assess if cumulative dose (CD) and dose intensity (DI) of everolimus may affect survival of advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) patients. One hundred and sixteen patients (62 males and 54 females, median age 55 years) with advanced PNETs were treated with everolimus for ≥3 months. According to a Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis, patients were stratified into two groups, with CD ≤ 3000 mg (Group A; n = 68) and CD > 3000 mg (Group B; n = 48). The response rate and toxicity were comparable in the two groups. However, patients in group A experienced more dose modifications than patients in group B. Median OS was 24 months in Group A while in Group B it was not reached (HR: 26.9; 95% CI: 11.0-76.7; P < 0.0001). Patients who maintained a DI higher than 9 mg/day experienced a significantly longer OS and experienced a trend to higher response rate. Overall, our study results showed that both CD and DI of everolimus play a prognostic role for patients with advanced PNETs treated with everolimus. This should prompt efforts to continue everolimus administration in responsive patients up to at least 3000 mg despite delays or temporary interruptions.

11 Article Clinical Impact of Pancreatic Metastases from Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Multicenter Retrospective Analysis. 2016

Grassi, Paolo / Doucet, Ludovic / Giglione, Palma / Grünwald, Viktor / Melichar, Bohuslav / Galli, Luca / De Giorgi, Ugo / Sabbatini, Roberto / Ortega, Cinzia / Santoni, Matteo / Bamias, Aristotelis / Verzoni, Elena / Derosa, Lisa / Studentova, Hana / Pacifici, Monica / Coppa, Jorgelina / Mazzaferro, Vincenzo / de Braud, Filippo / Porta, Camillo / Escudier, Bernard / Procopio, Giuseppe. ·Medical Oncology 1, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, via G. Venezian 1, 20133, Milano, Italy. · Gustave Roussy, 114 Rue Edouard Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif, France. · Medical Oncology, IRCCS San Matteo University Hospital Foundation, Viale Camillo Golgi, 19, 27100, Pavia, Italy. · Clinic for Haematology, Hemostasis, Oncology and Stemcelltransplantation, Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Strasse 1, 30625, Hannover, Germany. · Dept of Oncology, Palacký University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, I.P. Pavlova 6, 775 20, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Medical Oncology 2, A.O.U.P., Istituto Toscano Tumori, via Roma 67, 56126, Pisa, Italy. · Dept of Medical Oncology, Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, via P. Maroncelli 40, 47014, Meldola, Italy. · Dept of Oncology and Haematology and Respiratory Disease, University Hospital, Via del Pozzo 71, 41124, Modena, Italy. · Medical Oncology 1 - Candiolo Cancer Institute-FPO, IRCCS, Strada Provinciale, 142 km 3,95, 10060, Candiolo, Italy. · Medical Oncology, AOU Ospedali Riuniti, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Via Conca, 71, 60126, Ancona, Italy. · Dept of Clinical Therapeutics, Alexandra General Hospital, V. Sofias and Lourou 1 11528, Athens, Greece. · Medical Statistics, Trial Center, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, via G. Venezian 1, 20133, Milano, Italy. · Gastrointestinal Surgery and Liver Transplantation Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, via G. Venezian 1, 20133, Milano, Italy. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #27064898.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma are uncommon and their prognostic significance is not well defined. In this analysis we evaluated the outcome of patients with pancreatic metastases treated with either targeted therapies or local treatment to the pancreas. Patients with pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma treated between 1993 and 2014 were identified from 11 European centers. Clinical records were retrospectively reviewed. Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test were used to evaluate progression-free survival and overall survival. Cox's proportional hazard models were used for survival analysis. In total, 276 PM patients were evaluated, including 77 (28%) patients treated by either surgery or radiotherapy to the pancreas, and 256 (93%) who received systemic therapy. Median time from nephrectomy to diagnosis of pancreatic metastases was 91 months (IQR 54-142). Disease control rate after first-line TTs was 84%, with a median progression-free survival of 12 months (95% CI 10-14). Median overall survival was 73 months (95% CI 61-86) with a 5-year OS of 58%. Median OS of patients treated with local treatment was 106 months (95% CI 78-204) with a 5-year overall survival of 75%. On multivariable analysis, nephrectomy (HR 5.31; 95%CI 2.36-11.92; p<0.0001), Memorial Sloan Kettering/International Metastatic RCC Database Consortium prognostic score (HR 1.45, 95% CI 0.94-2.23 for intermediate vs good vs risk; HR 2.76 95%, CI 1.43-5.35 for poor vs good risk p = 0.0099) and pancreatic local treatment (HR 0.48; 95%CI 0.30-0.78 p = 0.0029) were associated with overall survival. Difference in median OS between patients with PM and that reported in a matched-control group of mRCC patients with extrapancreatic metastases was statistically significant (p < .0001). Pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma usually occur years after nephrectomy, are associated with an indolent behavior and a prolonged survival. Targeted therapies and locoregional approaches are active and achieve high disease control rate.

12 Article Prognostic role of pancreatic metastases from renal cell carcinoma: results from an Italian center. 2013

Grassi, Paolo / Verzoni, Elena / Mariani, Luigi / De Braud, Filippo / Coppa, Jorgelina / Mazzaferro, Vincenzo / Procopio, Giuseppe. ·Medical Oncology Unit 1, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, Italy. ·Clin Genitourin Cancer · Pubmed #23791435.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic metastasis accounts for 2% to 11% of all mRCC cases. The prognostic value of pancreatic metastases in the era of TTs is unclear. We evaluated outcomes in a cohort of mRCC patients with pancreatic metastases (PmRCC) who were treated with TTs. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 354 mRCC patients treated at our institute between January 2005 and June 2012. Differences in terms of OS between this unselected cohort of mRCC patients and a subgroup of patients with PmRCC were investigated. Kaplan-Meier and log-rank test methods were used to evaluate OS. RESULTS: In total, 24 PmRCC (7%) patients were identified, and were compared with a cohort of 330 mRCC patients with metastasis at other sites. Pancreatic metastases were synchronous in 3 patients, and they were metachronous in 11 patients. Surgical resection of pancreatic metastases was performed in 2 (8%) patients. At a maximum follow-up of 89 months (median, 51 months), median OS was 39 months in PmRCC patients, vs. 23 months in the mRCC patient group (P = .0004). CONCLUSION: Among mRCC patients treated with TTs, the presence of pancreatic metastasis seems to be associated with a longer survival than the presence of metastasis at other sites.

13 Article Metastatic and locally advanced pancreatic endocrine carcinomas: analysis of factors associated with disease progression. 2011

Panzuto, Francesco / Boninsegna, Letizia / Fazio, Nicola / Campana, Davide / Pia Brizzi, Maria / Capurso, Gabriele / Scarpa, Aldo / De Braud, Filippo / Dogliotti, Luigi / Tomassetti, Paola / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Falconi, Massimo. ·II School of Medicine, Sapienza University of Roma, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Via di Grottarossa 1035, Rome, Italy. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #21555696.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Knowledge of clinical course of pancreatic endocrine carcinomas (PECs) is poor. This study aimed to determine the time to progression of advanced PECs, and to identify predictors capable of selecting subgroups with higher risk of progression. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this multicenter retrospective analysis, patients with advanced PECs were enrolled. Staging was according to European Neuroendocrine Tumors Society guidelines. Grading was based on proliferation index using Ki67 immunohistochemistry. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS), which was assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method. The Cox regression proportional hazard model was used to identify predictors for tumor progression. RESULTS: Two hundred two patients with PECs were enrolled, including 172 with well-differentiated and 30 with poorly differentiated endocrine carcinomas. There were 34 patients with stage III and 168 with stage IV tumors. G1 tumors were present in 19.7% of patients, whereas 60.1% of patients had G2 tumors, and the remaining 20.2% had G3 tumors. Disease progression occurred in 166 patients (82.2%), at a median interval of 10 months (interquartile range, 5 to 22) from diagnosis. Median PFS was 14 months. Different PFS were observed depending on G grade (P < .001) and tumor differentiation (P < .001) and in patients who did not receive any antitumor treatment (P = .002). The major risk factor for progression was the proliferation index Ki67 (hazard ratio, 1.02 for each increasing unit; P < .001). Overall 5-year survival was 44.1%. CONCLUSION: The vast majority of patients with advanced PECs undergo disease progression. The major risk factor for progression is Ki67 index, which should lead physicians dealing with PECs to plan appropriate follow-up programs and therapeutic strategies.

14 Minor Pancreatic well-differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasms (pWDNENs): what place for everolimus and sunitinib derived from ESMO clinical practice guidelines in the therapeutic algorithm? 2013

Pusceddu, S / Buzzoni, R / De Braud, F. · ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #23493138.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --