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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Bing-Yan Zhu
Based on 7 articles published since 2010
(Why 7 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Bin Zhu wrote the following 7 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Oral microbial community composition is associated with pancreatic cancer: A case-control study in Iran. 2020

Vogtmann, Emily / Han, Yongli / Caporaso, J Gregory / Bokulich, Nicholas / Mohamadkhani, Ashraf / Moayyedkazemi, Alireza / Hua, Xing / Kamangar, Farin / Wan, Yunhu / Suman, Shalabh / Zhu, Bin / Hutchinson, Amy / Dagnall, Casey / Jones, Kristine / Hicks, Belynda / Shi, Jianxin / Malekzadeh, Reza / Abnet, Christian C / Pourshams, Akram. ·Metabolic Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Biostatistics Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Center for Applied Microbiome Science, Pathogen and Microbiome Institute, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, USA. · Digestive Oncology Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · Department of Internal Medicine, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Khorramabad, Iran. · Liver and Pancreatobiliary Diseases Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · Department of Biology, School of Computer, Mathematical, and Natural Sciences, Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Leidos Biomedical Research Laboratory, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD, USA. · Digestive Disease Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. ·Cancer Med · Pubmed #31750624.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Oral microbiota may be related to pancreatic cancer risk because periodontal disease, a condition linked to multiple specific microbes, has been associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We evaluated the association between oral microbiota and pancreatic cancer in Iran. METHODS: A total of 273 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases and 285 controls recruited from tertiary hospitals and a specialty clinic in Tehran, Iran provided saliva samples and filled out a questionnaire regarding demographics and lifestyle characteristics. DNA was extracted from saliva and the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene was PCR amplified and sequenced on the MiSeq. The sequencing data were processed using the DADA2 plugin in QIIME 2 and taxonomy was assigned against the Human Oral Microbiome Database. Logistic regression and MiRKAT models were calculated with adjustment for potential confounders. RESULTS: No association was observed for alpha diversity with an average of 91.11 (standard deviation [SD] 2.59) sequence variants for cases and 89.42 (SD 2.58) for controls. However, there was evidence for an association between beta diversity and case status. The association between the Bray-Curtis dissimilarity and pancreatic cancer was particularly strong with a MiRKAT P-value of .000142 and specific principal coordinate vectors had strong associations with cancer risk. Several specific taxa were also associated with case status after adjustment for multiple comparisons. CONCLUSION: The overall microbial community appeared to differ between pancreatic cancer cases and controls. Whether these reflect differences evident before development of pancreatic cancer will need to be evaluated in prospective studies.

2 Article Characterising 2018

Zhang, Mingfeng / Lykke-Andersen, Soren / Zhu, Bin / Xiao, Wenming / Hoskins, Jason W / Zhang, Xijun / Rost, Lauren M / Collins, Irene / Bunt, Martijn van de / Jia, Jinping / Parikh, Hemang / Zhang, Tongwu / Song, Lei / Jermusyk, Ashley / Chung, Charles C / Zhu, Bin / Zhou, Weiyin / Matters, Gail L / Kurtz, Robert C / Yeager, Meredith / Jensen, Torben Heick / Brown, Kevin M / Ongen, Halit / Bamlet, William R / Murray, Bradley A / McCarthy, Mark I / Chanock, Stephen J / Chatterjee, Nilanjan / Wolpin, Brian M / Smith, Jill P / Olson, Sara H / Petersen, Gloria M / Shi, Jianxin / Amundadottir, Laufey. ·Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Biostatistics Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Division of Bioinformatics and Biostatistics, National Center for Toxicological Research, FDA, Jefferson, Missouri, USA. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc, Frederick, Maryland, USA. · Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolism, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Health Informatics Institute, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA. · Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York City, New York, USA. · Department of Genetic Medicine and Development, University of Geneva Medical School, Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Division of Epidemiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · The Eli and Edythe L Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University Cambridge, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. · Oxford NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, Churchill Hospital, Headington, Oxford, UK. · Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, D.C., USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York City, New York, USA. ·Gut · Pubmed #28634199.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To elucidate the genetic architecture of gene expression in pancreatic tissues. DESIGN: We performed expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis in histologically normal pancreatic tissue samples (n=95) using RNA sequencing and the corresponding 1000 genomes imputed germline genotypes. Data from pancreatic tumour-derived tissue samples (n=115) from The Cancer Genome Atlas were included for comparison. RESULTS: We identified 38 615 CONCLUSIONS: We have identified

3 Article A new HDAC inhibitor cinnamoylphenazine shows antitumor activity in association with intensive macropinocytosis. 2017

Zhu, Bing-Yan / Shang, Bo-Yang / Du, Yue / Li, Yi / Li, Liang / Xu, Xian-Dong / Zhen, Yong-Su. ·Institute of Medicinal Biotechnology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100050, China. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #28107195.

ABSTRACT: Previous studies have shown that intensive macropinocytosis occurs in cancer cells and neutral red (NR) is noted for its capability to enter into the cell massively through a process mimetic to macropinocytosis. In addition, trans-cinnamic acid (tCA) has been found to be an inhibitor of histone deacetylase (HDAC). In the present study, cinnamoylphenazine (CA-PZ) that consists of NR and tCA moieties was synthesized and evaluated. As shown, CA-PZ massively entered into colon carcinoma HT-29 cells and pancreatic carcinoma MIA PaCa-2 cells and this entry was blocked by 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride (EIPA, an inhibitor of macropinocytosis), indicating a macropinocytosis-mediated uptake. Furthermore, CA-PZ markedly increased the protein expression levels of acetyl-H3, acetyl-H4 and p21 in HT-29 cells and MIA PaCa-2 cells. CA-PZ significantly inhibited the growth of colon carcinoma HT-29 and pancreatic carcinoma MIA PaCa-2 xenografts. By in vivo imaging, CA-PZ displayed prominent accumulation in the tumor xenografts. The study indicates that the newly synthesized CA-PZ acts as an HDAC inhibitor in association with intensive macropinocytosis-mediated intracellular delivery in cancer cells. The use of neutral red for preparation of chimeric molecules with the attribute of macropinocytosis-mediated intracellular delivery might open an alternative way for development of HDAC inhibitors.

4 Article Multiple rare variants in high-risk pancreatic cancer-related genes may increase risk for pancreatic cancer in a subset of patients with and without germline CDKN2A mutations. 2016

Yang, Xiaohong R / Rotunno, Melissa / Xiao, Yanzi / Ingvar, Christian / Helgadottir, Hildur / Pastorino, Lorenza / van Doorn, Remco / Bennett, Hunter / Graham, Cole / Sampson, Joshua N / Malasky, Michael / Vogt, Aurelie / Zhu, Bin / Bianchi-Scarra, Giovanna / Bruno, William / Queirolo, Paola / Fornarini, Giuseppe / Hansson, Johan / Tuominen, Rainer / Burdett, Laurie / Hicks, Belynda / Hutchinson, Amy / Jones, Kristine / Yeager, Meredith / Chanock, Stephen J / Landi, Maria Teresa / Höiom, Veronica / Olsson, Håkan / Gruis, Nelleke / Ghiorzo, Paola / Tucker, Margaret A / Goldstein, Alisa M. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Studies, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Department of Surgery, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Oncology Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy. · Genetics of Rare Cancers, IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Genoa, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick, MD, USA. · Medical Oncology Unit, IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Genoa, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. goldstea@mail.nih.gov. · , 9609 Medical Center Dr, Bethesda, MD, 20892-9769, USA. goldstea@mail.nih.gov. ·Hum Genet · Pubmed #27449771.

ABSTRACT: The risk of pancreatic cancer (PC) is increased in melanoma-prone families but the causal relationship between germline CDKN2A mutations and PC risk is uncertain, suggesting the existence of non-CDKN2A factors. One genetic possibility involves patients having mutations in multiple high-risk PC-related genes; however, no systematic examination has yet been conducted. We used next-generation sequencing data to examine 24 putative PC-related genes in 43 PC patients with and 23 PC patients without germline CDKN2A mutations and 1001 controls. For each gene and the four pathways in which they occurred, we tested whether PC patients (overall or CDKN2A+ and CDKN2A- cases separately) had an increased number of rare nonsynonymous variants. Overall, we identified 35 missense variants in PC patients, 14 in CDKN2A+ and 21 in CDKN2A- PC cases. We found nominally significant associations for mismatch repair genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2) in all PC patients and for ATM, CPA1, and PMS2 in CDKN2A- PC patients. Further, nine CDKN2A+ and four CDKN2A- PC patients had rare potentially deleterious variants in multiple PC-related genes. Loss-of-function variants were only observed in CDKN2A- PC patients, with ATM having the most pathogenic variants. Also, ATM variants (n = 5) were only observed in CDKN2A- PC patients with a family history that included digestive system tumors. Our results suggest that a subset of PC patients may have increased risk because of germline mutations in multiple PC-related genes.

5 Article Immunoprofile of mucinous non-neoplastic cyst of the pancreas. 2013

Zhu, Bing / Lin, Xiaoqi. ·Department of Pathology, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. ·Appl Immunohistochem Mol Morphol · Pubmed #22820665.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A recently described mucinous non-neoplastic cyst (MNNC) of the pancreas is a benign cyst and should be distinguished from mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN) and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) due to different management and prognosis. The immunoprofile of MNNC has not been well studied. DESIGN: Twenty-three MNNCs diagnosed on surgical resection were retrieved. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining was performed on surgically resected specimen. Sixteen IPMN and 15 MCN cases were also retrieved for comparison. Cyst fluid carcinoembryonic antigen and amylase concentrations were retrieved. RESULT: MNNCs were randomly located in the pancreas and were either unilocular or multilocular cysts that were lined by a single layer of bland columnar or cuboidal mucinous cells and supported by paucicellular stroma. The glandular epithelial cells were diffusely positive for CK7 (100%) and PDX-1 (65%); focally positive for CD10 (superficial, 65%), CD99 (basally, 100%), CDX-2 (17%), and CK20 (4%); and negative for MUC2. Only rare stromal cells in the cyst wall were weakly positive for estrogen receptor or progesterone receptor in only 6% of cases and negative for inhibin. These results were also compared with the immunoprofile of IPMN and MCN. CONCLUSIONS: Although MNNC shares some IHC markers with IPMN or MCN, an IHC panel can help distinguish MNNC from IPMN or MCN. The results suggest that MNNC is different from IPMN and MCN.

6 Article Fine needle aspiration cytomorphology of mucinous nonneoplastic cyst of the pancreas. 2013

Zhu, Bing / Keswani, Rajesh N / Lin, Xiaoqi. ·Department of Pathology, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #22750967.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytomorphology of mucinous nonneoplastic cyst (MNNC) of the pancreas has not been described. METHODS: Nineteen of 24 patients with surgically diagnosed MNNCs had presurgery endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-FNA biopsy. The FNA cytomorphology was retrospectively evaluated. Cyst fluid carcinoembryonic antigen and amylase concentrations were measured. RESULTS: Endoscopic US-FNA diagnoses ranged from unsatisfactory to suspicious for adenocarcinoma. Endoscopic US-FNA cytologic findings showed cuboidal or columnar cells arranged in flat 'honeycomb' sheets/nests (100.0%), papillary architecture (10.5%), acini formation (10.5%), 3-dimensional cluster (5.3%), abundant single cell pattern (5.3%), goblet cells (17.4%), and delicate or vacuolated (60.9%) cytoplasm variable in amount. Nuclei were round or oval and small to slightly enlarged with 1 or 2 inconspicuous nucleoli, fine granular chromatin, and smooth nuclear contour (irregular in 1 case). Nuclear grooves (43.5%) and nuclear pseudoinclusions (26.1%) were identified. Most cases showed thin mucin and thick mucin in 4 cases. Stroma was seen in 4 cases (17.4%). Degenerated cells/necrotic material and macrophages were also seen. Carcinoembryonic antigen ranged from 75.2 to 5,488 ng/ml and amylase from 19 to 28,478 U/L. CONCLUSIONS: Recognition of FNA cytomorphology of MNNC and valuable of carcinoembryonic antigen and amylase levels in cyst fluid is critical in clinical evaluation of pancreatic cysts.

7 Article Screening for depression, sleep-related disturbances, and anxiety in patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas: a preliminary study. 2012

Boyd, Andrew D / Brown, Doris / Henrickson, Chris / Hampton, Janet / Zhu, Bin / Almani, Farideh / Ben-Josef, Edgar / Zalupski, Mark / Simeone, Diane M / Taylor, Jeremy M G / Armitage, Roseanne / Riba, Michelle. ·Department of Biomedical and Health Information Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1919 W Taylor Street MC 530, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. boyda@uic.edu ·ScientificWorldJournal · Pubmed #22666142.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Screening for depression, sleep-related disturbances, and anxiety in patients with diagnosed adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients were evaluated at initial consultation and subsequent visits at the multidisciplinary pancreatic cancer clinic at our University Cancer Center. Cross-sectional and longitudinal psychosocial distress was assessed utilizing Personal Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ9) to screen for depression and monitor symptoms, the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ) for generalized anxiety, and the University of Michigan Sleep Questionnaire to monitor sleep symptoms. RESULTS: Twenty-two patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer participated during the 6-month pilot study with longitudinal followup for thirteen patients. In this study, mild-to-moderate depressive symptoms, anxiety, and potential sleep problems were common. The main finding of the study was 23% of the patients who were part of this pilot project screened positive for moderately severe major depressive symptoms, likely anxiety disorder or a potential sleep disorder during the study. One patient screened positive for moderately severe depressive symptoms in longitudinal followup. CONCLUSIONS: Depression, anxiety, and sleep problems are evident in patients with pancreatic cancer. Prospective, longitudinal studies, with larger groups of patients, are needed to determine if these comorbid symptoms impact outcome and clinical course.