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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Siyuan Zheng
Based on 2 articles published since 2010
(Why 2 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Siyuan Zheng wrote the following 2 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Integrative Genomic Analysis of Cholangiocarcinoma Identifies Distinct IDH-Mutant Molecular Profiles. 2017

Farshidfar, Farshad / Zheng, Siyuan / Gingras, Marie-Claude / Newton, Yulia / Shih, Juliann / Robertson, A Gordon / Hinoue, Toshinori / Hoadley, Katherine A / Gibb, Ewan A / Roszik, Jason / Covington, Kyle R / Wu, Chia-Chin / Shinbrot, Eve / Stransky, Nicolas / Hegde, Apurva / Yang, Ju Dong / Reznik, Ed / Sadeghi, Sara / Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar / Ojesina, Akinyemi I / Hess, Julian M / Auman, J Todd / Rhie, Suhn K / Bowlby, Reanne / Borad, Mitesh J / Anonymous5350899 / Zhu, Andrew X / Stuart, Josh M / Sander, Chris / Akbani, Rehan / Cherniack, Andrew D / Deshpande, Vikram / Mounajjed, Taofic / Foo, Wai Chin / Torbenson, Michael S / Kleiner, David E / Laird, Peter W / Wheeler, David A / McRee, Autumn J / Bathe, Oliver F / Andersen, Jesper B / Bardeesy, Nabeel / Roberts, Lewis R / Kwong, Lawrence N. ·Departments of Surgery and Oncology, Arnie Charbonneau Cancer Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 4N1, Canada. · Departments of Genomic Medicine, Melanoma Medical Oncology, Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, Pathology, and Translational Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA. · The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA; Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02215, USA. · Canada's Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4S6, Canada. · Center for Epigenetics, Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, MI 49503, USA. · Departments of Genetics and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. · Blueprint Medicines, 38 Sidney Street, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. · Divisions of Gastroenterology and Hepatology and Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10005, USA. · University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA; HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology, Huntsville, AL 35806, USA. · The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. · Departments of Genetics and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. · USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA. · Division of Hematology and Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ 85054, USA. · Departments of Hematology and Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Departments of Pathology and Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. · Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. · Biotech Research and Innovation Centre, Department of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen 2200, Denmark. Electronic address: jesper.andersen@bric.ku.dk. · Departments of Pathology and Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Electronic address: bardeesy.nabeel@mgh.harvard.edu. · Divisions of Gastroenterology and Hepatology and Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. Electronic address: roberts.lewis@mayo.edu. · Departments of Genomic Medicine, Melanoma Medical Oncology, Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, Pathology, and Translational Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address: lkwong@mdanderson.org. ·Cell Rep · Pubmed #28297679.

ABSTRACT: Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is an aggressive malignancy of the bile ducts, with poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Here, we describe the integrated analysis of somatic mutations, RNA expression, copy number, and DNA methylation by The Cancer Genome Atlas of a set of predominantly intrahepatic CCA cases and propose a molecular classification scheme. We identified an IDH mutant-enriched subtype with distinct molecular features including low expression of chromatin modifiers, elevated expression of mitochondrial genes, and increased mitochondrial DNA copy number. Leveraging the multi-platform data, we observed that ARID1A exhibited DNA hypermethylation and decreased expression in the IDH mutant subtype. More broadly, we found that IDH mutations are associated with an expanded histological spectrum of liver tumors with molecular features that stratify with CCA. Our studies reveal insights into the molecular pathogenesis and heterogeneity of cholangiocarcinoma and provide classification information of potential therapeutic significance.

2 Article dmGWAS: dense module searching for genome-wide association studies in protein-protein interaction networks. 2011

Jia, Peilin / Zheng, Siyuan / Long, Jirong / Zheng, Wei / Zhao, Zhongming. ·Department of Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232, USA. ·Bioinformatics · Pubmed #21045073.

ABSTRACT: MOTIVATION: An important question that has emerged from the recent success of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) is how to detect genetic signals beyond single markers/genes in order to explore their combined effects on mediating complex diseases and traits. Integrative testing of GWAS association data with that from prior-knowledge databases and proteome studies has recently gained attention. These methodologies may hold promise for comprehensively examining the interactions between genes underlying the pathogenesis of complex diseases. METHODS: Here, we present a dense module searching (DMS) method to identify candidate subnetworks or genes for complex diseases by integrating the association signal from GWAS datasets into the human protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. The DMS method extensively searches for subnetworks enriched with low P-value genes in GWAS datasets. Compared with pathway-based approaches, this method introduces flexibility in defining a gene set and can effectively utilize local PPI information. RESULTS: We implemented the DMS method in an R package, which can also evaluate and graphically represent the results. We demonstrated DMS in two GWAS datasets for complex diseases, i.e. breast cancer and pancreatic cancer. For each disease, the DMS method successfully identified a set of significant modules and candidate genes, including some well-studied genes not detected in the single-marker analysis of GWA studies. Functional enrichment analysis and comparison with previously published methods showed that the genes we identified by DMS have higher association signal. AVAILABILITY: dmGWAS package and documents are available at http://bioinfo.mc.vanderbilt.edu/dmGWAS.html.