Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by F. Zhang
Based on 3 articles published since 2010
(Why 3 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, F. Zhang wrote the following 3 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Clinical Trial Clinical assessment of palliative radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer. 2018

Tian, Q / Zhang, F / Wang, Y. ·Department of Radiotherapy, The General Hospital of Jinan Military Command, Jinan, Shandong Province, PR China. · Department of Gastroenterology, Shandong Provincial Hospital affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong Province, PR China. · Department of Radiotherapy, The General Hospital of Jinan Military Command, Jinan, Shandong Province, PR China. Electronic address: ymwang64@163.com. ·Cancer Radiother · Pubmed #30401617.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To evaluate the feasibility and response to radiotherapy for improving the symptoms and quality of life in patients with pancreatic cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We enrolled 31 eligible patients (20 men, 11 women) with pancreatic cancer who were receiving radiotherapy from February 2012 to February 2014. The prescribed dose was 40 to 42Gy delivered to the planning target volume in seven to ten fractions of 4 to 6Gy. Patients completed Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), Functional Assessment Of Cancer Therapy-Hepatobiliary (FACT-Hep), and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality Of Life Questionnaire C30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) one week prior to radiotherapy, and one and three months after treatment. The main outcome was the evaluation of the proportion of patients with less pain and reduced clinical symptoms after one month of radiotherapy compared to before treatment according to the BPI, FACT-Hep and EORTC QLQ-C30 scales. RESULTS: Of 31 patients, 28 completed the questionnaires. According to BPI evaluation, symptoms were improved in 57% of patients; the FACT-General (FACT-G) and liver function subscales revealed that there was symptom improvement in 89% and 7.1% of patients, respectively. Six items in the EORTC QLQ-C30 were improved. CONCLUSIONS: Following treatment, pain and clinical symptoms were improved in a considerable proportion of patients with pancreatic cancer, proving that palliative radiotherapy is feasible for pancreatic cancer.

2 Article Percutaneous computed tomography-guided iodine-125 seeds implantation for unresectable pancreatic cancer. 2015

Liu, B / Zhou, T / Geng, J / Zhang, F / Wang, J / Li, Y. ·Department of Interventional Medicine, The Second Hospital of Shandong University, Shandong, Shandong Province, PR of, China. ·Indian J Cancer · Pubmed #26728678.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To examine the safety and clinical efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided radioactive iodine-125 (125I) seeds implantation for patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A group of 26 patients with pathologically confirmed unresectable pancreatic cancer underwent percutaneous CT-guided 125I seeds implantation. Part of them received transarterial chemotherapy and/or percutaneous transhepatic cholangial drainage before or after seeds implantation. The primary endpoints were the objective response rates, local control rates, and overall survival. RESULTS: CT scan 2 months after treatment revealed complete response (CR) in 8 patients, partial response (PR) in 9 patients. Overall response rate (CR + PR) is 65.38%. Local control rate was 88.46%. Median survival of the whole group was 15.3 months, whereas for Stage III and IV was 17.6 and 9.1 months, respectively. The estimated 1-year survival was 30.77%. CONCLUSIONS: We consider CT-guided 125I seeds implantation as a safe, effective, uncomplicated treatment for unresectable pancreatic cancer.

3 Article Heat-shock protein 90 inhibitors synergistically enhance melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7-mediated cell killing of human pancreatic carcinoma. 2013

Zhang, Z / Kawamura, K / Jiang, Y / Shingyoji, M / Ma, G / Li, Q / Hu, J / Qi, Y / Liu, H / Zhang, F / Kang, S / Shan, B / Wang, S / Chada, S / Tagawa, M. ·1] Division of Pathology and Cell Therapy, Chiba Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Chiba, Japan [2] Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, China. · Division of Pathology and Cell Therapy, Chiba Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Chiba, Japan. · 1] Division of Pathology and Cell Therapy, Chiba Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Chiba, Japan [2] Department of Molecular Biology and Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chuo-ku, Chiba, Japan. · Department of Thoracic Diseases, Chiba Cancer Center, Chuo-ku, Chiba, Japan. · 1] Division of Pathology and Cell Therapy, Chiba Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Chiba, Japan [2] Department of Hematology, The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, China. · 1] Division of Pathology and Cell Therapy, Chiba Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Chiba, Japan [2] Department of Molecular Biology and Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chuo-ku, Chiba, Japan [3] Department of Immunology, Basic Medical College, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, China [4] Cell Therapy Center, The First Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, China. · Department of Immunology, Basic Medical College, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, China. · Department of General Surgery, The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, China. · Department of General Surgery, The Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, China. · Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, China. · Research Center, The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, China. · Department of Endoscopy, The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, China. · SVP Translational Medicine, Intrexon Corporation, Germantown, MD, USA. ·Cancer Gene Ther · Pubmed #24263157.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is one of the intractable diseases and an effective therapeutic strategy is required to improve the prognosis. We examined possible antitumor effects of adenoviruses expressing melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7/interleukin-24 (Ad-mda-7) and a heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor to human pancreatic carcinoma cells. Ad-mda-7 and an Hsp90 inhibitor, geldanamycin (GA), produced cytotoxic effects, and a combinatory use of Ad-mda-7 and GA further achieved synergistic effects. Administration of N-acetyl-L-cysteine, an inhibitor of reactive oxygen species, eliminated Ad-mda-7- and GA-mediated cytotoxicity. Ad-mda-7 augmented phosphorylated AKT levels but GA did not influence the phosphorylation. GA-treated cells showed cleavage of poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase but not caspase-3, and upregulated Hsp70 and LC3A/B II levels, whereas Ad-mda-7-treated cells did not. GA treatments augmented ubiquitination and markedly increased melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7 (MDA-7) expression levels. These findings suggest that Ad-mda-7-mediated cytotoxicity is dependent on reactive oxygen species but independent of apoptosis or autophagy, and that GA-mediated cytotoxicity was linked with caspase-independent apoptosis and/or autophagy. A mechanism underlying the combinatory effects of Ad-mda-7 and GA remained complex and the synergism is attributable to multiple factors including increased MDA-7 protein stability by GA.