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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Witold A. Zatonski
Based on 7 articles published since 2010
(Why 7 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, W. Zatonski wrote the following 7 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Menstrual and Reproductive Factors, Hormone Use, and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: Analysis From the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). 2016

Lujan-Barroso, Leila / Zhang, Wei / Olson, Sara H / Gao, Yu-Tang / Yu, Herbert / Baghurst, Peter A / Bracci, Paige M / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Foretová, Lenka / Gallinger, Steven / Holcatova, Ivana / Janout, Vladimír / Ji, Bu-Tian / Kurtz, Robert C / La Vecchia, Carlo / Lagiou, Pagona / Li, Donghui / Miller, Anthony B / Serraino, Diego / Zatonski, Witold / Risch, Harvey A / Duell, Eric J. ·From the *Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain; †Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute and Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China; ‡Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; §Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI; ∥Public Health, Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide, SA, Australia; ¶University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA; #National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven; **Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands; ††Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK; ‡‡Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; §§Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Institute and MF MU, Brno, Czech Republic; ∥∥University Health Network, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; ¶¶Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague; ##Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic; ***National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD; †††Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; ‡‡‡Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy; §§§Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Greece; ∥∥∥Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; ¶¶¶M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX; ###Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; ****Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, CRO Aviano, National Cancer Institute, IRCCS, Aviano, Italy; ††††Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland; and ‡‡‡‡Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #27088489.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: We aimed to evaluate the relation between menstrual and reproductive factors, exogenous hormones, and risk of pancreatic cancer (PC). METHODS: Eleven case-control studies within the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-control Consortium took part in the present study, including in total 2838 case and 4748 control women. Pooled estimates of odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a 2-step logistic regression model and adjusting for relevant covariates. RESULTS: An inverse OR was observed in women who reported having had hysterectomy (ORyesvs.no, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.67-0.91), remaining significant in postmenopausal women and never-smoking women, adjusted for potential PC confounders. A mutually adjusted model with the joint effect for hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and hysterectomy showed significant inverse associations with PC in women who reported having had hysterectomy with HRT use (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.48-0.84). CONCLUSIONS: Our large pooled analysis suggests that women who have had a hysterectomy may have reduced risk of PC. However, we cannot rule out that the reduced risk could be due to factors or indications for having had a hysterectomy. Further investigation of risk according to HRT use and reason for hysterectomy may be necessary.

2 Article Diabetes, antidiabetic medications, and pancreatic cancer risk: an analysis from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium. 2014

Bosetti, C / Rosato, V / Li, D / Silverman, D / Petersen, G M / Bracci, P M / Neale, R E / Muscat, J / Anderson, K / Gallinger, S / Olson, S H / Miller, A B / Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H / Scelo, G / Janout, V / Holcatova, I / Lagiou, P / Serraino, D / Lucenteforte, E / Fabianova, E / Ghadirian, P / Baghurst, P A / Zatonski, W / Foretova, L / Fontham, E / Bamlet, W R / Holly, E A / Negri, E / Hassan, M / Prizment, A / Cotterchio, M / Cleary, S / Kurtz, R C / Maisonneuve, P / Trichopoulos, D / Polesel, J / Duell, E J / Boffetta, P / La Vecchia, C. ·Department of Epidemiology, IRCCS - Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Milan, Italy cristina.bosetti@marionegri.it. · Department of Epidemiology, IRCCS - Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Milan, Italy. · M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Medicine and Medical Genetics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA. · Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane, Australia. · Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State University, Penn State. · Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA. · University Health Network, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht (UMCU), Utrecht, The Netherlands Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc. · Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, CRO Aviano National Cancer Institute, IRCCS, Aviano. · Department of Preclinical and Clinical Pharmacology Mario Aiazzi Mancini, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy. · Regional Authority of Public Health in Banská Bystrica, Banská Bystrica, Slovakia. · Department of Epidemiology, IRCCS - Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Milan, Italy M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda Department of Health Sciences Research, Medicine and Medical Genetics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane, Australia Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State University, Penn State Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA University Health Network, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht (UMCU), Utrecht, The Netherlands Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, CRO Aviano National Cancer Institute, IRCCS, Aviano Department of Preclinical and Clinical Pharmacology Mario Aiazzi Mancini, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy Regional Authority of Public Health in Banská Bystrica, Banská Bystrica, Slovakia Public Health, Women · Public Health, Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide, SA, Australia. · Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Institute and MF MU, Brno, Czech Republic. · Louisiana State University School of Public Health, New Orleans, USA. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA. · Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA. · Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. · The Tisch Cancer Institute and Institute for Translational Epidemiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA. · Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #25057164.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes mellitus has been associated with an excess risk of pancreatic cancer, but the magnitude of the risk and the time-risk relationship are unclear, and there is limited information on the role of antidiabetic medications. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed individual-level data from 15 case-control studies within the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium, including 8305 cases and 13 987 controls. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) were estimated from multiple logistic regression models, adjusted for relevant covariates. RESULTS: Overall, 1155 (15%) cases and 1087 (8%) controls reported a diagnosis of diabetes 2 or more years before cancer diagnosis (or interview, for controls), corresponding to an OR of 1.90 (95% confidence interval, CI, 1.72-2.09). Consistent risk estimates were observed across strata of selected covariates, including body mass index and tobacco smoking. Pancreatic cancer risk decreased with duration of diabetes, but a significant excess risk was still evident 20 or more years after diabetes diagnosis (OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.03-1.63). Among diabetics, long duration of oral antidiabetic use was associated with a decreased pancreatic cancer risk (OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.14-0.69, for ≥15 years). Conversely, insulin use was associated with a pancreatic cancer risk in the short term (OR 5.60, 95% CI 3.75-8.35, for <5 years), but not for longer duration of use (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.53-1.70, for ≥15 years). CONCLUSION: This study provides the most definitive quantification to date of an excess risk of pancreatic cancer among diabetics. It also shows that a 30% excess risk persists for more than two decades after diabetes diagnosis, thus supporting a causal role of diabetes in pancreatic cancer. Oral antidiabetics may decrease the risk of pancreatic cancer, whereas insulin showed an inconsistent duration-risk relationship.

3 Article Ulcer, gastric surgery and pancreatic cancer risk: an analysis from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). 2013

Bosetti, C / Lucenteforte, E / Bracci, P M / Negri, E / Neale, R E / Risch, H A / Olson, S H / Gallinger, S / Miller, A B / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Talamini, R / Polesel, J / Ghadirian, P / Baghurst, P A / Zatonski, W / Fontham, E / Holly, E A / Gao, Y T / Yu, H / Kurtz, R C / Cotterchio, M / Maisonneuve, P / Zeegers, M P / Duell, E J / Boffetta, P / La Vecchia, C. ·Department of Epidemiology, IRCCS, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Milan. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #23970016.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Peptic ulcer and its treatments have been associated to pancreatic cancer risk, although the evidence is inconsistent. METHODS: We pooled 10 case-control studies within the Pancreatic Cancer Case-control Consortium (PanC4), including 4717 pancreatic cancer cases and 9374 controls, and estimated summary odds ratios (OR) using multivariable logistic regression models. RESULTS: The OR for pancreatic cancer was 1.10 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.98-1.23] for history of ulcer (OR = 1.08 for gastric and 0.97 for duodenal ulcer). The association was stronger for a diagnosis within 2 years before cancer diagnosis (OR = 2.43 for peptic, 1.75 for gastric, and 1.98 for duodenal ulcer). The OR was 1.53 (95% CI 1.15-2.03) for history of gastrectomy; however, the excess risk was limited to a gastrectomy within 2 years before cancer diagnosis (OR = 6.18, 95% CI 1.82-20.96), while no significant increased risk was observed for longer time since gastrectomy. No associations were observed for pharmacological treatments for ulcer, such as antacids, H2-receptor antagonists, or proton-pump inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS: This uniquely large collaborative study does not support the hypothesis that peptic ulcer and its treatment materially affect pancreatic cancer risk. The increased risk for short-term history of ulcer and gastrectomy suggests that any such association is due to increased cancer surveillance.

4 Article Cigarette smoking and pancreatic cancer: an analysis from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (Panc4). 2012

Bosetti, C / Lucenteforte, E / Silverman, D T / Petersen, G / Bracci, P M / Ji, B T / Negri, E / Li, D / Risch, H A / Olson, S H / Gallinger, S / Miller, A B / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Talamini, R / Polesel, J / Ghadirian, P / Baghurst, P A / Zatonski, W / Fontham, E / Bamlet, W R / Holly, E A / Bertuccio, P / Gao, Y T / Hassan, M / Yu, H / Kurtz, R C / Cotterchio, M / Su, J / Maisonneuve, P / Duell, E J / Boffetta, P / La Vecchia, C. ·Department of Epidemiology, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan, Italy. cristina.bosetti@marionegri.it ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #22104574.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To evaluate the dose-response relationship between cigarette smoking and pancreatic cancer and to examine the effects of temporal variables. METHODS: We analyzed data from 12 case-control studies within the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4), including 6507 pancreatic cases and 12 890 controls. We estimated summary odds ratios (ORs) by pooling study-specific ORs using random-effects models. RESULTS: Compared with never smokers, the OR was 1.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-1.3) for former smokers and 2.2 (95% CI 1.7-2.8) for current cigarette smokers, with a significant increasing trend in risk with increasing number of cigarettes among current smokers (OR=3.4 for ≥35 cigarettes per day, P for trend<0.0001). Risk increased in relation to duration of cigarette smoking up to 40 years of smoking (OR=2.4). No trend in risk was observed for age at starting cigarette smoking, whereas risk decreased with increasing time since cigarette cessation, the OR being 0.98 after 20 years. CONCLUSIONS: This uniquely large pooled analysis confirms that current cigarette smoking is associated with a twofold increased risk of pancreatic cancer and that the risk increases with the number of cigarettes smoked and duration of smoking. Risk of pancreatic cancer reaches the level of never smokers ∼20 years after quitting.

5 Article Alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis in the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). 2012

Lucenteforte, E / La Vecchia, C / Silverman, D / Petersen, G M / Bracci, P M / Ji, B T / Bosetti, C / Li, D / Gallinger, S / Miller, A B / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Talamini, R / Polesel, J / Ghadirian, P / Baghurst, P A / Zatonski, W / Fontham, E / Bamlet, W R / Holly, E A / Gao, Y T / Negri, E / Hassan, M / Cotterchio, M / Su, J / Maisonneuve, P / Boffetta, P / Duell, E J. ·Department of Epidemiology, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri Milan, Milan, Italy. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #21536662.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Heavy alcohol drinking has been related to pancreatic cancer, but the issue is still unsolved. METHODS: To evaluate the role of alcohol consumption in relation to pancreatic cancer, we conducted a pooled analysis of 10 case-control studies (5585 cases and 11,827 controls) participating in the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium. We computed pooled odds ratios (ORs) by estimating study-specific ORs adjusted for selected covariates and pooling them using random effects models. RESULTS: Compared with abstainers and occasional drinkers (< 1 drink per day), we observed no association for light-to-moderate alcohol consumption (≤ 4 drinks per day) and pancreatic cancer risk; however, associations were above unity for higher consumption levels (OR = 1.6, 95% confidence interval 1.2-2.2 for subjects drinking ≥ 9 drinks per day). Results did not change substantially when we evaluated associations by tobacco smoking status, or when we excluded participants who reported a history of pancreatitis, or participants whose data were based upon proxy responses. Further, no notable differences in pooled risk estimates emerged across strata of sex, age, race, study type, and study area. CONCLUSION: This collaborative-pooled analysis provides additional evidence for a positive association between heavy alcohol consumption and the risk of pancreatic cancer.

6 Article Cigar and pipe smoking, smokeless tobacco use and pancreatic cancer: an analysis from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). 2011

Bertuccio, P / La Vecchia, C / Silverman, D T / Petersen, G M / Bracci, P M / Negri, E / Li, D / Risch, H A / Olson, S H / Gallinger, S / Miller, A B / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Talamini, R / Polesel, J / Ghadirian, P / Baghurst, P A / Zatonski, W / Fontham, E T / Bamlet, W R / Holly, E A / Lucenteforte, E / Hassan, M / Yu, H / Kurtz, R C / Cotterchio, M / Su, J / Maisonneuve, P / Duell, E J / Bosetti, C / Boffetta, P. ·Department of Epidemiology, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan, Italy. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #21245160.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking is the best-characterized risk factor for pancreatic cancer. However, data are limited for other tobacco smoking products and smokeless tobacco. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a pooled analysis of cigar and pipe smoking and smokeless tobacco use and risk of pancreatic cancer using data from 11 case-control studies (6056 cases and 11,338 controls) within the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). Pooled odds ratios (OR) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by unconditional multiple logistic regression models adjusted for study center and selected covariates. RESULTS: Compared with never tobacco users, the OR for cigar-only smokers was 1.6 (95% CI: 1.2-2.3), i.e. comparable to that of cigarette-only smokers (OR 1.5; 95% CI 1.4-1.6). The OR was 1.1 (95% CI 0.69-1.6) for pipe-only smokers. There was some evidence of increasing risk with increasing amount of cigar smoked per day (OR 1.82 for ≥ 10 grams of tobacco), although not with duration. The OR for ever smokeless tobacco users as compared with never tobacco users was 0.98 (95% CI 0.75-1.3). CONCLUSION: This collaborative analysis provides evidence that cigar smoking is associated with an excess risk of pancreatic cancer, while no significant association emerged for pipe smoking and smokeless tobacco use.

7 Article Past medical history and pancreatic cancer risk: Results from a multicenter case-control study. 2010

Maisonneuve, Patrick / Lowenfels, Albert B / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Ghadirian, Parviz / Baghurst, Peter A / Zatonski, Witold A / Miller, Anthony B / Duell, Eric J / Boffetta, Paolo / Boyle, Peter. ·European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. ·Ann Epidemiol · Pubmed #20123159.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To investigate risk factors that may be linked to pancreatic cancer. METHODS: We designed a multicenter population-based case-control (823 cases, 1679 control patients) study with data collection by using a common protocol and questionnaire. Participating centers were located in Australia, Canada, the Netherlands, and Poland. RESULTS: After adjustment for confounding factors, a positive history of pancreatitis was associated with pancreatic cancer (odds ratio [OR], 4.68; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 2.23-9.84). The risk was especially high in heavy smokers (OR, 15.4; 95% CI, 3.18-74.9). Patients with diabetes had an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer (OR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.60-2.91). The risk was highest in the first year after the development of diabetes (OR, 6.68; 95% CI, 3.56-12.6) and decreased over time. A history of allergy was associated with a reduced risk of pancreas cancer (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.50-0.82). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with newly diagnosed diabetes and patients with pancreatitis, particularly in heavy smokers, have an increased risk for developing pancreatic cancer. In addition to being risk factors, these conditions could be early manifestations of underlying pancreatic cancer. A history of allergy decreases the risk of pancreatic cancer.