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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Shu-Lin Yu
Based on 5 articles published since 2010
(Why 5 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, S. L. Yu wrote the following 5 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Functions and clinical implications of exosomes in pancreatic cancer. 2019

Qian, Ling / Yu, Shulin / Chen, Zhen / Meng, Zhiqiang / Huang, Shenglin / Wang, Peng. ·Department of Integrative Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032, China; Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 2000332, China. · Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 2000332, China; Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 2000332, China. Electronic address: slhuang@fudan.edu.cn. · Department of Integrative Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032, China; Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 2000332, China. Electronic address: wangp413@163.com. ·Biochim Biophys Acta Rev Cancer · Pubmed #30419313.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human malignancies and is associated with a dismal prognosis, which can be contributed to its atypical symptoms, metastatic propensity, and significant chemoresistance. Emerging evidence shows that pancreatic cancer cell-derived exosomes (PEXs) play critical roles in tumorigenesis and tumor development, as they are involved in drug resistance, immune evasion and metabolic reprograming, and distant metastasis of pancreatic cancer. Their numerous differentially expressed and functional contents make PEXs promising screening tools and therapeutic targets, which require further exploration. In this review, we focus on the functions of PEX contents and their clinical implications in pancreatic cancer.

2 Article [Clinicopathological features and prognosis of 488 patients with neuroendocrine tumors]. 2019

Zhai, X J / Yu, S L / Ma, Y H / Wang, F / Yang, M J / Lian, Y J / Yu, X X / Fan, Q X / Song, L J. ·Department of Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, China. · Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, China. · Department of Pathology, First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, China. ·Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi · Pubmed #31484281.

ABSTRACT:

3 Article Plasma IFN-γ-inducible chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 correlate with survival and chemotherapeutic efficacy in advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2019

Qian, Ling / Yu, Shulin / Yin, Chengqian / Zhu, Bo / Chen, Zhen / Meng, Zhiqiang / Wang, Peng. ·Department of Integrative Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, 270 Dong An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China; Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 130 Dong An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. · Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Boston University School of Medicine, 72 East Concord Street, Boston, MA, 02118, USA. · Department of Integrative Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, 270 Dong An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China; Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 130 Dong An Road, Shanghai, 200032, China. Electronic address: wangp413@163.com. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #30685120.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Recent studies have suggested that the CXCL9, 10, 11/CXCR3 axis is significant in immune regulation and therapeutic efficacy in human cancers; however, its role in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains unknown. This study serves to evaluate the prognostic prediction value of plasma IFN-γ-inducible chemokines, CXCL9 and CXCL10, in advanced PDAC. METHODS: Two hundred patients with advanced PDAC receiving palliative chemotherapy were retrospectively recruited. The association between Plasma CXCL9/CXCL10 levels and survival time was first analyzed in a test group of 110 patients and then confirmed in a validation group of 90 patients. RESULTS: High levels of CXCL9 and CXCL10 were significantly correlated with longer overall survival (OS) in advanced PDAC patients (314 vs. 136 days for CXCL9, P < 0.0001, and 374 vs. 163 days for CXCL10, P < 0.0001, respectively) in the test group, which was consistent with the results derived from the validation group. In addition, high levels of CXCL9 and CXCL10 were associated with longer time to progression (TTP) in patients receiving chemotherapy (100 vs. 60 days for CXCL9, P = 0.0021, and 104 vs. 67 days for CXCL10, P = 0.0057, respectively). Multivariate analyses confirmed that CXCL9 and CXCL10 were independent prognostic predictors for OS (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.452, P < 0.001 for CXCL9; and HR: 0.586, P = 0.007 for CXCL10, respectively) and TTP (HR: 0.656, P = 0.015 for CXCL9; and HR: 0.687, P = 0.040 for CXCL10, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Plasma CXCL9 and CXCL10 can be used to predict survival of advanced PDAC patients receiving chemotherapy, allowing clinicians to potentially improve treatment outcomes by identifying candidates for aggressive therapy.

4 Article Serum lactate dehydrogenase predicts prognosis and correlates with systemic inflammatory response in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer after gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. 2017

Yu, Shu-Lin / Xu, Li-Tao / Qi, Qi / Geng, Ya-Wen / Chen, Hao / Meng, Zhi-Qiang / Wang, Peng / Chen, Zhen. ·Department of Integrative Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, 270 Dong An Road, Shanghai 200032, China. · Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 130 Dong An Road, Shanghai 200032, China. ·Sci Rep · Pubmed #28345594.

ABSTRACT: Serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) concentrations correlate with tumor progression and poor outcome. We evaluated the predictive value of serum LDH level for overall survival (OS) of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer after gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. We retrospectively enrolled 364 patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma who were then allocated to training (n = 139) and validation cohorts (n = 225). We evaluated the association between serum LDH levels and OS as well as with markers of systemic inflammation, including neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and lymphocyte/monocyte ratio (LMR). Kaplan-Meier analyses revealed that low serum LDH levels in the training cohort significantly correlated with longer OS. Multivariate analysis identified the serum LDH levels as an independent prognostic predictor of OS (p = 0.005). Serum LDH levels correlated positively with NLR and PLR and correlated negatively with LMR. Similar results were obtained for the validation cohort, except that multivariate analysis identified the serum LDH level as a significant prognostic predictor and only a statistical trend for OS (p = 0.059). We conclude that serum LDH levels were associated with the systemic inflammatory response and served as a significant prognostic predictor of OS. Serum LDH levels predicted OS in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer after gemcitabine-based palliative chemotherapy.

5 Article A novel systemic inflammation response index (SIRI) for predicting the survival of patients with pancreatic cancer after chemotherapy. 2016

Qi, Qi / Zhuang, Liping / Shen, Yehua / Geng, Yawen / Yu, Shulin / Chen, Hao / Liu, Luming / Meng, Zhiqiang / Wang, Peng / Chen, Zhen. ·Department of Integrative Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, China. · Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, China. ·Cancer · Pubmed #27152949.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Predicting survival is uniquely difficult in patients with pancreatic cancer who receive chemotherapy. The authors developed a systemic inflammation response index (SIRI) based on peripheral neutrophil, monocyte, and lymphocyte counts and evaluated the ability of the SIRI to predict the survival of patients with pancreatic cancer who received chemotherapy. METHODS: The SIRI was developed in a training set of 177 patients who had advanced pancreatic cancer and received palliative chemotherapy. The ability of the SIRI to predict a patient's survival after chemotherapy was validated in 2 independent cohorts (n = 397). RESULTS: Compared with patients who had an SIRI <1.8, patients in the training cohort who had an SIRI ≥1.8 had a shorter time to progression (TTP) (hazard ratio [HR], 2.348; 95% confidence interval, 1.559-3.535; P = .003) and shorter overall survival (OS) (HR, 2.789; 95% confidence interval, 1.897-4.121; P < .001). Comparable TTP and OS findings were observed in 2 independent validation cohorts. Multivariate analysis confirmed that the SIRI was an independent prognostic factor for both TTP and OS. In addition, compared with no change, an increase in the SIRI at week 8 was associated with poor TTP and OS, whereas a decrease in the SIRI was associated with improved outcomes. In addition, high SIRI scores were correlated with higher serum levels of interleukin 10, C-C motif chemokine ligand 17 (CCL17), CCL18, and CCL22 and with a shortened TTP. CONCLUSIONS: The SIRI can be used to predict the survival of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinomas who receive chemotherapy, potentially allowing clinicians to improve treatment outcomes by identifying candidates for aggressive therapy. Cancer 2016;122:2158-67. © 2016 American Cancer Society.