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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by H. Yu
Based on 5 articles published since 2010
(Why 5 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, H. Yu wrote the following 5 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Vitamin D and pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium. 2015

Waterhouse, M / Risch, H A / Bosetti, C / Anderson, K E / Petersen, G M / Bamlet, W R / Cotterchio, M / Cleary, S P / Ibiebele, T I / La Vecchia, C / Skinner, H G / Strayer, L / Bracci, P M / Maisonneuve, P / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Zaton Ski, W / Lu, L / Yu, H / Janik-Koncewicz, K / Polesel, J / Serraino, D / Neale, R E / Anonymous2000830. ·Division of Population Health, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston Centre for Research Excellence in Sun and Health, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Australia. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, IRCCS-Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Milan, Italy. · Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, USA. · Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Division of Population Health, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston. · Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. · Truven Health Analytics, Durham. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA. · Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Department of Epidemiology, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland. · Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, USA. · Division of Population Health, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston Centre for Research Excellence in Sun and Health, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Australia rachel.neale@qimrberghofer.edu.au. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #25977560.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The potential role of vitamin D in the aetiology of pancreatic cancer is unclear, with recent studies suggesting both positive and negative associations. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We used data from nine case-control studies from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4) to examine associations between pancreatic cancer risk and dietary vitamin D intake. Study-specific odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using multivariable logistic regression, and ORs were then pooled using a random-effects model. From a subset of four studies, we also calculated pooled estimates of association for supplementary and total vitamin D intake. RESULTS: Risk of pancreatic cancer increased with dietary intake of vitamin D [per 100 international units (IU)/day: OR = 1.13, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-1.19, P = 7.4 × 10(-6), P-heterogeneity = 0.52; ≥230 versus <110 IU/day: OR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.10-1.55, P = 2.4 × 10(-3), P-heterogeneity = 0.81], with the association possibly stronger in people with low retinol/vitamin A intake. CONCLUSION: Increased risk of pancreatic cancer was observed with higher levels of dietary vitamin D intake. Additional studies are required to determine whether or not our finding has a causal basis.

2 Article Ulcer, gastric surgery and pancreatic cancer risk: an analysis from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). 2013

Bosetti, C / Lucenteforte, E / Bracci, P M / Negri, E / Neale, R E / Risch, H A / Olson, S H / Gallinger, S / Miller, A B / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Talamini, R / Polesel, J / Ghadirian, P / Baghurst, P A / Zatonski, W / Fontham, E / Holly, E A / Gao, Y T / Yu, H / Kurtz, R C / Cotterchio, M / Maisonneuve, P / Zeegers, M P / Duell, E J / Boffetta, P / La Vecchia, C. ·Department of Epidemiology, IRCCS, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Milan. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #23970016.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Peptic ulcer and its treatments have been associated to pancreatic cancer risk, although the evidence is inconsistent. METHODS: We pooled 10 case-control studies within the Pancreatic Cancer Case-control Consortium (PanC4), including 4717 pancreatic cancer cases and 9374 controls, and estimated summary odds ratios (OR) using multivariable logistic regression models. RESULTS: The OR for pancreatic cancer was 1.10 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.98-1.23] for history of ulcer (OR = 1.08 for gastric and 0.97 for duodenal ulcer). The association was stronger for a diagnosis within 2 years before cancer diagnosis (OR = 2.43 for peptic, 1.75 for gastric, and 1.98 for duodenal ulcer). The OR was 1.53 (95% CI 1.15-2.03) for history of gastrectomy; however, the excess risk was limited to a gastrectomy within 2 years before cancer diagnosis (OR = 6.18, 95% CI 1.82-20.96), while no significant increased risk was observed for longer time since gastrectomy. No associations were observed for pharmacological treatments for ulcer, such as antacids, H2-receptor antagonists, or proton-pump inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS: This uniquely large collaborative study does not support the hypothesis that peptic ulcer and its treatment materially affect pancreatic cancer risk. The increased risk for short-term history of ulcer and gastrectomy suggests that any such association is due to increased cancer surveillance.

3 Article Pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer risk: a pooled analysis in the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). 2012

Duell, E J / Lucenteforte, E / Olson, S H / Bracci, P M / Li, D / Risch, H A / Silverman, D T / Ji, B T / Gallinger, S / Holly, E A / Fontham, E H / Maisonneuve, P / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Ghadirian, P / Kurtz, R C / Ludwig, E / Yu, H / Lowenfels, A B / Seminara, D / Petersen, G M / La Vecchia, C / Boffetta, P. ·Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. eduell@iconcologia.net ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #22767586.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatitis is a known risk factor for pancreatic cancer; however, an unknown fraction of the disease is thought to be a consequence of tumor-related duct obstruction. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A pooled analysis of a history of pancreatitis and risk of pancreatic cancer was carried out considering the time interval between diagnoses and potential modification by covariates. Adjusted pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated from 10 case-control studies (5048 cases of ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 10,947 controls) taking part in the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). RESULTS: The association between pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer was nearly three-fold at intervals of >2 years between diagnoses (OR: 2.71, 95% CI: 1.96-3.74) and much stronger at intervals of ≤2 years (OR: 13.56, 95% CI: 8.72-21.90) probably reflecting a combination of reverse causation and antecedent misdiagnosis of pancreas cancer as pancreatitis. The younger (<65 years) pancreatic cancer cases showed stronger associations with previous (>2 years) pancreatitis (OR: 3.91, 95% CI: 2.53-6.04) than the older (≥65 years) cases (OR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.02-2.76; P value for interaction: 0.006). CONCLUSIONS: Despite a moderately strong association between pancreatitis (diagnosed before >2 years) and pancreatic cancer, the population attributable fraction was estimated at 1.34% (95% CI: 0.612-2.07%), suggesting that a relatively small proportion of pancreatic cancer might be avoided if pancreatitis could be prevented.

4 Article Cigarette smoking and pancreatic cancer: an analysis from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (Panc4). 2012

Bosetti, C / Lucenteforte, E / Silverman, D T / Petersen, G / Bracci, P M / Ji, B T / Negri, E / Li, D / Risch, H A / Olson, S H / Gallinger, S / Miller, A B / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Talamini, R / Polesel, J / Ghadirian, P / Baghurst, P A / Zatonski, W / Fontham, E / Bamlet, W R / Holly, E A / Bertuccio, P / Gao, Y T / Hassan, M / Yu, H / Kurtz, R C / Cotterchio, M / Su, J / Maisonneuve, P / Duell, E J / Boffetta, P / La Vecchia, C. ·Department of Epidemiology, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan, Italy. cristina.bosetti@marionegri.it ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #22104574.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To evaluate the dose-response relationship between cigarette smoking and pancreatic cancer and to examine the effects of temporal variables. METHODS: We analyzed data from 12 case-control studies within the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4), including 6507 pancreatic cases and 12 890 controls. We estimated summary odds ratios (ORs) by pooling study-specific ORs using random-effects models. RESULTS: Compared with never smokers, the OR was 1.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-1.3) for former smokers and 2.2 (95% CI 1.7-2.8) for current cigarette smokers, with a significant increasing trend in risk with increasing number of cigarettes among current smokers (OR=3.4 for ≥35 cigarettes per day, P for trend<0.0001). Risk increased in relation to duration of cigarette smoking up to 40 years of smoking (OR=2.4). No trend in risk was observed for age at starting cigarette smoking, whereas risk decreased with increasing time since cigarette cessation, the OR being 0.98 after 20 years. CONCLUSIONS: This uniquely large pooled analysis confirms that current cigarette smoking is associated with a twofold increased risk of pancreatic cancer and that the risk increases with the number of cigarettes smoked and duration of smoking. Risk of pancreatic cancer reaches the level of never smokers ∼20 years after quitting.

5 Article Cigar and pipe smoking, smokeless tobacco use and pancreatic cancer: an analysis from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). 2011

Bertuccio, P / La Vecchia, C / Silverman, D T / Petersen, G M / Bracci, P M / Negri, E / Li, D / Risch, H A / Olson, S H / Gallinger, S / Miller, A B / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Talamini, R / Polesel, J / Ghadirian, P / Baghurst, P A / Zatonski, W / Fontham, E T / Bamlet, W R / Holly, E A / Lucenteforte, E / Hassan, M / Yu, H / Kurtz, R C / Cotterchio, M / Su, J / Maisonneuve, P / Duell, E J / Bosetti, C / Boffetta, P. ·Department of Epidemiology, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan, Italy. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #21245160.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking is the best-characterized risk factor for pancreatic cancer. However, data are limited for other tobacco smoking products and smokeless tobacco. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a pooled analysis of cigar and pipe smoking and smokeless tobacco use and risk of pancreatic cancer using data from 11 case-control studies (6056 cases and 11,338 controls) within the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). Pooled odds ratios (OR) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by unconditional multiple logistic regression models adjusted for study center and selected covariates. RESULTS: Compared with never tobacco users, the OR for cigar-only smokers was 1.6 (95% CI: 1.2-2.3), i.e. comparable to that of cigarette-only smokers (OR 1.5; 95% CI 1.4-1.6). The OR was 1.1 (95% CI 0.69-1.6) for pipe-only smokers. There was some evidence of increasing risk with increasing amount of cigar smoked per day (OR 1.82 for ≥ 10 grams of tobacco), although not with duration. The OR for ever smokeless tobacco users as compared with never tobacco users was 0.98 (95% CI 0.75-1.3). CONCLUSION: This collaborative analysis provides evidence that cigar smoking is associated with an excess risk of pancreatic cancer, while no significant association emerged for pipe smoking and smokeless tobacco use.