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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Shuji Yonehara
Based on 9 articles published since 2010
(Why 9 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Shuji Yonehara wrote the following 9 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Roles of ERCP in the Early Diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer. 2019

Hanada, Keiji / Minami, Tomoyuki / Shimizu, Akinori / Fukuhara, Motomitsu / Yano, Shigeki / Sasaki, Kenji / Koda, Masanori / Sugiyama, Kayo / Yonehara, Shuji / Yanagisawa, Akio. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Onomichi General Hospital, Onomichi 722-8508, Japan. kh-ajpbd@nifty.com. · Department of Gastroenterology, Onomichi General Hospital, Onomichi 722-8508, Japan. t.minami@beach.ocn.ne.jp. · Department of Gastroenterology, Onomichi General Hospital, Onomichi 722-8508, Japan. a.shimizu313@gmail.com. · Department of Gastroenterology, Onomichi General Hospital, Onomichi 722-8508, Japan. motomitsu.fukuhara@gmail.com. · Department of Gastroenterology, Onomichi General Hospital, Onomichi 722-8508, Japan. s.yano0319@gmail.com. · Department of Pathology, Onomichi General Hospital, Onomichi 722-8508, Japan. k_sasakijaonosou@yahoo.co.jp. · Department of Pathology, Onomichi General Hospital, Onomichi 722-8508, Japan. m_koudajaonosou@yahoo.co.jp. · Department of Pathology, Onomichi General Hospital, Onomichi 722-8508, Japan. ksugi70685@gmail.com. · Department of Pathology, Onomichi General Hospital, Onomichi 722-8508, Japan. yonehara@eos.ocn.ne.jp. · Department of Pathology, Kyoto First Red Cross Hospital, Kyoto 605-0981, Japan. yanagisa@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp. ·Diagnostics (Basel) · Pubmed #30866585.

ABSTRACT: It has been reported that endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is of value in evaluating precise pancreatograms of the pancreatic duct (PD). Recently, institutions have tended to perform magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) for the diagnosis of PD due to post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP). In small pancreatic cancer (PC), including PC in situ (PCIS) which is undetectable on cross sectional images, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) and MRCP serve important roles in detecting local irregular stenosis of the PD or small cystic lesions. Subsequently, ERCP and associated serial pancreatic juice aspiration cytologic examination (SPACE) obtained by endoscopic nasopancreatic drainage (ENPD) may be useful in the diagnosis of very early-stage PC. Further prospective multicenter studies are required to establish a standard method of SPACE for the early diagnosis of PC.

2 Review Diagnostic strategies for early pancreatic cancer. 2015

Hanada, Keiji / Okazaki, Akihito / Hirano, Naomichi / Izumi, Yoshihiro / Teraoka, Yuji / Ikemoto, Juri / Kanemitsu, Kozue / Hino, Fumiaki / Fukuda, Toshikatsu / Yonehara, Shuji. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Onomichi General Hospital, 1-10-23 Hirahara, Onomichi, 722-8508, Japan, kh-ajpbd@nifty.com. ·J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #25501287.

ABSTRACT: Diagnosis of pancreatic cancer (PC) at an early stage with curative surgery is the approach with the potential to significantly improve long-term patient outcome. Recently, some reports showed that patients with pancreatic tumors smaller than 10 mm showed a favorable prognosis. However, the rate of tumor detection on computed tomography in patients with small pancreatic tumors is low. For the diagnoses of PC with tumors smaller than 10 mm, the rate of tumor detection was higher on endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) than on computed tomography or other modalities, and histologic diagnosis using EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration was helpful in confirming the diagnosis. For the diagnosis of PC in situ, EUS and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography may play important roles in detecting the local irregular stenosis of the pancreatic duct. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography and sequential cytodiagnosis using pancreatic juice obtained by endoscopic nasopancreatic drainage multiple times was useful in the final diagnosis of PC in situ. At present, improving survival lies in identifying those individuals with high-risk factors or precursor lesions through an effective screening method. For example, these should include ultrasonography, various biological markers, or national familial pancreatic cancer registration. Additionally, the relationship between specialists in PC from medical centers and practicing physicians plays an important role in the early diagnosis of PC.

3 Article Prospective Follow-up Study of the Recurrence of Pancreatic Cancer Diagnosed at an Early Stage: The Value of Endoscopic Ultrasonography for Early Diagnosis of Recurrence in the Remnant Pancreas. 2018

Ikemoto, Juri / Hanada, Keiji / Minami, Tomoyuki / Okazaki, Akihito / Abe, Tomoyuki / Amano, Hironobu / Yonehara, Shuji. · ·Pancreas · Pubmed #29517631.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Most patients with pancreatic cancer (PC) demonstrate recurrences in the form of metastatic disease. We prospectively evaluated recurrence in PC cases diagnosed at an early stage. METHODS: Thirty cases of PC stage 0 or IA were prospectively followed for at least 1 year after initial surgery. We performed blood tests and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) every 3 to 6 months. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) was performed if CT revealed abnormal findings in the remnant pancreas (RP). RESULTS: The median follow-up period was 53.9 months. Pancreatic cancer recurred in the RP (n = 8) and liver (n = 1). Computed tomography revealed mass lesions in 5 cases, a cystic lesion in 2 cases, and pancreatic duct dilatation in 1 case. Endoscopic ultrasonography detected mass lesions in 3 cases without a detectable mass on CT. The sensitivity of EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration and pancreatic juice cytology was 75%. Five of 8 cases underwent total resection of the RP, with pathologic findings revealing stage IA in 1 case, stage II in 1 case, and stage III in 3 cases. CONCLUSIONS: Careful long-term follow-up including EUS should be performed in resected PC cases diagnosed at an early stage to check recurrence in the RP.

4 Article A case of mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma of the pancreas mimicking intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma. 2018

Mori, Hideki / Hanada, Keiji / Minami, Tomoyuki / Yano, Shigeki / Fukuhara, Motomitsu / Maruyama, Hirotsugu / Shimizu, Akinori / Hirano, Naomichi / Hino, Fumiaki / Amano, Hironobu / Yonehara, Shuji. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Onomichi General Hospital, 1-10-23, Hirahara, Onomichi, 722-8508, Japan. morihideki2012@gmail.com. · Department of Gastroenterology, Onomichi General Hospital, 1-10-23, Hirahara, Onomichi, 722-8508, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Onomichi General Hospital, 1-10-23, Hirahara, Onomichi, 722-8508, Japan. · Department of Pathology, Onomichi General Hospital, 1-10-23, Hirahara, Onomichi, 722-8508, Japan. ·Clin J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #29442219.

ABSTRACT: A previously healthy 52-year-old man was referred to our hospital for further evaluation of main pancreatic duct dilatation. The preoperative work-up was consistent with intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma (IPMC) derived from a mixed type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), because multilocular cysts with enhancing thickened pancreatic head walls and dilated pancreatic ducts lined with dysplastic mucinous epithelium, with papillary proliferation from the pancreatic body to the tail, were observed; in addition, the pancreatic juice cytology was class V, which is suggestive of adenocarcinoma. Total pancreatectomy was performed because a definite mass was not found before surgical resection and the tumors could have spread to the tail. The pathological diagnosis was mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma of the pancreatic head. IPMN with high- or low-grade dysplasia was not observed anywhere in the pancreatic duct. The pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma consisted of large caliber malignant glands with intraluminal flat or papillary structures; therefore, we were unable to recognize a definite pancreatic mass before surgical resection, and suspected an IPMC derived from a mixed type IPMN.

5 Article Visceral Adipose Tissue and Skeletal Muscle Index Distribution Predicts Severe Pancreatic Fistula Development After Pancreaticoduodenectomy. 2018

Yamane, Hiroaki / Abe, Tomoyuki / Amano, Hironobu / Hanada, Keiji / Minami, Tomoyuki / Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi / Fukuda, Toshikatsu / Yonehara, Shuji / Nakahara, Masahiro / Ohdan, Hideki / Noriyuki, Toshio. ·Department of Surgery, Onomichi General Hospital, Onomichi, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Onomichi General Hospital, Onomichi, Japan t.abe.hiroshima@gmail.com. · Department of Gastroenterological and Transplant Surgery, Applied Life Sciences, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Onomichi General Hospital, Onomichi, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Hiroshima General Hospital of West Japan Railway Company, Hiroshima, Japan. · Department of Pathology, Onomichi General Hospital, Onomichi, Japan. ·Anticancer Res · Pubmed #29374741.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND/AIM: In this study, we investigated the effect of body composition on pancreatic fistula (PF) development after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). MATERIALS AND METHODS: All consecutive patients with pancreatic and extrahepatic biliary malignancy following PD who were treated between 2006 and 2016 were enrolled. RESULTS: PF developed in 30.3% of cases (30/99 patients), including a grade B PF in 25.3% of cases (25/99 patients) and a grade C PF in 5.1% of cases (5/99 patients). Univariate analysis identified that body mass index ≥25 kg/m CONCLUSION: Elevated VATA/SMI was the only preoperative key factor for PF after PD.

6 Article Perioperative Red Blood Cell Transfusion Is Associated with Poor Long-term Survival in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma. 2017

Abe, Tomoyuki / Amano, Hironobu / Hanada, Keiji / Minami, Tomoyuki / Yonehara, Shuji / Hattori, Minoru / Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi / Fukuda, Toshikatsu / Nakahara, Masahiro / Ohdan, Hideki / Noriyuki, Toshio. ·Department of Surgery, Onomichi General Hospital, Onomichi, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Onomichi General Hospital, Onomichi, Japan amanojack@star.odn.ne.jp. · Department of Gastroenterological and Transplant Surgery, Applied Life Sciences, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Onomichi General Hospital, Onomichi, Japan. · Department of Pathology, Onomichi General Hospital, Onomichi, Japan. · Advanced Medical Skill Training Center, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Medical Corporation Japan Railway Hiroshima Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan. ·Anticancer Res · Pubmed #28982913.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND/AIM: Perioperative red blood cell transfusion (RBCT) can negatively affect the host's immune system. We investigated the effects of perioperative RBCT on long-term survival among patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated 148 patients with PDAC who underwent surgery with curative intent (33 who received RBCTs and 115 who did not). Significant prognostic variables on univariate analysis were subjected to multivariate analyses using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. RESULTS: Both groups exhibited significant differences in age, preoperative haemoglobin levels, carbohydrate antigen 19-9 levels, maximum tumour size, tumour staging, operative time, intraoperative blood loss, major vascular resection, and the proportion of pancreaticoduodenectomies performed. Patients who underwent RBCTs exhibited significantly poorer overall survival (p<0.001) and recurrence-free survival (p<0.001) compared to patients who did not. CONCLUSION: Perioperative RBCT was associated with poorer long-term survival among patients with PDAC who underwent surgery with curative intent.

7 Article Genetic analyses of isolated high-grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HG-PanIN) reveal paucity of alterations in TP53 and SMAD4. 2017

Hosoda, Waki / Chianchiano, Peter / Griffin, James F / Pittman, Meredith E / Brosens, Lodewijk Aa / Noë, Michaël / Yu, Jun / Shindo, Koji / Suenaga, Masaya / Rezaee, Neda / Yonescu, Raluca / Ning, Yi / Albores-Saavedra, Jorge / Yoshizawa, Naohiko / Harada, Kenichi / Yoshizawa, Akihiko / Hanada, Keiji / Yonehara, Shuji / Shimizu, Michio / Uehara, Takeshi / Samra, Jaswinder S / Gill, Anthony J / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Goggins, Michael G / Hruban, Ralph H / Wood, Laura D. ·Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Pathology, Medica Sur Clinic and Foundation, Mexico City, Mexico. · The First Department of Internal Medicine, Mie University School of Medicine, Tsu, Japan. · Department of Human Pathology, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kanazawa, Japan. · Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto, Japan. · Center for Gastroendoscopy, Onomichi General Hospital, Onomichi, Japan. · Department of Pathology, Onomichi General Hospital, Onomich, Japan. · Diagnostic Pathology Center, Hakujikai Memorial Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto, Japan. · Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital and Discipline of Surgery, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · Cancer Diagnosis and Pathology Group, Kolling Institute of Medical Research Royal North Shore Hospital and University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Oncology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Medicine, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·J Pathol · Pubmed #28188630.

ABSTRACT: High-grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HG-PanIN) is the major precursor of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and is an ideal target for early detection. To characterize pure HG-PanIN, we analysed 23 isolated HG-PanIN lesions occurring in the absence of PDAC. Whole-exome sequencing of five of these HG-PanIN lesions revealed a median of 33 somatic mutations per lesion, with a total of 318 mutated genes. Targeted next-generation sequencing of 17 HG-PanIN lesions identified KRAS mutations in 94% of the lesions. CDKN2A alterations occurred in six HG-PanIN lesions, and RNF43 alterations in five. Mutations in TP53, GNAS, ARID1A, PIK3CA, and TGFBR2 were limited to one or two HG-PanINs. No non-synonymous mutations in SMAD4 were detected. Immunohistochemistry for p53 and SMAD4 proteins in 18 HG-PanINs confirmed the paucity of alterations in these genes, with aberrant p53 labelling noted only in three lesions, two of which were found to be wild type in sequencing analyses. Sixteen adjacent LG-PanIN lesions from ten patients were also sequenced using targeted sequencing. LG-PanIN harboured KRAS mutations in 94% of the lesions; mutations in CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4 were not identified. These results suggest that inactivation of TP53 and SMAD4 are late genetic alterations, predominantly occurring in invasive PDAC. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

8 Article A case report on metastatic pancreatic tumor from pulmonary adenocarcinoma that difficult to differentiate from primary pancreatic ductal carcinoma. 2016

Takei, Daisuke / Okazaki, Akihito / Minami, Tomoyuki / Ikemoto, Juri / Hirano, Naomichi / Hanada, Keiji / Teraoka, Yuji / Fukuda, Toshikatsu / Yonehara, Shuji. ·Department of Surgery, Onomichi General Hospital. ·Nihon Shokakibyo Gakkai Zasshi · Pubmed #27498937.

ABSTRACT: A woman was admitted to our department for lung adenocarcinoma and she was treated with left upper lobectomy. The carcinoembryonic antigen level had increased. Enhanced computed tomography showed a hypovascular tumor in the pancreatic tail and in the extension of the distal main pancreatic duct. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) clearly showed a low echoic lesion, and histological examination revealed adenocarcinoma. On immunostaining, the lesion was diagnosed as metastatic adenocarcinoma of the lungs. The patient was treated with chemotherapy for lung cancer and survived for 4 years after diagnosis. Differentiating a metastatic lesion to the pancreas from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is very important. Accurate diagnosis enables administration of appropriate treatment. In this case, EUS was especially useful for assessing the tumor in the pancreas. When patients with a history of extra-pancreatic cancer present with a pancreatic lesion, pancreatic metastases should be considered, regardless of the time elapsed since occurrence of the primary cancer. EUS-fine needle aspiration (FNA) with histological examination is the best method for definitive diagnosis of pancreatic disease in this group of patients. This approach has very high sensitivity and accuracy for the diagnosis of pancreatic metastases.

9 Article Value of cytodiagnosis using endoscopic nasopancreatic drainage for early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer: establishing a new method for the early detection of pancreatic carcinoma in situ. 2012

Iiboshi, Tomohiro / Hanada, Keiji / Fukuda, Toshikatsu / Yonehara, Shuji / Sasaki, Tamito / Chayama, Kazuaki. ·Department of Gastroenterology, JA Onomichi General Hospital, Onomichi, Japan. e-boshi@hotmail.co.jp ·Pancreas · Pubmed #22504379.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: We examined the results of pancreatic juice cytodiagnosis using the method of endoscopic nasopancreatic drainage (ENPD) to identify pancreatic carcinoma in situ and compared the images and pathologic diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma in situ as well as clinicopathologic characteristics. METHODS: In patients who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and had ENPD place, only patients presenting with focal stenosis and distal dilatation of the main pancreatic duct were included in the ENPD placement group. Endoscopic nasopancreatic drainage was conducted 27 times in 20 patients in the ENPD placement group. In an average session, cytodiagnosis of the pancreatic juice was conducted 5.3 times (range, 2-11 times). RESULTS: Results of cytodiagnosis were positive in 15 of 20 patients. Results of ENPD cytodiagnosis and diagnosis of pancreatic cancer showed sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 83.3%, and accuracy of 95%. Seven of 15 patients were diagnosed with carcinoma in situ. In these 7 patients, tumor markers (carcinoembryonic antigen, CA-19-9) were within reference limits, and the tumors were not visible on imaging tests. Pathologic histology revealed a propensity for the cancer to proliferate around the stenosis of the pancreatic duct. CONCLUSIONS: Cytodiagnosis of pancreatic juice using ENPD multiple times proved to be useful in the diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma in situ.