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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by W. Ye
Based on 8 articles published since 2009
(Why 8 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, W. Ye wrote the following 8 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Circulating plasma phospholipid fatty acids and risk of pancreatic cancer in a large European cohort. 2018

Matejcic, M / Lesueur, F / Biessy, C / Renault, A L / Mebirouk, N / Yammine, S / Keski-Rahkonen, P / Li, K / Hémon, B / Weiderpass, E / Rebours, V / Boutron-Ruault, M C / Carbonnel, F / Kaaks, R / Katzke, V / Kuhn, T / Boeing, H / Trichopoulou, A / Palli, D / Agnoli, C / Panico, S / Tumino, R / Sacerdote, C / Quirós, J R / Duell, E J / Porta, M / Sánchez, M J / Chirlaque, M D / Barricarte, A / Amiano, P / Ye, W / Peeters, P H / Khaw, K T / Perez-Cornago, A / Key, T J / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Riboli, E / Vineis, P / Romieu, I / Gunter, M J / Chajès, V. ·International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. · Genetic Epidemiology of Cancer team, Inserm, U900, Paris, France. · Institut Curie, Paris, France. · PSL University, Paris, France. · Mines ParisTech, Fontainebleau, France. · Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø - The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-Based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway. · Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, BioDonostia Research institute, San Sebastian, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology and Pancreatology, Beaujon Hospital, University Paris 7, Clichy, France. · INSERM, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Health across Generations Team, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France. · Université Paris Sud, UMRS, Villejuif, France. · Department of Gastroenterology, Bicêtre University Hospital, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke (DIfE), Nuthetal, Germany. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece. · Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute - ISPO, Florence, Italy. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Clinical Medicine and Surgery Department, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy. · Cancer Registry and Histopathology Department, ASP, "Civic - M.P. Arezzo" Hospital, Ragusa, Italy. · Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, Citta' della Salute e della Scienza Hospital, University of Turin and Centre for Cancer Prevention (CPO), Turin, Italy. · EPIC Asturias, Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. · Hospital del Mar Research Institute - IMIM, CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP) and Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública. Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA. Hospitales Universitarios de Granada/Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain. · CIBER in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology, Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain. · Department of Health and Social Sciences, Universidad de Murcia, Murcia, Spain. · Navarra Institute for Health Research (IdiSNA), Pamplona, Spain. · Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · The Medical Biobank at Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. · University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · MRC-PHE Center for Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #30110135.

ABSTRACT: There are both limited and conflicting data on the role of dietary fat and specific fatty acids in the development of pancreatic cancer. In this study, we investigated the association between plasma phospholipid fatty acids and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. The fatty acid composition was measured by gas chromatography in plasma samples collected at recruitment from375 incident pancreatic cancer cases and375 matched controls. Associations of specific fatty acids with pancreatic cancer risk were evaluated using multivariable conditional logistic regression models with adjustment for established pancreatic cancer risk factors. Statistically significant inverse associations were found between pancreatic cancer incidence and levels of heptadecanoic acid (OR

2 Article Risk of pancreatic cancer associated with family history of cancer and other medical conditions by accounting for smoking among relatives. 2018

Molina-Montes, E / Gomez-Rubio, P / Márquez, M / Rava, M / Löhr, M / Michalski, C W / Molero, X / Farré, A / Perea, J / Greenhalf, W / Ilzarbe, L / O'Rorke, M / Tardón, A / Gress, T / Barberà, V M / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, T / Domínguez-Muñoz, E / Muñoz-Bellvís, L / Balsells, J / Costello, E / Huang, J / Iglesias, M / Kleeff, J / Kong, Bo / Mora, J / Murray, L / O'Driscoll, D / Poves, I / Scarpa, A / Ye, W / Hidalgo, M / Sharp, L / Carrato, A / Real, F X / Malats, N / Anonymous601079. ·Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Madrid, and CIBERONC, Spain. · Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, Gastrocentrum, Stockholm, Sweden. · Technical University of Munich, Department of Surgery, Munich, Germany. · University of Heidelberg, Department of Surgery, Heidelberg, Germany. · Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, and CIBEREHD, Spain. · Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Department of Gastroenterology, Barcelona, Spain. · University Hospital 12 de Octubre, Department of Surgery, Madrid, Spain. · Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Liverpool, UK. · Hospital del Mar-Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona, Spain. · Queen's University Belfast, Centre for Public Health, Belfast, UK. · Instituto Universitario de Oncología del Principado de Asturias, Department of Medicine, Oviedo, and CIBERESP, Spain. · University Hospital of Giessen and Marburg, Department of Gastroenterology, Marburg, Germany. · General University Hospital of Elche, Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Elche, Spain. · Barts Cancer Institute, Centre for Molecular Oncology, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. · University Clinical Hospital of Santiago de Compostela, Department of Gastroenterology, Santiago de Compostela, Spain. · Salamanca University Hospital, General and Digestive Surgery Department, Salamanca, Spain. · Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Visceral, Vascular and Endocrine Surgery, Halle (Saale), Germany. · National Cancer Registry Ireland and HRB Clinical Research Facility, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland. · ARC-Net Centre for Applied Research on Cancer and Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Madrid-Norte-Sanchinarro Hospital, Madrid, Spain. · Newcastle University, Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Ramón y Cajal University Hospital, Department of Oncology, IRYCIS, Alcala University, Madrid, and CIBERONC, Spain. · Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, Madrid, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Barcelona, and CIBERONC, Spain. ·Int J Epidemiol · Pubmed #29329392.

ABSTRACT: Background: Family history (FH) of pancreatic cancer (PC) has been associated with an increased risk of PC, but little is known regarding the role of inherited/environmental factors or that of FH of other comorbidities in PC risk. We aimed to address these issues using multiple methodological approaches. Methods: Case-control study including 1431 PC cases and 1090 controls and a reconstructed-cohort study (N = 16 747) made up of their first-degree relatives (FDR). Logistic regression was used to evaluate PC risk associated with FH of cancer, diabetes, allergies, asthma, cystic fibrosis and chronic pancreatitis by relative type and number of affected relatives, by smoking status and other potential effect modifiers, and by tumour stage and location. Familial aggregation of cancer was assessed within the cohort using Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: FH of PC was associated with an increased PC risk [odds ratio (OR) = 2.68; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.27-4.06] when compared with cancer-free FH, the risk being greater when ≥ 2 FDRs suffered PC (OR = 3.88; 95% CI: 2.96-9.73) and among current smokers (OR = 3.16; 95% CI: 2.56-5.78, interaction FHPC*smoking P-value = 0.04). PC cumulative risk by age 75 was 2.2% among FDRs of cases and 0.7% in those of controls [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.42; 95% CI: 2.16-2.71]. PC risk was significantly associated with FH of cancer (OR = 1.30; 95% CI: 1.13-1.54) and diabetes (OR = 1.24; 95% CI: 1.01-1.52), but not with FH of other diseases. Conclusions: The concordant findings using both approaches strengthen the notion that FH of cancer, PC or diabetes confers a higher PC risk. Smoking notably increases PC risk associated with FH of PC. Further evaluation of these associations should be undertaken to guide PC prevention strategies.

3 Article Risk of pancreatic cancer among individuals with hepatitis C or hepatitis B virus infection: a nationwide study in Sweden. 2013

Huang, J / Magnusson, M / Törner, A / Ye, W / Duberg, A-S. ·Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #24178755.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A few studies indicated that hepatitis C and hepatitis B virus (HCV/HBV) might be associated with pancreatic cancer risk. The aim of this nationwide cohort study was to examine this possible association. METHODS: Hepatitis C virus- and hepatitis B virus-infected individuals were identified from the national surveillance database from 1990 to 2006, and followed to the end of 2008. The pancreatic cancer risk in the study population was compared with the general population by calculation of Standardized Incidence Ratios (SIRs), and with a matched reference population using a Cox proportional hazards regression model to calculate hazard ratios (HRs). RESULTS: In total 340 819 person-years in the HCV cohort and 102 295 in the HBV cohort were accumulated, with 34 and 5 pancreatic cancers identified, respectively. The SIRHCV was 2.1 (95% confidence interval, CI: 1.4, 2.9) and the SIRHBV was 1.4 (0.5, 3.3). In the Cox model analysis, the HR for HCV infection was 1.9 (95% CI: 1.3, 2.7), diminishing to 1.6 (1.04, 2.4) after adjustment for potential confounders. CONCLUSION: Our results indicated that HCV infection might be associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer but further studies are needed to verify such association. The results in the HBV cohort indicated an excess risk, however, without statistical significance due to lack of power.

4 Article Dietary intake of acrylamide and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. 2013

Obón-Santacana, M / Slimani, N / Lujan-Barroso, L / Travier, N / Hallmans, G / Freisling, H / Ferrari, P / Boutron-Ruault, M C / Racine, A / Clavel, F / Saieva, C / Pala, V / Tumino, R / Mattiello, A / Vineis, P / Argüelles, M / Ardanaz, E / Amiano, P / Navarro, C / Sánchez, M J / Molina Montes, E / Key, T / Khaw, K-T / Wareham, N / Peeters, P H / Trichopoulou, A / Bamia, C / Trichopoulos, D / Boeing, H / Kaaks, R / Katzke, V / Ye, W / Sund, M / Ericson, U / Wirfält, E / Overvad, K / Tjønneland, A / Olsen, A / Skeie, G / Åsli, L A / Weiderpass, E / Riboli, E / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Duell, E J. ·Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #23857962.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In 1994, acrylamide (AA) was classified as a probable human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. In 2002, AA was discovered at relatively high concentrations in some starchy, plant-based foods cooked at high temperatures. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A prospective analysis was conducted to evaluate the association between the dietary intake of AA and ductal adenocarcinoma of the exocrine pancreatic cancer (PC) risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort using Cox regression modeling. EPIC includes >500,000 men and women aged 35-75 at enrollment from 10 European countries. AA intake was estimated for each participant by combining questionnaire-based food consumption data with a harmonized AA database derived from the EU monitoring database of AA levels in foods, and evaluated in quintiles and continuously. RESULTS: After a mean follow-up of 11 years, 865 first incident adenocarcinomas of the exocrine pancreas were observed and included in the present analysis. At baseline, the mean dietary AA intake in EPIC was 26.22 µg/day. No overall association was found between continuous or quintiles of dietary AA intake and PC risk in EPIC (HR:0.95, 95%CI:0.89-1.01 per 10 µg/day). There was no effect measure modification by smoking status, sex, diabetes, alcohol intake or geographic region. However, there was an inverse association (HR: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.61-0.88 per 10 µg/day) between AA intake and PC risk in obese persons as defined using the body mass index (BMI, ≥ 30 kg/m(2)), but not when body fatness was defined using waist and hip circumference or their ratio. CONCLUSIONS: Dietary intake of AA was not associated with an increased risk of PC in the EPIC cohort.

5 Article Inflammation marker and risk of pancreatic cancer: a nested case-control study within the EPIC cohort. 2012

Grote, V A / Kaaks, R / Nieters, A / Tjønneland, A / Halkjær, J / Overvad, K / Skjelbo Nielsen, M R / Boutron-Ruault, M C / Clavel-Chapelon, F / Racine, A / Teucher, B / Becker, S / Pischon, T / Boeing, H / Trichopoulou, A / Cassapa, C / Stratigakou, V / Palli, D / Krogh, V / Tumino, R / Vineis, P / Panico, S / Rodríguez, L / Duell, E J / Sánchez, M-J / Dorronsoro, M / Navarro, C / Gurrea, A B / Siersema, P D / Peeters, P H M / Ye, W / Sund, M / Lindkvist, B / Johansen, D / Khaw, K-T / Wareham, N / Allen, N E / Travis, R C / Fedirko, V / Jenab, M / Michaud, D S / Chuang, S-C / Romaguera, D / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Rohrmann, S. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology (c020), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 581, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #22617158.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Established risk factors for pancreatic cancer include smoking, long-standing diabetes, high body fatness, and chronic pancreatitis, all of which can be characterised by aspects of inflammatory processes. However, prospective studies investigating the relation between inflammatory markers and pancreatic cancer risk are scarce. METHODS: We conducted a nested case-control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, measuring prediagnostic blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and soluble receptors of tumour necrosis factor-α (sTNF-R1, R2) in 455 pancreatic cancer cases and 455 matched controls. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using conditional logistic regression models. RESULTS: None of the inflammatory markers were significantly associated with risk of pancreatic cancer overall, although a borderline significant association was observed for higher circulating sTNF-R2 (crude OR=1.52 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.97-2.39), highest vs lowest quartile). In women, however, higher sTNF-R1 levels were significantly associated with risk of pancreatic cancer (crude OR=1.97 (95% CI 1.02-3.79)). For sTNF-R2, risk associations seemed to be stronger for diabetic individuals and those with a higher BMI. CONCLUSION: Prospectively, CRP and IL-6 do not seem to have a role in our study with respect to risk of pancreatic cancer, whereas sTNF-R1 seemed to be a risk factor in women and sTNF-R2 might be a mediator in the risk relationship between overweight and diabetes with pancreatic cancer. Further large prospective studies are needed to clarify the role of proinflammatory proteins and cytokines in the pathogenesis of exocrine pancreatic cancer.

6 Article Concentrations of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. 2012

Rohrmann, S / Grote, V A / Becker, S / Rinaldi, S / Tjønneland, A / Roswall, N / Grønbæk, H / Overvad, K / Boutron-Ruault, M C / Clavel-Chapelon, F / Racine, A / Teucher, B / Boeing, H / Drogan, D / Dilis, V / Lagiou, P / Trichopoulou, A / Palli, D / Tagliabue, G / Tumino, R / Vineis, P / Mattiello, A / Rodríguez, L / Duell, E J / Molina-Montes, E / Dorronsoro, M / Huerta, J-M / Ardanaz, E / Jeurnink, S / Peeters, P H M / Lindkvist, B / Johansen, D / Sund, M / Ye, W / Khaw, K-T / Wareham, N J / Allen, N E / Crowe, F L / Fedirko, V / Jenab, M / Michaud, D S / Norat, T / Riboli, E / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Kaaks, R. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention, Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Zurich, Hirschengraben 84, Zürich 8001, Switzerland. sabine.rohrmann@ifspm.uzh.ch ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #22315049.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their binding proteins (BPs) regulate cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis, and may have a role in the aetiology of various cancers. Information on their role in pancreatic cancer is limited and was examined here in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. METHODS: Serum concentrations of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in 422 cases and 422 controls matched on age, sex, study centre, recruitment date, and time since last meal. Conditional logistic regression was used to compute odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for confounding variables. RESULTS: Neither circulating levels of IGF-I (OR=1.21, 95% CI 0.75-1.93 for top vs bottom quartile, P-trend 0.301), IGFBP-3 (OR=1.00, 95% CI 0.66-1.51, P-trend 0.79), nor the molar IGF-I/IGFBP-3 ratio, an indicator of free IGF-I level (OR=1.22, 95% CI 0.75-1.97, P-trend 0.27), were statistically significantly associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer. In a cross-classification, however, a high concentration of IGF-I with concurrently low levels of IGFBP-3 was related to an increased risk of pancreatic cancer (OR=1.72, 95% CI 1.05-2.83; P-interaction=0.154). CONCLUSION: On the basis of these results, circulating levels of components of the IGF axis do not appear to be the risk factors for pancreatic cancer. However, on the basis of the results of a subanalysis, it cannot be excluded that a relatively large amount of IGF-1 together with very low levels of IGFBP-3 might still be associated with an increase in pancreatic cancer risk.

7 Article Diabetes mellitus, glycated haemoglobin and C-peptide levels in relation to pancreatic cancer risk: a study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. 2011

Grote, V A / Rohrmann, S / Nieters, A / Dossus, L / Tjønneland, A / Halkjær, J / Overvad, K / Fagherazzi, G / Boutron-Ruault, M C / Morois, S / Teucher, B / Becker, S / Sluik, D / Boeing, H / Trichopoulou, A / Lagiou, P / Trichopoulos, D / Palli, D / Pala, V / Tumino, R / Vineis, P / Panico, S / Rodríguez, L / Duell, E J / Molina-Montes, E / Dorronsoro, M / Huerta, J M / Ardanaz, E / Jeurnink, S M / Beulens, J W J / Peeters, P H M / Sund, M / Ye, W / Lindkvist, B / Johansen, D / Khaw, K T / Wareham, N / Allen, N / Crowe, F / Jenab, M / Romieu, I / Michaud, D S / Riboli, E / Romaguera, D / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Kaaks, R. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology c020, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 581, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. ·Diabetologia · Pubmed #21953276.

ABSTRACT: AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: There has been long-standing debate about whether diabetes is a causal risk factor for pancreatic cancer or a consequence of tumour development. Prospective epidemiological studies have shown variable relationships between pancreatic cancer risk and blood markers of glucose and insulin metabolism, overall and as a function of lag times between marker measurements (blood donation) and date of tumour diagnosis. METHODS: Pre-diagnostic levels of HbA(1c) and C-peptide were measured for 466 participants with pancreatic cancer and 466 individually matched controls within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate ORs for pancreatic cancer. RESULTS: Pancreatic cancer risk gradually increased with increasing pre-diagnostic HbA(1c) levels up to an OR of 2.42 (95% CI 1.33, 4.39 highest [≥ 6.5%, 48 mmol/mol] vs lowest [≤ 5.4%, 36 mmol/mol] category), even for individuals with HbA(1c) levels within the non-diabetic range. C-peptide levels showed no significant relationship with pancreatic cancer risk, irrespective of fasting status. Analyses showed no clear trends towards increasing hyperglycaemia (as marked by HbA(1c) levels) or reduced pancreatic beta cell responsiveness (as marked by C-peptide levels) with decreasing time intervals from blood donation to cancer diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Our data on HbA(1c) show that individuals who develop exocrine pancreatic cancer tend to have moderate increases in HbA(1c) levels, relatively independently of obesity and insulin resistance-the classic and major risk factors for type 2 diabetes. While there is no strong difference by lag time, more data are needed on this in order to reach a firm conclusion.

8 Minor Are cohort data on smokeless tobacco use and pancreatic cancer confounded by alcohol use? 2011

Nyrén, O / Lambe, M / Ye, W / Adami, H O. · ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #21690234.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --