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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Hideo Yasunaga
Based on 3 articles published since 2010
(Why 3 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, H. Yasunaga wrote the following 3 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Progression-free survival as a surrogate for overall survival in first-line chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer. 2016

Hamada, Tsuyoshi / Nakai, Yousuke / Isayama, Hiroyuki / Yasunaga, Hideo / Matsui, Hiroki / Takahara, Naminatsu / Mizuno, Suguru / Kogure, Hirofumi / Matsubara, Saburo / Yamamoto, Natsuyo / Tada, Minoru / Koike, Kazuhiko. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Electronic address: hamada-tky@umin.ac.jp. · Department of Gastroenterology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: ynakai-tky@umin.ac.jp. · Department of Gastroenterology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: isayama-tky@umin.ac.jp. · Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Health Economics, School of Public Health, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: yasunagah-tky@umin.ac.jp. · Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Health Economics, School of Public Health, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: ptmatsui-tky@umin.ac.jp. · Department of Gastroenterology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: naminatsu.takahara@gmail.com. · Department of Gastroenterology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: smizuno-tky@umin.ac.jp. · Department of Gastroenterology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: kogureh-tky@umin.ac.jp. · Department of Gastroenterology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: sab-tky@umin.net. · Department of Gastroenterology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: natsuyoy-gi@umin.ac.jp. · Department of Gastroenterology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: mtada-tky@umin.ac.jp. · Department of Gastroenterology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: kkoike-tky@umin.ac.jp. ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #27451020.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Overall survival (OS), as the primary end-point in first-line chemotherapy trials, requires a prolonged follow-up time and may be confounded by subsequent regimens. This study aimed to evaluate the correlation between OS and surrogate end-points (progression-free survival [PFS], response rate and disease control rate), and to identify a potential surrogate for OS in advanced pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Based on an electronic search, we identified randomized controlled phase II and III trials of first-line chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer. Correlation analyses were performed between surrogate end-points and OS, and between improvements in surrogates and those in OS. RESULTS: Fifty trials (II/II-III/III, 17/2/31) with 111 treatment arms were identified, and 15,906 patients were analysed. PFS was most strongly correlated with OS (correlation coefficient, 0.76). Weighted linear regression models revealed the greatest determinant coefficient of 0.84 between the hazard ratio (HR) of the experimental arms compared with the control arms of PFS and that of OS. The approximate equation was log HROS = 0.01 + 0.77 × log HRPFS, indicating that risk reduction of OS via chemotherapy would translate into a 77% risk reduction of PFS. The surrogacy of PFS for OS was robust throughout our subgroup analyses: e.g., biologic versus non-biologic regimens, locally advanced versus metastatic disease. CONCLUSIONS: The surrogacy of PFS for OS in pancreatic cancer was validated. Therefore, the use of PFS as the primary end-point in clinical trials could facilitate the early introduction of new effective chemotherapy regimens into clinical practice.

2 Article Severe bleeding and perforation are rare complications of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration for pancreatic masses: an analysis of 3,090 patients from 212 hospitals. 2014

Hamada, Tsuyoshi / Yasunaga, Hideo / Nakai, Yousuke / Isayama, Hiroyuki / Horiguchi, Hiromasa / Matsuda, Shinya / Fushimi, Kiyohide / Koike, Kazuhiko. ·Department of Gastroenterology, The University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Health Economics and Epidemiology Research, The University of Tokyo School of Public Health, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Clinical Data Management and Research, Clinical Research Center, National Hospital Organization Headquarters, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Health Care Informatics, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan. ·Gut Liver · Pubmed #24672664.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND/AIMS: Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is useful for the pathological diagnosis of pancreatic masses, but patients are susceptible to severe bleeding and perforation. Because the incidence and severity of these complications have not been fully evaluated. METHODS: We aimed to evaluate severe bleeding and perforation after EUS-FNA for pancreatic masses using large-scale data derived from a Japanese nationwide administrative database. RESULTS: In total, 3,090 consecutive patients from 212 low- to high-volume hospitals were analyzed. Severe bleeding requiring transfusion or endoscopic treatment occurred in seven patients (0.23%), and no perforation was observed. No patient mortality was recorded within 30 days of EUS-FNA. The rate of severe bleeding in low-volume hospitals was significantly higher than that in medium- and high-volume hospitals (0.48% vs 0.10%, p=0.045). CONCLUSIONS: Severe bleeding and perforation following EUS-FNA for pancreatic masses are rare, and the procedure is safe.

3 Article Prognostic nomogram for nonresectable pancreatic cancer treated with gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. 2014

Hamada, T / Nakai, Y / Yasunaga, H / Isayama, H / Matsui, H / Takahara, N / Sasaki, T / Takagi, K / Watanabe, T / Yagioka, H / Kogure, H / Arizumi, T / Yamamoto, N / Ito, Y / Hirano, K / Tsujino, T / Tada, M / Koike, K. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655, Japan. · Department of Health Economics and Epidemiology Research, School of Public Health, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Kanto Central Hospital, 6-25-1 Kami-Yoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8531, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, JR Tokyo General Hospital, 2-1-3 Yoyogi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 151-8528, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Mitsui Memorial Hospital, 1 Izumi-cho, Kanda, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8643, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Japanese Red Cross Medical Center, Tokyo, 4-1-22 Hiroo, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-8935, Japan. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #24642625.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A nomogram is progressively being used as a useful predictive tool for cancer prognosis. A nomogram to predict survival in nonresectable pancreatic cancer treated with chemotherapy has not been reported. METHODS: Using prospectively collected data on patients with nonresectable pancreatic cancer receiving gemcitabine-based chemotherapy at five Japanese hospitals, we derived a predictive nomogram and internally validated it using a concordance index and calibration plots. RESULTS: In total, 531 patients were included between June 2001 and February 2013. The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) TNM stages were III and IV in 204 and 327 patients, respectively. The median survival time of the total cohort was 11.3 months. A nomogram was generated to predict survival probabilities at 6, 12, and 18 months and median survival time, based on the following six variables: age; sex; performance status; tumour size; regional lymph node metastasis; and distant metastasis. The concordance index of the present nomogram was higher than that of the AJCC TNM staging system at 12 months (0.686 vs 0.612). The calibration plots demonstrated good fitness of the nomogram for survival prediction. CONCLUSIONS: The present nomogram can provide valuable information for tailored decision-making early after the diagnosis of nonresectable pancreatic cancer.