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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Koji Yamaguchi
Based on 20 articles published since 2009
(Why 20 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Koji Yamaguchi wrote the following 20 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer 2016 From the Japan Pancreas Society: A Synopsis. 2017

Yamaguchi, Koji / Okusaka, Takuji / Shimizu, Kyoko / Furuse, Junji / Ito, Yoshinori / Hanada, Keiji / Shimosegawa, Tooru / Okazaki, Kazuichi / Anonymous7740903. ·From the *Clinic of Fukuoka Government Building, Hamanomachi Hospital, Fukuoka; †Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital; ‡Department of Gastroenterology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; §Department of Medical Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Kyorin University; ∥Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo; ¶Department of Gastroenterology, JA Onomichi General Hospital, Onomichi; #Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai; and **Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata, Japan. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #28426492.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer based on Evidence-Based Medicine 2006 were first published by the Japan Pancreas Society, and they were revised to Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer 2009 in July 2009 and were further revised to Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer 2013 in October 2013. These guidelines were established according to evidence-based medicine. In October 2016, the Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer were newly revised in Japanese. METHODS: In the revised version, we introduced the concepts of GRADE - grading recommendations assessment, development, and evaluation approach for better understanding of the current guidelines. RESULTS: The guidelines show algorithms for the diagnosis, treatment, and chemotherapy of pancreatic cancer and address 7 subjects: diagnosis, surgical therapy, adjuvant therapy, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, stent therapy, and palliative medicine. They include 51 clinical questions and 76 statements. There are statements corresponding to clinical questions, evidence levels, recommended strengths, and agreement rates. CONCLUSIONS: These guidelines represent the most standard clinical and practical management at this time in Japan. This is the English synopsis of the Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer 2016 in Japanese, which aims to disseminate the Japanese guidelines worldwide for the introduction of Japanese clinical management of these diseases.

2 Guideline EBM-based Clinical Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer (2013) issued by the Japan Pancreas Society: a synopsis. 2014

Yamaguchi, Koji / Okusaka, Takuji / Shimizu, Kyoko / Furuse, Junji / Ito, Yoshinori / Hanada, Keiji / Shimosegawa, Tooru / Anonymous6910805. ·Department of Advanced Treatment of Pancreatic Diseases, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu yamaguch@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp. · Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology Division, National Cancer Center, Tokyo. · Department of Gastroenterology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo. · Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Tokyo. · Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center, Tokyo. · Department of Gastroenterology, JA Onomichi General Hospital, Onomichi. · Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan. ·Jpn J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #25205672.

ABSTRACT: Clinical practice guidelines for pancreatic cancer based on evidence-based medicine (2006) were published by the Japan Pancreas Society (Committee for revision of clinical guidelines for pancreatic cancer) in March 2009 in Japanese, revised to Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer based on evidence-based medicine (2009) in July 2009 in Japanese and further revised to Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer (2013) in October 2013 in Japanese. These guidelines were established according to evidence-based medicine. A total of 629 papers were collected from among 4612 reports concerning pancreatic cancer listed in PubMed and Igakuchuo Zasshi between May 2007 and January 2011. This new set of guidelines was written by members of the Committee for the Revision of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer in the Japan Pancreas Society. The guidelines provide an algorithm for the diagnosis (Fig. 1) and treatment (Fig. 2) of pancreatic cancer and address six subjects (Diagnosis, Surgery, Adjuvant therapy, Radiation therapy, Chemotherapy and stent therapy), with 35 clinical questions and 57 recommendations.

3 Guideline International consensus guidelines 2012 for the management of IPMN and MCN of the pancreas. 2012

Tanaka, Masao / Fernández-del Castillo, Carlos / Adsay, Volkan / Chari, Suresh / Falconi, Massimo / Jang, Jin-Young / Kimura, Wataru / Levy, Philippe / Pitman, Martha Bishop / Schmidt, C Max / Shimizu, Michio / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Yamaguchi, Koji / Yamao, Kenji / Anonymous6680728. ·Department of Surgery and Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582, Japan. masaotan@med.kyushu-u.ac.jp ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #22687371.

ABSTRACT: The international consensus guidelines for management of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and mucinous cystic neoplasm of the pancreas established in 2006 have increased awareness and improved the management of these entities. During the subsequent 5 years, a considerable amount of information has been added to the literature. Based on a consensus symposium held during the 14th meeting of the International Association of Pancreatology in Fukuoka, Japan, in 2010, the working group has generated new guidelines. Since the levels of evidence for all items addressed in these guidelines are low, being 4 or 5, we still have to designate them "consensus", rather than "evidence-based", guidelines. To simplify the entire guidelines, we have adopted a statement format that differs from the 2006 guidelines, although the headings are similar to the previous guidelines, i.e., classification, investigation, indications for and methods of resection and other treatments, histological aspects, and methods of follow-up. The present guidelines include recent information and recommendations based on our current understanding, and highlight issues that remain controversial and areas where further research is required.

4 Guideline EBM-based Clinical Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer 2009 from the Japan Pancreas Society: a synopsis. 2011

Yamaguchi, Koji / Tanaka, Masao / Anonymous1220699. ·Department of Surgery 1, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan. yamaguch@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp ·Jpn J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #21719748.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Review International Association of Pancreatology (IAP)/European Pancreatic Club (EPC) consensus review of guidelines for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. 2016

Takaori, Kyoichi / Bassi, Claudio / Biankin, Andrew / Brunner, Thomas B / Cataldo, Ivana / Campbell, Fiona / Cunningham, David / Falconi, Massimo / Frampton, Adam E / Furuse, Junji / Giovannini, Marc / Jackson, Richard / Nakamura, Akira / Nealon, William / Neoptolemos, John P / Real, Francisco X / Scarpa, Aldo / Sclafani, Francesco / Windsor, John A / Yamaguchi, Koji / Wolfgang, Christopher / Johnson, Colin D / Anonymous480853. ·Department of Surgery, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. Electronic address: takaori@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, Pancreas Institute, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Academic Unit of Surgery, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Freiburg, Germany. · Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Pathology, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Department of Medicine, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London and Surrey, United Kingdom. · Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Università Vita e Salute, Milano, Italy. · HPB Surgical Unit, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College, Hammersmith Hospital, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Medical Oncology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. · Endoscopic Unit, Paoli-Calmettes Institute, Marseille, France. · NIHR Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto, Japan. · Division of General Surgery, Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States of America. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Surgery, University of Auckland, HBP/Upper GI Unit, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand. · Department of Advanced Treatment of Pancreatic Disease, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan. · Department of Surgery, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States of America. · University Surgical Unit, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, United Kingdom. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #26699808.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is one of the most devastating diseases with an extremely high mortality. Medical organizations and scientific societies have published a number of guidelines to address active treatment of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this consensus review was to identify where there is agreement or disagreement among the existing guidelines and to help define the gaps for future studies. METHODS: A panel of expert pancreatologists gathered at the 46th European Pancreatic Club Meeting combined with the 18th International Association of Pancreatology Meeting and collaborated on critical reviews of eight English language guidelines for the clinical management of pancreatic cancer. Clinical questions (CQs) of interest were proposed by specialists in each of nine areas. The recommendations for the CQs in existing guidelines, as well as the evidence on which these were based, were reviewed and compared. The evidence was graded as sufficient, mediocre or poor/absent. RESULTS: Only 4 of the 36 CQs, had sufficient evidence for agreement. There was also agreement in five additional CQs despite the lack of sufficient evidence. In 22 CQs, there was disagreement regardless of the presence or absence of evidence. There were five CQs that were not addressed adequately by existing guidelines. CONCLUSION: The existing guidelines provide both evidence- and consensus-based recommendations. There is also considerable disagreement about the recommendations in part due to the lack of high level evidence. Improving the clinical management of patients with pancreatic cancer, will require continuing efforts to undertake research that will provide sufficient evidence to allow agreement.

6 Article Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer 2016 from the Japan Pancreas Society. 2017

Yamaguchi, Koji. ·Clinic of Fukuoka Government Building, Hamanomachi Hospital. ·Nihon Shokakibyo Gakkai Zasshi · Pubmed #28381779.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Article [Clinical guidelines of pancreatic cancer 2013: a synopsis]. 2015

Yamaguchi, Koji. · ·Nihon Rinsho · Pubmed #25857055.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Article [Pancreatic ductal carcinoma derived from IPMN and concomitant with IPMN]. 2015

Yamaguchi, Koji. · ·Nihon Rinsho · Pubmed #25857022.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Article [Algorithm for treatment of pancreatic cancer]. 2015

Yamaguchi, Koji. · ·Nihon Rinsho · Pubmed #25856999.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Article Prognostic significance of WNT signaling in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2014

Nakamoto, Mitsuhiro / Matsuyama, Atsuji / Shiba, Eisuke / Shibuya, Ryo / Kasai, Takahiko / Yamaguchi, Koji / Hisaoka, Masanori. ·Department of Pathology and Oncology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, 1-1 Iseigaoka, Yahatanishi-ku, Kitakyushu, 807-8555, Japan. ·Virchows Arch · Pubmed #25146168.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is one of the most lethal human malignancies and is associated with a variety of molecular abnormalities. Although WNT signaling through its canonical/non-canonical pathways is one of the major factors involved in oncogenesis or progression of PDA, the prognostic significance of WNT signaling still remains poorly investigated. In this study, the status of the WNT signaling pathways was immunohistochemically analyzed in 101 PDAs, and its potential association with patient postoperative survival was assessed. Nuclear expression of beta-catenin, a hallmark of the activated canonical pathway, was identified in 59 cases, and was associated with reduced survival compared to the patients lacking nuclear beta-catenin expression (P = 0.002). In contrast, activation of the non-canonical pathway (25 cases), as indicated by co-expression of WNT2/5a and nuclear NFATc1, was not correlated with reduced survival (P = 0.268). Co-activation of both pathways (16 cases) was associated with worse prognosis in comparison with cases with an activated non-canonical pathway (P = 0.034). In addition, nuclear beta-catenin expression was an independent unfavorable prognostic factor (P = 0.006). Our data indicate that activated WNT signaling through its canonical pathway has a significantly negative effect on the clinical course of PDA, and the canonical WNT pathway should be considered as a future therapeutic target for PDA.

11 Article Mitochondrial transcription factor a worsens the clinical course of patients with pancreatic cancer through inhibition of apoptosis of cancer cells. 2014

Yamauchi, Masumi / Nakayama, Yoshifumi / Minagawa, Noritaka / Torigoe, Takayuki / Shibao, Kazunori / Yamaguchi, Koji. ·From the *Department of Surgery 1, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Yahata-nishi-ku; and †Department of Gastroenterological and General Surgery, Wakamatsu Hospital of University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Wakamatsu-ku, Kitakyushu, Japan. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #24622070.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) is mandatory for both the transcription and maintenance of mitochondrial DNA. This study aimed to investigate the significance of mtTFA expression in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). METHODS: Surgical specimens from 93 patients with PDAC who all underwent pancreatectomy were immunohistochemically stained using a polyclonal anti-mtTFA antibody. The relationship between the expression of mtTFA, clinicopathologic factors, and prognosis of these patients were evaluated. RESULTS: Positive mtTFA expression was significantly associated with lymphovascular invasion and metastatic recurrence in the liver and correlated with an advanced surgical stage. A univariate analysis showed that the patients with positive mtTFA expression had a significantly shorter survival time than those patients with negative mtTFA expression, and a multivariate analysis revealed that mtTFA expression was one of the independent prognostic factors in patients with PDAC. Positive mtTFA expression was significantly correlated with a low apoptotic index but not significantly correlated with the mind bomb homolog-1 (MIB-1) index. CONCLUSIONS: The expression mtTFA worsens the clinical course of patients with PDAC through the inhibition of apoptosis of PDAC cells and is an independent marker for the poor prognosis of the patients with PDAC after pancreatectomy. Mitochondrial transcription factor A may be a novel target for the treatment of PDAC.

12 Article Pancreatic somatostatinoma diagnosed preoperatively: report of a case. 2014

Mori, Yasuhisa / Sato, Norihiro / Taniguchi, Ryuta / Tamura, Toshihisa / Minagawa, Noritaka / Shibao, Kazunori / Higure, Aiichiro / Nakamoto, Mitsuhiro / Taguchi, Masashi / Yamaguchi, Koji. ·Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health. Kitakyushu, Japan. y-mori@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp. ·JOP · Pubmed #24413789.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: Somatostatinoma is a rare neoplasm of the pancreas. Preoperative diagnosis is often difficult. CASE REPORT: We report a 72-year-old woman with a pancreatic head tumor measuring 37 mm in diameter, and enlargement of the lymph nodes on the anterior surface of the pancreatic head and the posterior surface of the horizontal part of the duodenum. Laboratory data showed an elevated plasma somatostatin concentration. Examination of a biopsy specimen of the pancreatic head mass obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) showed histopathological features of a neuroendocrine tumor. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the tumor cells were positive for somatostatin, leading to a preoperative diagnosis of pancreatic somatostatinoma. The patient underwent pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. The plasma somatostatin concentration decreased progressively after surgery. CONCLUSIONS: A rare case of pancreatic somatostatinoma with lymph node metastases was presented. Immunohistochemical analysis of a biopsy specimen obtained by EUS-FNA was useful for preoperative diagnosis.

13 Article Prognostic impact of hyaluronan and its regulators in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2013

Cheng, Xiao-Bo / Sato, Norihiro / Kohi, Shiro / Yamaguchi, Koji. ·Department of Surgery 1, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan ; Department of Breast Surgery, the Fourth Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, China. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #24244714.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Although pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is characterized by an abundant stroma enriched with hyaluronan (HA), the prognostic impact of HA and its regulators remains unknown. METHODS: Using immunohistochemistry, expression patterns of HA and its regulators, including a synthesizing enzyme (HAS2), and a degrading enzyme (HYAL1) were investigated in patients who received surgical resection. The prognostic significance of these markers and other clinicopathological variables was determined using univariate and multivariate analyses. The HA levels were determined quantitatively by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). RESULTS: We found that strong expressions of HA (P=0.008) and HAS2 (P=0.022) were significantly associated with shorter survival time after surgery. By contrast, weak expression of HYAL1 was significantly associated with poor survival (P=0.001). In multivariate analysis, tumor stage (hazard ratio (HR)=2.76, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.14-6.66 P=0.024), strong HA expression (HR=6.04, 95%CI: 1.42-25.69 P=0.015), and weak HYAL1 expression (HR=3.16, 95%CI: 1.19-8.40 P=0.021) were independent factors predicting poor survival. ELISA revealed higher concentration of HA in pancreatic cancer tissues than in normal pancreatic tissues (P=0.001). CONCLUSION: These findings suggest, for the first time, that HA and its regulators may have prognostic impact in patients with pancreatic cancer.

14 Article [Serous cystadenoma of the pancreas showing enlargement on images: a case report]. 2012

Nakamoto, Mitsuhiro / Minagawa, Noritaka / Yamaguchi, Koji. ·Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, Yahatanishi-ku, Kitakyushu 807-8555, Japan. ·J UOEH · Pubmed #22768427.

ABSTRACT: Serious Cystadenoma (SCA) of the Pancreas is seldom malignant and is usually monitored over time. Here we report a case of SCA an enlarged cyst that had to be excised because it was difficult to diagnose by intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). The patient was a 58-year-old woman with thecoma of the right ovary accompanied by Meigs syndrome, who had undergone abdominal total hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy. Abdominal computed tomography scan (CT) showed a multilocular cyst 2.4 cm in diameter in the head of the pancreas. Fourteen months later, a periodic CT showed that the multilocular cyst had enlarged from 2.4 to 3.5 cm in diameter. Branch duct intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) with a tendency to enlargement and with mural nodule was suspected. Pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy (PPPD) was performed, and pathological findings revealed that the cyst was lined with a single layer of simple cuboidal epithelium. Periodic acid-Shiff staining, with and without diastase digestion, showed abundant glycogen within epithelial cells, yielding a definitive diagnosis of SCA. The ascites were probably due to the Meigs syndrome pressing the cyst, and the size of the cyst appeared smaller than the real size.

15 Article [Pancreatic tumor: progress in diagnosis and treatment. Topics: I. Pancreatic carcinoma; 6. Evidence based clinical practice guidelines for pancreatic cancer 2009]. 2012

Yamaguchi, Koji / Minagawa, Noritaka. ·Department of Surgery 1, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan. ·Nihon Naika Gakkai Zasshi · Pubmed #22413460.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Article [Clinical follow-up of branch duct IPMN]. 2012

Yamaguchi, Koji / Minagawa, Takanori / Kanemitsu, Shuichi / Tamura, Toshinao. ·Department of Surgery 1, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan. yamaguchi@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp ·Nihon Shokakibyo Gakkai Zasshi · Pubmed #22306540.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Article Association of microRNA-21 expression with its targets, PDCD4 and TIMP3, in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2012

Nagao, Yuichi / Hisaoka, Masanori / Matsuyama, Atsuji / Kanemitsu, Shuichi / Hamada, Tetsuo / Fukuyama, Tokihiko / Nakano, Ryuji / Uchiyama, Akihiko / Kawamoto, Masahiko / Yamaguchi, Koji / Hashimoto, Hiroshi. ·Department of Pathology and Oncology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan. ·Mod Pathol · Pubmed #21983937.

ABSTRACT: Since the discovery of small non-coding RNAs, the analyses of microRNA (miRNA) expression patterns in human cancer have provided new insights into cancer biology. miRNA-21 has been suggested to be one of the miRNAs that have an important role in the development or biological behavior of a variety of malignancies, including pancreatic cancer. This study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between the expression of miRNA-21 and that of its molecular targets, programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP3), in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. The study included 65 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas and 5 normal pancreatic tissue specimens for comparison. The miRNA expression profiling of five selected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas and five normal pancreatic specimens was performed using a microarray platform, and was evaluated by a hierarchical clustering analysis. The miRNA most highly expressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (ie, miRNA-21) was further assessed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) assays in the 65 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cases. The expression pattern of its molecular targets (eg, PDCD4 and TIMP3) in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma was examined immunohistochemically. In the microarray analyses, 28 miRNAs were upregulated in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma compared with normal pancreatic tissue, whereas 48 miRNAs were downregulated. miRNA-21 was the most significantly overexpressed miRNA in the pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas analyzed, and was also highly expressed in 75% of the 65 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas examined by real-time RT-PCR. High miRNA-21 expression was correlated with a worse prognosis in the pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients (P=0.045). The immunohistochemical expression patterns of PDCD4 (reduced nuclear staining pattern) and TIMP3 (downregulated expression) were significantly associated with both the upregulated miR-21 expression (P<0.05) and the poor survival of the patients (P<0.001 and P=0.001, respectively). Our data suggest that an overexpression of miRNA-21 is, therefore, associated with the biological behavior of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma via the downregulation of the expression of tumor suppressors, PDCD4 and TIMP3, thus resulting in tumor progression and the adverse clinical course of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

18 Article Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma derived from IPMN and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma concomitant with IPMN. 2011

Yamaguchi, Koji / Kanemitsu, Shuichi / Hatori, Takashi / Maguchi, Hiroyuki / Shimizu, Yasuhiro / Tada, Minoru / Nakagohri, Toshio / Hanada, Keiji / Osanai, Manabu / Noda, Yutaka / Nakaizumi, Akihiko / Furukawa, Toru / Ban, Shinichi / Nobukawa, Bunsei / Kato, Yo / Tanaka, Masao. ·Department of Surgery 1, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan. yamaguch@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp ·Pancreas · Pubmed #21499212.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) may derive from an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas or may develop in the pancreatic duct apart from IPMN. The purpose of this study was to define the clinicopathological features of these 2 entities and compare them with those of ordinary PDAC. METHODS: Of 765 patients who had surgical resection for IPMN, 122 were diagnosed as having PDAC derived from IPMN and 31 with PDAC concomitant with IPMN. In addition, 7605 patients with PDAC who were registered in the Japan Pancreas Society pancreatic cancer registry were compared with the above patients. RESULTS: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas derived from IPMN and concomitant with IPMN were significantly smaller, less invasive, and less extensive than ordinary PDAC. The median survival of patients with the 2 conditions was significantly longer than for those with ordinary PDAC when compared overall or when limited to TS2 (2.0 cm < tumor size ≤ 4.0 cm) or TS3 (4.0 cm < tumor size ≤ 6.0 cm) cases. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that PDAC concomitant with IPMN and PDAC derived from IPMN may have more favorable biological behaviors or be diagnosed earlier than ordinary PDAC.

19 Article How to define patients at high risk for pancreatic cancer. 2011

Yamaguchi, Koji. ·Department of Surgery 1, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health Japan, Yahatanishiku, Kitakyusyu, Japan. yamaguch @ med.uoeh-u.ac.jp ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #21464580.

ABSTRACT: The clinical outcome of patients with pancreatic cancer remains dismal despite recent advances in diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. Several risk factors have been reported regarding the development of pancreatic cancer. These risk factors include family history, accompanying diseases, and lifestyle/personal habits. Family history includes that of pancreatic cancer and hereditary pancreatic cancer syndrome. Accompanying diseases that increase the risk include diabetes mellitus, obesity, chronic pancreatitis, hereditary pancreatic cancer syndrome and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms. Lifestyle-associated factors include smoking and diet. Detailed examination of patients with such risk factors is warranted, but the cost-benefit effect should be considered. Thus, patients with more than one risk factor should be carefully followed up, and periodic examination of such patients is necessary to ensure the detection of smaller and less-advanced pancreatic cancer lesions and thus to improve the clinical outcome of patients with pancreatic cancer.

20 Article Gamma-secretase complexes regulate the responses of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells to taxanes. 2010

Tasaka, Takehiko / Akiyoshi, Takashi / Yamaguchi, Koji / Tanaka, Masao / Onishi, Hideya / Katano, Mitsuo. ·Department of Cancer Therapy and Research, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582, Japan. ·Anticancer Res · Pubmed #21187481.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND/AIM: It was previously reported that γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) enhance taxane-induced mitotic arrest and apoptosis in colon cancer cells. To enable the development of taxane-based chemotherapy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), this study investigated the molecular mechanisms by which γ-secretase (GS) complexes regulate taxane sensitivity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The effect of GS complexes on taxane-induced apoptosis in PDAC cells was evaluated by a cell cycle analysis. GS complexes were examined with small interference RNAs targeted to GS complex-related genes. RESULTS: GSIs and silencing of presenilin 1 (PS1) did not affect cell proliferation but resulted in enhanced taxane-induced G(2)/M accumulation and apoptosis. Silencing of the Notch gene did not induce these effects. However, PS2-specific silencing suppressed proliferation and taxane-induced apoptosis. CONCLUSION: Data from this study indicate that GS complexes regulate the response of PDAC to taxanes through GS-dependent and GS-independent mechanisms.