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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Edward M. Wolin
Based on 14 articles published since 2010
(Why 14 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Edward Wolin wrote the following 14 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Appropriateness of systemic treatments in unresectable metastatic well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2015

Strosberg, Jonathan R / Fisher, George A / Benson, Al B / Anthony, Lowell B / Arslan, Bulent / Gibbs, John F / Greeno, Edward / Iyer, Renuka V / Kim, Michelle K / Maples, William J / Philip, Philip A / Wolin, Edward M / Cherepanov, Dasha / Broder, Michael S. ·Jonathan R Strosberg, Department of Gastrointestinal Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL 33612, United States. ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #25741154.

ABSTRACT: AIM: To evaluate systemic treatment choices in unresectable metastatic well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) and provide consensus treatment recommendations. METHODS: Systemic treatment options for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors have expanded in recent years to include somatostatin analogs, angiogenesis inhibitors, inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin and cytotoxic agents. At this time, there is little data to guide treatment selection and sequence. We therefore assembled a panel of expert physicians to evaluate systemic treatment choices and provide consensus treatment recommendations. Treatment appropriateness ratings were collected using the RAND/UCLA modified Delphi process. After studying the literature, a multidisciplinary panel of 10 physicians assessed the appropriateness of various medical treatment scenarios on a 1-9 scale. Ratings were done both before and after an extended discussion of the evidence. Quantitative measurements of agreement were made and consensus statements developed from the second round ratings. RESULTS: Specialties represented were medical and surgical oncology, interventional radiology, and gastroenterology. Panelists had practiced for a mean of 15.5 years (range: 6-33). Among 202 rated scenarios, disagreement decreased from 13.2% (26 scenarios) before the face-to-face discussion of evidence to 1% (2) after. In the final ratings, 46.5% (94 scenarios) were rated inappropriate, 21.8% (44) were uncertain, and 30.7% (62) were appropriate. Consensus statements from the scenarios included: (1) it is appropriate to use somatostatin analogs as first line therapy in patients with hormonally functional tumors and may be appropriate in patients who are asymptomatic; (2) it is appropriate to use everolimus, sunitinib, or cytotoxic chemotherapy therapy as first line therapy in patients with symptomatic or progressive tumors; and (3) beyond first line, these same agents can be used. In patients with uncontrolled secretory symptoms, octreotide LAR doses can be titrated up to 60 mg every 4 wk or up to 40 mg every 3 or 4 wk. CONCLUSION: Using the Delphi process allowed physician experts to systematically obtain a consensus on the appropriateness of a variety of medical therapies in patients with PNETs.

2 Review PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway inhibitors in the therapy of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2013

Wolin, Edward M. ·Division of Hematology/Oncology, Samuel Oschin Cancer Center, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA. edward.wolin@cshs.org ·Cancer Lett · Pubmed #23419523.

ABSTRACT: The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is implicated in the pathogenesis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs). Activation of this pathway is driven by aberrant tyrosine kinase receptor activities. Mutations in the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway occur in 15% of pNETs, and expression of genes of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway is altered in the majority of pNETs. The mTOR inhibitor everolimus has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of pNET, but its efficacy may be limited by its inability to prevent mTORC2-mediated activation of Akt. Specific inhibitors of PI3K, Akt, or other pathway nodes, and their concomitant use with mTOR inhibitors, or agents with dual activity, may be more effective. Preclinical studies demonstrate that inhibitors of the PI3K pathway have antitumor activity in pNET cells, either through direct inhibition of individual pathway nodes or indirect inhibition of molecular chaperones such as heat-shock protein 90. Clinical studies are underway evaluating individual node and dual node inhibitors.

3 Clinical Trial Anti-tumour effects of lanreotide for pancreatic and intestinal neuroendocrine tumours: the CLARINET open-label extension study. 2016

Caplin, Martyn E / Pavel, Marianne / Ćwikła, Jarosław B / Phan, Alexandria T / Raderer, Markus / Sedláčková, Eva / Cadiot, Guillaume / Wolin, Edward M / Capdevila, Jaume / Wall, Lucy / Rindi, Guido / Langley, Alison / Martinez, Séverine / Gomez-Panzani, Edda / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Anonymous1290854. ·Royal Free HospitalLondon, UKCharité University Medicine BerlinBerlin, GermanyUniversity of Warmia and MazuryOlsztyn, PolandUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHouston, Texas, USAUniversity HospitalVienna, AustriaDepartment of Oncology of the First Faculty of Medicine and General Teaching HospitalPrague, Czech RepublicRobert-Debré HospitalReims, FranceMarkey Cancer CenterUniversity of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USAVall d'Hebron University HospitalBarcelona, SpainWestern General HospitalEdinburgh, UKUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreRome, ItalyIpsenLes Ulis, FranceIpsenBasking Ridge, New Jersey, USABeaujon HospitalClichy, FranceParis Diderot UniversityParis, France m.caplin@ucl.ac.uk. · Royal Free HospitalLondon, UKCharité University Medicine BerlinBerlin, GermanyUniversity of Warmia and MazuryOlsztyn, PolandUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHouston, Texas, USAUniversity HospitalVienna, AustriaDepartment of Oncology of the First Faculty of Medicine and General Teaching HospitalPrague, Czech RepublicRobert-Debré HospitalReims, FranceMarkey Cancer CenterUniversity of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USAVall d'Hebron University HospitalBarcelona, SpainWestern General HospitalEdinburgh, UKUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreRome, ItalyIpsenLes Ulis, FranceIpsenBasking Ridge, New Jersey, USABeaujon HospitalClichy, FranceParis Diderot UniversityParis, France. · Royal Free HospitalLondon, UKCharité University Medicine BerlinBerlin, GermanyUniversity of Warmia and MazuryOlsztyn, PolandUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHouston, Texas, USAUniversity HospitalVienna, AustriaDepartment of Oncology of the First Faculty of Medicine and General Teaching HospitalPrague, Czech RepublicRobert-Debré HospitalReims, FranceMarkey Cancer CenterUniversity of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USAVall d'Hebron University HospitalBarcelona, SpainWestern General HospitalEdinburgh, UKUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreRome, ItalyIpsenLes Ulis, FranceIpsenBasking Ridge, New Jersey, USABeaujon HospitalClichy, FranceParis Diderot UniversityParis, France Royal Free HospitalLondon, UKCharité University Medicine BerlinBerlin, GermanyUniversity of Warmia and MazuryOlsztyn, PolandUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHouston, Texas, USAUniversity HospitalVienna, AustriaDepartment of Oncology of the First Faculty of Medicine and General Teaching HospitalPrague, Czech RepublicRobert-Debré HospitalReims, FranceMarkey Cancer CenterUniversity of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USAVall d'Hebron University HospitalBarcelona, SpainWestern General HospitalEdinburgh, UKUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreRome, ItalyIpsenLes Ulis, FranceIpsenBasking Ridge, New Jersey, USABeaujon HospitalClichy, FranceParis Diderot UniversityParis, France. ·Endocr Relat Cancer · Pubmed #26743120.

ABSTRACT: In the CLARINET study, lanreotide Autogel (depot in USA) significantly prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with metastatic pancreatic/intestinal neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). We report long-term safety and additional efficacy data from the open-label extension (OLE). Patients with metastatic grade 1/2 (Ki-67 ≤ 10%) non-functioning NET and documented baseline tumour-progression status received lanreotide Autogel 120 mg (n = 101) or placebo (n = 103) for 96 weeks or until death/progressive disease (PD) in CLARINET study. Patients with stable disease (SD) at core study end (lanreotide/placebo) or PD (placebo only) continued or switched to lanreotide in the OLE. In total, 88 patients (previously: lanreotide, n = 41; placebo, n = 47) participated: 38% had pancreatic, 39% midgut and 23% other/unknown primary tumours. Patients continuing lanreotide reported fewer adverse events (AEs) (all and treatment-related) during OLE than core study. Placebo-to-lanreotide switch patients reported similar AE rates in OLE and core studies, except more diarrhoea was considered treatment-related in OLE (overall diarrhoea unchanged). Median lanreotide PFS (core study randomisation to PD in core/OLE; n=101) was 32.8 months (95% CI: 30.9, 68.0). A sensitivity analysis, addressing potential selection bias by assuming that patients with SD on lanreotide in the core study and not entering the OLE (n=13) had PD 24 weeks after last core assessment, found median PFS remaining consistent: 30.8 months (95% CI: 30.0, 31.3). Median time to further PD after placebo-to-lanreotide switch (n=32) was 14.0 months (10.1; not reached). This OLE study suggests long-term treatment with lanreotide Autogel 120 mg maintained favourable safety/tolerability. CLARINET OLE data also provide new evidence of lanreotide anti-tumour benefits in indolent and progressive pancreatic/intestinal NETs.

4 Clinical Trial Impact of prior chemotherapy use on the efficacy of everolimus in patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: a subgroup analysis of the phase III RADIANT-3 trial. 2015

Lombard-Bohas, Catherine / Yao, James C / Hobday, Timothy / Van Cutsem, Eric / Wolin, Edward M / Panneerselvam, Ashok / Stergiopoulos, Sotirios / Shah, Manisha H / Capdevila, Jaume / Pommier, Rodney. ·From the *Department of Medical Oncology, Hôpital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France; †Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; ‡Department of Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN; §Digestive Oncology, University Hospitals Gasthuisberg/Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; ∥Department of Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA; ¶Department of Oncology Biometrics and Data, and #Department of Oncology, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ; **Department of Medical Oncology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; ††Department of Medical Oncology, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain; and ‡‡Division of Surgical Oncology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #25479584.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate efficacy and safety of everolimus in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) by prior chemotherapy use in the RAD001 in Advanced Neuroendocrine Tumors, Third Trial (RADIANT-3). METHODS: Patients with advanced, progressive, low- or intermediate-grade pNET were prospectively stratified by prior chemotherapy use and World Health Organization performance status and were randomly assigned (1:1) to everolimus 10 mg/d (n = 207) or placebo (n = 203). RESULTS: Of the 410 patients, 204 (50%) were naive to chemotherapy (chemonaive). Baseline characteristics were similar for patients with or without prior chemotherapy. Everolimus significantly prolonged median progression-free survival regardless of prior chemotherapy use (prior chemotherapy: 11.0 vs 3.2 months; hazard ratio, 0.34; 95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.48; P < 0.0001) (chemonaive: 11.4 vs 5.4 months; hazard ratio, 0.42; 95% confidence interval, 0.29-0.60; P < 0.0001). Stable disease was the best overall response in 73% of everolimus-treated patients (151/207). The most common drug-related adverse events included stomatitis (60%-69%), rash (47%-50%), and diarrhea (34%). CONCLUSIONS: As more treatment options become available, it is important to consider the goals of treatment and to identify patients who would potentially benefit from a specific therapy. Findings from this planned subgroup analysis suggest the potential for first-line use of everolimus in patients with advanced pNET.

5 Clinical Trial Lanreotide in metastatic enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2014

Caplin, Martyn E / Pavel, Marianne / Ćwikła, Jarosław B / Phan, Alexandria T / Raderer, Markus / Sedláčková, Eva / Cadiot, Guillaume / Wolin, Edward M / Capdevila, Jaume / Wall, Lucy / Rindi, Guido / Langley, Alison / Martinez, Séverine / Blumberg, Joëlle / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Anonymous1240800. ·From Royal Free Hospital, London (M.E.C.) · Charité University Medicine Berlin, Berlin (M.P.) · University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland (J.B.Ć.) · University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston (A.T.P.) · University Hospital, Vienna (M.R.) · Department of Oncology of the First Faculty of Medicine and General Teaching Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic (E.S.) · Robert-Debré Hospital, Reims (G.C.), Ipsen, Les Ulis, (A.L., S.M., J.B.), Beaujon Hospital, Clichy (P.R.), and Paris Diderot University, Paris (P.R.) - all in France · Samuel Oschin Cancer Center, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles (E.M.W.) · Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona (J.C.) · Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (L.W.) · and Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome (G.R.). ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #25014687.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Somatostatin analogues are commonly used to treat symptoms associated with hormone hypersecretion in neuroendocrine tumors; however, data on their antitumor effects are limited. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multinational study of the somatostatin analogue lanreotide in patients with advanced, well-differentiated or moderately differentiated, nonfunctioning, somatostatin receptor-positive neuroendocrine tumors of grade 1 or 2 (a tumor proliferation index [on staining for the Ki-67 antigen] of <10%) and documented disease-progression status. The tumors originated in the pancreas, midgut, or hindgut or were of unknown origin. Patients were randomly assigned to receive an extended-release aqueous-gel formulation of lanreotide (Autogel [known in the United States as Depot], Ipsen) at a dose of 120 mg (101 patients) or placebo (103 patients) once every 28 days for 96 weeks. The primary end point was progression-free survival, defined as the time to disease progression (according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, version 1.0) or death. Secondary end points included overall survival, quality of life (assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer questionnaires QLQ-C30 and QLQ-GI.NET21), and safety. RESULTS: Most patients (96%) had no tumor progression in the 3 to 6 months before randomization, and 33% had hepatic tumor volumes greater than 25%. Lanreotide, as compared with placebo, was associated with significantly prolonged progression-free survival (median not reached vs. median of 18.0 months, P<0.001 by the stratified log-rank test; hazard ratio for progression or death, 0.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.30 to 0.73). The estimated rates of progression-free survival at 24 months were 65.1% (95% CI, 54.0 to 74.1) in the lanreotide group and 33.0% (95% CI, 23.0 to 43.3) in the placebo group. The therapeutic effect in predefined subgroups was generally consistent with that in the overall population, with the exception of small subgroups in which confidence intervals were wide. There were no significant between-group differences in quality of life or overall survival. The most common treatment-related adverse event was diarrhea (in 26% of the patients in the lanreotide group and 9% of those in the placebo group). CONCLUSIONS: Lanreotide was associated with significantly prolonged progression-free survival among patients with metastatic enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors of grade 1 or 2 (Ki-67 <10%). (Funded by Ipsen; CLARINET ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00353496; EudraCT 2005-004904-35.).

6 Clinical Trial Everolimus for advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2011

Yao, James C / Shah, Manisha H / Ito, Tetsuhide / Bohas, Catherine Lombard / Wolin, Edward M / Van Cutsem, Eric / Hobday, Timothy J / Okusaka, Takuji / Capdevila, Jaume / de Vries, Elisabeth G E / Tomassetti, Paola / Pavel, Marianne E / Hoosen, Sakina / Haas, Tomas / Lincy, Jeremie / Lebwohl, David / Öberg, Kjell / Anonymous2070686. ·University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. jyao@mdanderson.org ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #21306238.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Everolimus, an oral inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), has shown antitumor activity in patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, in two phase 2 studies. We evaluated the agent in a prospective, randomized, phase 3 study. METHODS: We randomly assigned 410 patients who had advanced, low-grade or intermediate-grade pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors with radiologic progression within the previous 12 months to receive everolimus, at a dose of 10 mg once daily (207 patients), or placebo (203 patients), both in conjunction with best supportive care. The primary end point was progression-free survival in an intention-to-treat analysis. In the case of patients in whom radiologic progression occurred during the study, the treatment assignments could be revealed, and patients who had been randomly assigned to placebo were offered open-label everolimus. RESULTS: The median progression-free survival was 11.0 months with everolimus as compared with 4.6 months with placebo (hazard ratio for disease progression or death from any cause with everolimus, 0.35; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.27 to 0.45; P<0.001), representing a 65% reduction in the estimated risk of progression or death. Estimates of the proportion of patients who were alive and progression-free at 18 months were 34% (95% CI, 26 to 43) with everolimus as compared with 9% (95% CI, 4 to 16) with placebo. Drug-related adverse events were mostly grade 1 or 2 and included stomatitis (in 64% of patients in the everolimus group vs. 17% in the placebo group), rash (49% vs. 10%), diarrhea (34% vs. 10%), fatigue (31% vs. 14%), and infections (23% vs. 6%), which were primarily upper respiratory. Grade 3 or 4 events that were more frequent with everolimus than with placebo included anemia (6% vs. 0%) and hyperglycemia (5% vs. 2%). The median exposure to everolimus was longer than exposure to placebo by a factor of 2.3 (38 weeks vs. 16 weeks). CONCLUSIONS: Everolimus, as compared with placebo, significantly prolonged progression-free survival among patients with progressive advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and was associated with a low rate of severe adverse events. (Funded by Novartis Oncology; RADIANT-3 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00510068.).

7 Article Real-world approaches for extending progression-free survival in patients with metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: focus on timing, sequencing, regimen initiation, and maintenance strategies using somatostatin analogs, targeted agents, and peptide receptor radiotherapy. 2018

Wolin, Edward M. ·Center for Carcinoid and Neuroendocrine Tumors, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York. ·Clin Adv Hematol Oncol · Pubmed #30807563.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Article Differences and Similarities in the Clinicopathological Features of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors in China and the United States: A Multicenter Study. 2016

Zhu, Li-Ming / Tang, Laura / Qiao, Xin-Wei / Wolin, Edward / Nissen, Nicholas N / Dhall, Deepti / Chen, Jie / Shen, Lin / Chi, Yihebali / Yuan, Yao-Zong / Ben, Qi-Wen / Lv, Bin / Zhou, Ya-Ru / Bai, Chun-Mei / Chen, Jie / Song, Yu-Li / Song, Tian-Tian / Lu, Chong-Mei / Yu, Run / Chen, Yuan-Jia. ·From the Department of Gastroenterology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (L-MZ, X-WQ, Y-LS, T-TS, C-ML, Y-JC) · Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (LT) · Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (EW) · Department of Surgery (NNN) · Department of Pathology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (DD) · Department of Gastroenterology, the First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (JC) · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, Peking University School of Oncology, Beijing Cancer Hospital and Institute (LS) · Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (YC) · Department of Gastroenterology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (Y-ZY, Q-WB) · Department of Gastroenterology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou (BL) · Department of Endocrinology, the Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang (Y-RZ) · Department of Oncology (C-MB) · Department of Pathology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (JC) · and Division of Endocrinology and Carcinoid and Neuroendocrine Tumor Center, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (RY). ·Medicine (Baltimore) · Pubmed #26886644.

ABSTRACT: The presentation, pathology, and prognosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) in Asian patients have not been studied in large cohorts. We hypothesized that the clinicopathological features of PNETs of Chinese patients might be different from those of US patients. The objectives of this study were to address whether PNETs in Chinese patients exhibit unique clinicopathological features and natural history, and can be graded and staged using the WHO/ENETS criteria. This is a retrospective review of medical records of patients with PNETs in multiple academic medical centers in China (7) and the United States (2). Tumor grading and staging were based on WHO/ENETS criteria. The clinicopathological features of PNETs of Chinese and US patients were compared. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to find associations between survival and patient demographics, tumor grade and stage, and other clinicopathological characteristics. A total of 977 (527 Chinese and 450 US) patients with PNETs were studied. In general, Chinese patients were younger than US patients (median age 46 vs 56 years). In Chinese patients, insulinomas were the most common (52.2%), followed by nonfunctional tumors (39.7%), whereas the order was reversed in US patients. Tumor grade distribution was similar in the 2 countries (G1: 57.5% vs 55.0%; G2: 38.5% vs 41.3%; and G3: 4.0% vs 3.7%). However, age, primary tumor size, primary tumor location, grade, and stage of subtypes of PNETs were significantly different between the 2 countries. The Chinese nonfunctional tumors were significantly larger than US ones (median size 4 vs 3 cm) and more frequently located in the head/neck region (54.9% vs 34.8%). The Chinese and US insulinomas were similar in size (median 1.5 cm) but the Chinese insulinomas relatively more frequently located in the head/neck region (48.3% vs 26.1%). Higher grade, advanced stage, metastasis, and larger primary tumor size were significantly associated with unfavorable survival in both countries. Several clinicopathological differences are found between Chinese and US PNETs but the PNETs of both countries follow a similar natural history. The WHO tumor grading and ENETS staging criteria are applicable to both Chinese and US patients.

9 Article Long-term everolimus treatment of patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2014

Wolin, Edward M. ·Markey Cancer Center/University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky., USA. ·Chemotherapy · Pubmed #25766415.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND/AIMS: Based on the significant prolongation of progression-free survival in a randomized phase III trial, RADIANT-3 (RAD001 in Advanced Neuroendocrine Tumors, Third Trial), everolimus has been approved for the management of advanced, progressive pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET). Here, we describe 15 participants in RADIANT-3 who were treated with everolimus at our study center. We report the long-term survival of a subset of patients. METHODS: Patients with advanced, progressive pNET were randomly assigned to the everolimus arm of RADIANT-3 or received everolimus as open-label treatment after experiencing progression on placebo or during the unblinded phase. RESULTS: Five patients on everolimus (5-10 mg/day) had stable disease for >43 to >76 months after initiating treatment. Three patients achieved stable disease for 19-25 months, but died of progressive malignancy thereafter. Seven patients had stable disease for ≤11 months after initiating everolimus therapy. CONCLUSION: Patients with advanced, progressive pNET can obtain long-term benefit from daily oral treatment with everolimus.

10 Article Humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy caused by parathyroid hormone-related peptide-secreting neuroendocrine tumors. Report of six cases. 2013

Milanesi, Anna / Yu, Run / Wolin, Edward M. ·Division of Endocrinology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #23719609.

ABSTRACT: We report the clinical characteristics and management of six patients with metastatic gastroentero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (NET) presenting with severe hypercalcemia due to elevation of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP). All patients had histological confirmation of NET, five well-differentiated and one poorly differentiated. In 5 patients, hypercalcemia developed after years after the initial diagnosis of NET. One patient presented with concomitant elevation of PTHrP and intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) in the setting of multiple endocrine neoplasia 1 (MEN1). In all the other cases, PTH levels were low or undetectable. Management of malignant hypercalcemia due to PTHrP-producing NET is challenging, and optimal therapy depends on the extent of metastatic disease and the grade of malignancy. Aggressive tumor cytoreduction in addition to the systemic treatment modalities is frequently used to control disease progression and endocrine symptoms. To our knowledge, this is the largest series to date of hypercalcemia mediated by PTHrP-secreting NET.

11 Article Mixed acinar-endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas: new clinical and pathological features in a contemporary series. 2013

Yu, Run / Jih, Lily / Zhai, Jing / Nissen, Nicholas N / Colquhoun, Steven / Wolin, Edward / Dhall, Deepti. ·Division of Endocrinology, Department of Pathology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA. run.yu@cshs.org ·Pancreas · Pubmed #23462323.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to characterize the novel clinical and pathological features of mixed acinar-endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas. METHODS: This was a retrospective review of medical records and surgical pathology specimens of patients with a diagnosis of mixed acinar-endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center between 2005 and 2011. Additional immunohistochemistry was performed on the specimens of some patients. RESULTS: Five patients were identified. The median age at presentation was 74 years (range, 59-89 years), and all patients were male. The presenting symptoms were all related to tumor mass effects. The median size of the tumor was 10 cm (range, 3.9-16 cm). Preoperative clinical diagnosis aided by fine-needle aspiration biopsy was incorrect in all 5 cases. Most tumors (3/5) exhibited predominantly endocrine differentiation without hormonal production. Only 10% to 30% of cells were truly amphicrine, whereas most were differentiated into either endocrine or acinar phenotype. The clinical behavior ranged from moderate to aggressive with postoperative survival from 2.5 months to more than 3 years. Four patients received neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy with variable responses. CONCLUSIONS: Mixed acinar-endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas appears to be not uncommon in men, may harbor predominantly endocrine component, is often misdiagnosed by cytology, and exhibits variable clinical behavior. Mixed acinar-endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas should be considered in older patients with sizable pancreatic mass and may warrant aggressive surgical resection and chemotherapy.

12 Article Concurrent primary hyperparathyroidism and humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy in a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. 2011

Milanesi, Anna / Yu, Run / Geller, Stephen A / Burton, Doug / Deftos, Leonard J / Wolin, Edward M. ·Division of Endocrinology, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #21483254.

ABSTRACT: We report a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 presenting with elevation of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) from a metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET), and parathyroid hormone (PTH) from primary hyperparathyroidism, resulting in severe hypercalcemia. Parathyroid hormone-related protein production by the PNET was confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis. Hypercalcemia and elevated PTHrP improved markedly with hepatic artery chemoembolization of liver metastasis. Thus, in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, correct identification of the cause of hypercalcemia as PTHrP production from a PNET or PTH production from a parathyroid tumor has important therapeutic implications.

13 Unspecified Therapeutic advances in metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma and related cancers: focus on evidence-based and sequenced approaches to survival extension in metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2018

Bekaii-Saab, Tanios / Yu, Kenneth / Lima, Caio M S R / Wolin, Edward M. ·Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Phoenix, Arizona. · Gastrointestinal Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. · Center for Carcinoid and Neuroendocrine Tumors, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York. ·Clin Adv Hematol Oncol · Pubmed #30807558.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Minor Radioembolization for treatment of liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumors: correlation with imaging and biomarkers. 2013

Ozao-Choy, Junko / Friedman, Marc L / Kim, Amanda S / Wachsman, Ashely / Wolin, Edward M / Yu, Run / Nissen, Nicholas N / Colquhoun, Steven D. · ·Pancreas · Pubmed #23407486.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --