Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Ignacio Ivan Wistuba
Based on 7 articles published since 2010
(Why 7 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, I. Wistuba wrote the following 7 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article METTL13 Methylation of eEF1A Increases Translational Output to Promote Tumorigenesis. 2019

Liu, Shuo / Hausmann, Simone / Carlson, Scott Moore / Fuentes, Mary Esmeralda / Francis, Joel William / Pillai, Renjitha / Lofgren, Shane Michael / Hulea, Laura / Tandoc, Kristofferson / Lu, Jiuwei / Li, Ami / Nguyen, Nicholas Dang / Caporicci, Marcello / Kim, Michael Paul / Maitra, Anirban / Wang, Huamin / Wistuba, Ignacio Ivan / Porco, John Anthony / Bassik, Michael Cory / Elias, Joshua Eric / Song, Jikui / Topisirovic, Ivan / Van Rechem, Capucine / Mazur, Pawel Karol / Gozani, Or. ·Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. · Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. · Lady Davis Institute and Gerald Bronfman Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3T 1E2, Canada. · Department of Biochemistry, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521, USA. · Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. · Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Department of Translational Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Department of Translational Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Department of Translational Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Department of Chemistry, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA. · Deparment of Chemical and Systems Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. · Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address: pkmazur@mdanderson.org. · Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. Electronic address: ogozani@stanford.edu. ·Cell · Pubmed #30612740.

ABSTRACT: Increased protein synthesis plays an etiologic role in diverse cancers. Here, we demonstrate that METTL13 (methyltransferase-like 13) dimethylation of eEF1A (eukaryotic elongation factor 1A) lysine 55 (eEF1AK55me2) is utilized by Ras-driven cancers to increase translational output and promote tumorigenesis in vivo. METTL13-catalyzed eEF1A methylation increases eEF1A's intrinsic GTPase activity in vitro and protein production in cells. METTL13 and eEF1AK55me2 levels are upregulated in cancer and negatively correlate with pancreatic and lung cancer patient survival. METTL13 deletion and eEF1AK55me2 loss dramatically reduce Ras-driven neoplastic growth in mouse models and in patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) from primary pancreatic and lung tumors. Finally, METTL13 depletion renders PDX tumors hypersensitive to drugs that target growth-signaling pathways. Together, our work uncovers a mechanism by which lethal cancers become dependent on the METTL13-eEF1AK55me2 axis to meet their elevated protein synthesis requirement and suggests that METTL13 inhibition may constitute a targetable vulnerability of tumors driven by aberrant Ras signaling.

2 Article Dynamic changes during the treatment of pancreatic cancer. 2018

Wolff, Robert A / Wang-Gillam, Andrea / Alvarez, Hector / Tiriac, Hervé / Engle, Dannielle / Hou, Shurong / Groff, Abigail F / San Lucas, Anthony / Bernard, Vincent / Allenson, Kelvin / Castillo, Jonathan / Kim, Dong / Mulu, Feven / Huang, Jonathan / Stephens, Bret / Wistuba, Ignacio I / Katz, Matthew / Varadhachary, Gauri / Park, YoungKyu / Hicks, James / Chinnaiyan, Arul / Scampavia, Louis / Spicer, Timothy / Gerhardinger, Chiara / Maitra, Anirban / Tuveson, David / Rinn, John / Lizee, Gregory / Yee, Cassian / Levine, Arnold J. ·Department of Gastrointestinal (GI) Medical Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Division of Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Pathology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Molecular Therapeutics, The Scripps Research Institute, Jupiter, FL, USA. · Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, The Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA, USA. · Department of Translational Molecular Pathology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Surgical Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Center for Translational Pathology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · Current address: University of Colorado Boulder, BioFrontiers Institute, Boulder, CO, USA. · Department of Melanoma Medical Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Simons Center for Systems Biology, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ, USA. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #29599906.

ABSTRACT: This manuscript follows a single patient with pancreatic adenocarcinoma for a five year period, detailing the clinical record, pathology, the dynamic evolution of molecular and cellular alterations as well as the responses to treatments with chemotherapies, targeted therapies and immunotherapies. DNA and RNA samples from biopsies and blood identified a dynamic set of changes in allelic imbalances and copy number variations in response to therapies. Organoid cultures established from biopsies over time were employed for extensive drug testing to determine if this approach was feasible for treatments. When an unusual drug response was detected, an extensive RNA sequencing analysis was employed to establish novel mechanisms of action of this drug. Organoid cell cultures were employed to identify possible antigens associated with the tumor and the patient's T-cells were expanded against one of these antigens. Similar and identical T-cell receptor sequences were observed in the initial biopsy and the expanded T-cell population. Immunotherapy treatment failed to shrink the tumor, which had undergone an epithelial to mesenchymal transition prior to therapy. A warm autopsy of the metastatic lung tumor permitted an extensive analysis of tumor heterogeneity over five years of treatment and surgery. This detailed analysis of the clinical descriptions, imaging, pathology, molecular and cellular evolution of the tumors, treatments, and responses to chemotherapy, targeted therapies, and immunotherapies, as well as attempts at the development of personalized medical treatments for a single patient should provide a valuable guide to future directions in cancer treatment.

3 Article Surfaceome profiling enables isolation of cancer-specific exosomal cargo in liquid biopsies from pancreatic cancer patients. 2018

Castillo, J / Bernard, V / San Lucas, F A / Allenson, K / Capello, M / Kim, D U / Gascoyne, P / Mulu, F C / Stephens, B M / Huang, J / Wang, H / Momin, A A / Jacamo, R O / Katz, M / Wolff, R / Javle, M / Varadhachary, G / Wistuba, I I / Hanash, S / Maitra, A / Alvarez, H. ·Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. · The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer UTHealth Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. · Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. · Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. · ContinuumDx, Houston, USA. · McCombs Institute for the Early Detection and Treatment of Cancer, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. · Department of Leukemia, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. · Department of Translational Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. · Department of Sheikh Ahmed Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #29045505.

ABSTRACT: Background: Detection of circulating tumor DNA can be limited due to their relative scarcity in circulation, particularly while patients are actively undergoing therapy. Exosomes provide a vehicle through which cancer-specific material can be enriched from the compendium of circulating non-neoplastic tissue-derived nucleic acids. We carried out a comprehensive profiling of the pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) exosomal 'surfaceome' in order to identify surface proteins that will render liquid biopsies amenable to cancer-derived exosome enrichment for downstream molecular profiling. Patients and methods: Surface exosomal proteins were profiled in 13 human PDAC and 2 non-neoplastic cell lines by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 173 prospectively collected blood samples from 103 PDAC patients underwent exosome isolation. Droplet digital PCR was used on 74 patients (136 total exosome samples) to determine baseline KRAS mutation call rates while patients were on therapy. PDAC-specific exosome capture was then carried out on additional 29 patients (37 samples) using an antibody cocktail directed against selected proteins, followed by droplet digital PCR analysis. Exosomal DNA in a PDAC patient resistant to therapy were profiled using a molecular barcoded, targeted sequencing panel to determine the utility of enriched nucleic acid material for comprehensive molecular analysis. Results: Proteomic analysis of the exosome 'surfaceome' revealed multiple PDAC-specific biomarker candidates: CLDN4, EPCAM, CD151, LGALS3BP, HIST2H2BE, and HIST2H2BF. KRAS mutations in total exosomes were detected in 44.1% of patients undergoing active therapy compared with 73.0% following exosome capture using the selected biomarkers. Enrichment of exosomal cargo was amenable to molecular profiling, elucidating a putative mechanism of resistance to PARP inhibitor therapy in a patient harboring a BRCA2 mutation. Conclusion: Exosomes provide unique opportunities in the context of liquid biopsies for enrichment of tumor-specific material in circulation. We present a comprehensive surfaceome characterization of PDAC exosomes which allows for capture and molecular profiling of tumor-derived DNA.

4 Article Prognostic Significance of Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes in Patients With Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy. 2017

Nejati, Reza / Goldstein, Jennifer B / Halperin, Daniel M / Wang, Hua / Hejazi, Nazila / Rashid, Asif / Katz, Matthew H / Lee, Jeffrey E / Fleming, Jason B / Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime / Blando, Jorge / Wistuba, Ignacio I / Maitra, Anirban / Wolff, Robert A / Varadhachary, Gauri R / Wang, Huamin. ·From the Departments of *Pathology, †Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, ‡Surgical Oncology, and §Translational Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #28902789.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and their prognostic value in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) after neoadjuvant therapy. METHODS: Intratumoral CD4, CD8, and FOXP3 lymphocytes were examined by immunohistochemistry using a computer-assisted quantitative analysis in 136 PDAC patients who received neoadjuvant therapy and pancreaticoduodenectomy. The results were correlated with clinicopathological parameters and survival. RESULTS: High CD4 TILs in treated PDAC were associated with high CD8 TILs (P = 0.003), differentiation (P = 0.04), and a lower frequency of recurrence (P = 0.02). Patients with high CD4 TILs had longer disease-free survival and overall survival (OS) than did patients with low CD4 TILs (P < 0.01). The median OS of patients with a high CD8/FOXP3 lymphocyte ratio (39.5 [standard deviation, 6.1] months) was longer than that of patients with a low CD8/FOXP3 lymphocyte ratio (28.3 [standard deviation, 2.3] months; P = 0.01). In multivariate analysis, high CD4 TILs were an independent prognostic factor for disease-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.49; 95% confidence interval, 0.30-0.81; P = 0.005) and OS (hazard ratio, 0.54; 95% confidence interval, 0.33-0.89; P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: High level of CD4 lymphocytes is associated with tumor differentiation and lower recurrence and is an independent prognostic factor for survival in PDAC patients treated with neoadjuvant therapy.

5 Article High prevalence of mutant KRAS in circulating exosome-derived DNA from early-stage pancreatic cancer patients. 2017

Allenson, K / Castillo, J / San Lucas, F A / Scelo, G / Kim, D U / Bernard, V / Davis, G / Kumar, T / Katz, M / Overman, M J / Foretova, L / Fabianova, E / Holcatova, I / Janout, V / Meric-Bernstam, F / Gascoyne, P / Wistuba, I / Varadhachary, G / Brennan, P / Hanash, S / Li, D / Maitra, A / Alvarez, H. ·Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. · Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. · Department of Translational Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. · Sheikh Ahmed Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. · Genetic Epidemiology Group International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. · Department of GI Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Brno, Czech Republic. · Regional Authority of Public Health in Banska Bystrica, Banska Bystrica, Slovakia. · Institute of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Palacky University of Medicine, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ostrava, Ostrava, Czech Republic. · Department of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics and the Institute for Personalized Cancer Therapy, Houston, USA. · Section of Experimental Pathology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA · Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #28104621.

ABSTRACT: Background: Exosomes arise from viable cancer cells and may reflect a different biology than circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) shed from dying tissues. We compare exosome-derived DNA (exoDNA) to cfDNA in liquid biopsies of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Patients and methods: Patient samples were obtained between 2003 and 2010, with clinically annotated follow up to 2015. Droplet digital PCR was performed on exoDNA and cfDNA for sensitive detection of KRAS mutants at codons 12/13. A cumulative series of 263 individuals were studied, including a discovery cohort of 142 individuals: 68 PDAC patients of all stages; 20 PDAC patients initially staged with localized disease, with blood drawn after resection for curative intent; and 54 age-matched healthy controls. A validation cohort of 121 individuals (39 cancer patients and 82 healthy controls) was studied to validate KRAS detection rates in early-stage PDAC patients. Primary outcome was circulating KRAS status as detected by droplet digital PCR. Secondary outcomes were disease-free and overall survival. Results: KRAS mutations in exoDNA, were identified in 7.4%, 66.7%, 80%, and 85% of age-matched controls, localized, locally advanced, and metastatic PDAC patients, respectively. Comparatively, mutant KRAS cfDNA was detected in 14.8%, 45.5%, 30.8%, and 57.9% of these individuals. Higher exoKRAS MAFs were associated with decreased disease-free survival in patients with localized disease. In the validation cohort, mutant KRAS exoDNA was detected in 43.6% of early-stage PDAC patients and 20% of healthy controls. Conclusions: Exosomes are a distinct source of tumor DNA that may be complementary to other liquid biopsy DNA sources. A higher percentage of patients with localized PDAC exhibited detectable KRAS mutations in exoDNA than previously reported for cfDNA. A substantial minority of healthy samples demonstrated mutant KRAS in circulation, dictating careful consideration and application of liquid biopsy findings, which may limit its utility as a broad cancer-screening method.

6 Article Minimally invasive genomic and transcriptomic profiling of visceral cancers by next-generation sequencing of circulating exosomes. 2016

San Lucas, F A / Allenson, K / Bernard, V / Castillo, J / Kim, D U / Ellis, K / Ehli, E A / Davies, G E / Petersen, J L / Li, D / Wolff, R / Katz, M / Varadhachary, G / Wistuba, I / Maitra, A / Alvarez, H. ·Department of Translational Molecular Pathology Department of Pathology. · Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston. · Department of Pathology The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston. · Department of Pathology. · Avera Institute for Human Genetics, Sioux Falls. · Department of Gastrointestinal (GI) Medical Oncology. · Department of Translational Molecular Pathology. · Department of Translational Molecular Pathology Department of Pathology Sheikh Ahmed Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA amaitra@mdanderson.org. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #26681674.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The ability to perform comprehensive profiling of cancers at high resolution is essential for precision medicine. Liquid biopsies using shed exosomes provide high-quality nucleic acids to obtain molecular characterization, which may be especially useful for visceral cancers that are not amenable to routine biopsies. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We isolated shed exosomes in biofluids from three patients with pancreaticobiliary cancers (two pancreatic, one ampullary). We performed comprehensive profiling of exoDNA and exoRNA by whole genome, exome and transcriptome sequencing using the Illumina HiSeq 2500 sequencer. We assessed the feasibility of calling copy number events, detecting mutational signatures and identifying potentially actionable mutations in exoDNA sequencing data, as well as expressed point mutations and gene fusions in exoRNA sequencing data. RESULTS: Whole-exome sequencing resulted in 95%-99% of the target regions covered at a mean depth of 133-490×. Genome-wide copy number profiles, and high estimates of tumor fractions (ranging from 56% to 82%), suggest robust representation of the tumor DNA within the shed exosomal compartment. Multiple actionable mutations, including alterations in NOTCH1 and BRCA2, were found in patient exoDNA samples. Further, RNA sequencing of shed exosomes identified the presence of expressed fusion genes, representing an avenue for elucidation of tumor neoantigens. CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated high-resolution profiling of the genomic and transcriptomic landscapes of visceral cancers. A wide range of cancer-derived biomarkers could be detected within the nucleic acid cargo of shed exosomes, including copy number profiles, point mutations, insertions, deletions, gene fusions and mutational signatures. Liquid biopsies using shed exosomes has the potential to be used as a clinical tool for cancer diagnosis, therapeutic stratification and treatment monitoring, precluding the need for direct tumor sampling.

7 Article RSPO2 Enhances Canonical Wnt Signaling to Confer Stemness-Associated Traits to Susceptible Pancreatic Cancer Cells. 2015

Ilmer, Matthias / Boiles, Alejandro Recio / Regel, Ivonne / Yokoi, Kenji / Michalski, Christoph W / Wistuba, Ignacio I / Rodriguez, Jaime / Alt, Eckhard / Vykoukal, Jody. ·Department of Translational Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. matthias.ilmer@googlemail.com jody@mdanderson.org. · Department of Translational Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · Department of Surgery, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technical University Munich, Munich, Germany. · Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, Texas. · Department of Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Medicine, Tulane University Health Science Center, New Orleans, Lousiana. ·Cancer Res · Pubmed #25769727.

ABSTRACT: Cancer stem cells (CSC) present a formidable clinical challenge by escaping therapeutic intervention and seeding tumors through processes that remain incompletely understood. Here, we describe small subpopulations of pancreatic cancer cells with high intrinsic Wnt activity (Wnt(high)) that possess properties indicative of CSCs, including drug resistance and tumor-initiating capacity, whereas cell populations with negligible Wnt activity (Wnt(low)) preferentially express markers of differentiation. Spontaneous response to extrinsic Wnt signals induces signaling networks comprising ERK1/2 and epithelial-mesenchymal transition that subsequently confer cancer stemness traits to susceptible cells. Wnt enhancer R-Spondin 2 (RSPO2) seems to play a prominent upstream role in regulating this interplay. In this context, Wnt(high) cells were more likely to give rise to Wnt(high) progeny, tended to be more metastatic, and revealed higher levels of RSPO2 expression. Our studies reveal adaptive aspects of pancreatic cancer stemness arising from driver populations of CSCs that misappropriate functional and responsive elements of archetypical self-renewal pathways. Blocking such stemness-promoting pathways in conjunction with established chemotherapy could provide means to disrupt dynamic CSC process and present novel therapeutic targets and strategies.