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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Gavin W. Wilson
Based on 3 articles published since 2009
(Why 3 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Gavin Wilson wrote the following 3 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Association of Distinct Mutational Signatures With Correlates of Increased Immune Activity in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma. 2017

Connor, Ashton A / Denroche, Robert E / Jang, Gun Ho / Timms, Lee / Kalimuthu, Sangeetha N / Selander, Iris / McPherson, Treasa / Wilson, Gavin W / Chan-Seng-Yue, Michelle A / Borozan, Ivan / Ferretti, Vincent / Grant, Robert C / Lungu, Ilinca M / Costello, Eithne / Greenhalf, William / Palmer, Daniel / Ghaneh, Paula / Neoptolemos, John P / Buchler, Markus / Petersen, Gloria / Thayer, Sarah / Hollingsworth, Michael A / Sherker, Alana / Durocher, Daniel / Dhani, Neesha / Hedley, David / Serra, Stefano / Pollett, Aaron / Roehrl, Michael H A / Bavi, Prashant / Bartlett, John M S / Cleary, Sean / Wilson, Julie M / Alexandrov, Ludmil B / Moore, Malcolm / Wouters, Bradly G / McPherson, John D / Notta, Faiyaz / Stein, Lincoln D / Gallinger, Steven. ·PanCuRx Translational Research Initiative, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada2Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada3Hepatobiliary/Pancreatic Surgical Oncology Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · PanCuRx Translational Research Initiative, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada4Informatics and Bio-computing Program, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · PanCuRx Translational Research Initiative, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada4Informatics and Bio-computing Program, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada5Department of Statistical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · PanCuRx Translational Research Initiative, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada6Genome Technologies Program, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · PanCuRx Translational Research Initiative, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Informatics and Bio-computing Program, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · PanCuRx Translational Research Initiative, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada2Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Transformative Pathology, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · University of Liverpool, Liverpool, England. · Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of Nebraska Medical Centre, Omaha, Nebraska. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada13Molecular Genetics Department, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Division of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Hepatobiliary/Pancreatic Surgical Oncology Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada15Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · PanCuRx Translational Research Initiative, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada15Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada16Department of Pathology, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada17Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada18BioSpecimen Sciences Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · PanCuRx Translational Research Initiative, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada3Hepatobiliary/Pancreatic Surgical Oncology Program, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Theoretical Biology and Biophysics (T-6), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico20Center for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. · Department of Pathology, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Genome Technologies Program, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada17Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Informatics and Bio-computing Program, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada13Molecular Genetics Department, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ·JAMA Oncol · Pubmed #27768182.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Outcomes for patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remain poor. Advances in next-generation sequencing provide a route to therapeutic approaches, and integrating DNA and RNA analysis with clinicopathologic data may be a crucial step toward personalized treatment strategies for this disease. Objective: To classify PDAC according to distinct mutational processes, and explore their clinical significance. Design, Setting, and Participants: We performed a retrospective cohort study of resected PDAC, using cases collected between 2008 and 2015 as part of the International Cancer Genome Consortium. The discovery cohort comprised 160 PDAC cases from 154 patients (148 primary; 12 metastases) that underwent tumor enrichment prior to whole-genome and RNA sequencing. The replication cohort comprised 95 primary PDAC cases that underwent whole-genome sequencing and expression microarray on bulk biospecimens. Main Outcomes and Measures: Somatic mutations accumulate from sequence-specific processes creating signatures detectable by DNA sequencing. Using nonnegative matrix factorization, we measured the contribution of each signature to carcinogenesis, and used hierarchical clustering to subtype each cohort. We examined expression of antitumor immunity genes across subtypes to uncover biomarkers predictive of response to systemic therapies. Results: The discovery cohort was 53% male (n = 79) and had a median age of 67 (interquartile range, 58-74) years. The replication cohort was 50% male (n = 48) and had a median age of 68 (interquartile range, 60-75) years. Five predominant mutational subtypes were identified that clustered PDAC into 4 major subtypes: age related, double-strand break repair, mismatch repair, and 1 with unknown etiology (signature 8). These were replicated and validated. Signatures were faithfully propagated from primaries to matched metastases, implying their stability during carcinogenesis. Twelve of 27 (45%) double-strand break repair cases lacked germline or somatic events in canonical homologous recombination genes-BRCA1, BRCA2, or PALB2. Double-strand break repair and mismatch repair subtypes were associated with increased expression of antitumor immunity, including activation of CD8-positive T lymphocytes (GZMA and PRF1) and overexpression of regulatory molecules (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4, programmed cell death 1, and indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1), corresponding to higher frequency of somatic mutations and tumor-specific neoantigens. Conclusions and Relevance: Signature-based subtyping may guide personalized therapy of PDAC in the context of biomarker-driven prospective trials.

2 Article A renewed model of pancreatic cancer evolution based on genomic rearrangement patterns. 2016

Notta, Faiyaz / Chan-Seng-Yue, Michelle / Lemire, Mathieu / Li, Yilong / Wilson, Gavin W / Connor, Ashton A / Denroche, Robert E / Liang, Sheng-Ben / Brown, Andrew M K / Kim, Jaeseung C / Wang, Tao / Simpson, Jared T / Beck, Timothy / Borgida, Ayelet / Buchner, Nicholas / Chadwick, Dianne / Hafezi-Bakhtiari, Sara / Dick, John E / Heisler, Lawrence / Hollingsworth, Michael A / Ibrahimov, Emin / Jang, Gun Ho / Johns, Jeremy / Jorgensen, Lars G T / Law, Calvin / Ludkovski, Olga / Lungu, Ilinca / Ng, Karen / Pasternack, Danielle / Petersen, Gloria M / Shlush, Liran I / Timms, Lee / Tsao, Ming-Sound / Wilson, Julie M / Yung, Christina K / Zogopoulos, George / Bartlett, John M S / Alexandrov, Ludmil B / Real, Francisco X / Cleary, Sean P / Roehrl, Michael H / McPherson, John D / Stein, Lincoln D / Hudson, Thomas J / Campbell, Peter J / Gallinger, Steven. ·Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario M5G 0A3, Canada. · Cancer Genome Project, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton CB10 1SA, UK. · UHN Program in BioSpecimen Sciences, Department of Pathology, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4, Canada. · Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7, Canada. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada. · Department of Computer Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4, Canada. · Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68198, USA. · Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada. · Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network (UHN), Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada. · Division of Surgical Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. · Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Québec, Canada, H3H 2L9. · Theoretical Biology and Biophysics (T-6) and Center for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA, 87545. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid 28029, Spain. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X5, Canada. · Department of Surgery, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4, Canada. · Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY, UK. ·Nature · Pubmed #27732578.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer, a highly aggressive tumour type with uniformly poor prognosis, exemplifies the classically held view of stepwise cancer development. The current model of tumorigenesis, based on analyses of precursor lesions, termed pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasm (PanINs) lesions, makes two predictions: first, that pancreatic cancer develops through a particular sequence of genetic alterations (KRAS, followed by CDKN2A, then TP53 and SMAD4); and second, that the evolutionary trajectory of pancreatic cancer progression is gradual because each alteration is acquired independently. A shortcoming of this model is that clonally expanded precursor lesions do not always belong to the tumour lineage, indicating that the evolutionary trajectory of the tumour lineage and precursor lesions can be divergent. This prevailing model of tumorigenesis has contributed to the clinical notion that pancreatic cancer evolves slowly and presents at a late stage. However, the propensity for this disease to rapidly metastasize and the inability to improve patient outcomes, despite efforts aimed at early detection, suggest that pancreatic cancer progression is not gradual. Here, using newly developed informatics tools, we tracked changes in DNA copy number and their associated rearrangements in tumour-enriched genomes and found that pancreatic cancer tumorigenesis is neither gradual nor follows the accepted mutation order. Two-thirds of tumours harbour complex rearrangement patterns associated with mitotic errors, consistent with punctuated equilibrium as the principal evolutionary trajectory. In a subset of cases, the consequence of such errors is the simultaneous, rather than sequential, knockout of canonical preneoplastic genetic drivers that are likely to set-off invasive cancer growth. These findings challenge the current progression model of pancreatic cancer and provide insights into the mutational processes that give rise to these aggressive tumours.

3 Article Integrated genomic, transcriptomic, and RNA-interference analysis of genes in somatic copy number gains in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2013

Samuel, Nardin / Sayad, Azin / Wilson, Gavin / Lemire, Mathieu / Brown, Kevin R / Muthuswamy, Lakshmi / Hudson, Thomas J / Moffat, Jason. ·Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #23851435.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: This study used an integrated analysis of copy number, gene expression, and RNA interference screens for identification of putative driver genes harbored in somatic copy number gains in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). METHODS: Somatic copy number gain data on 60 PDAC genomes were extracted from public data sets to identify genomic loci that are recurrently gained. Array-based data from a panel of 29 human PDAC cell lines were used to quantify associations between copy number and gene expression for the set of genes found in somatic copy number gains. The most highly correlated genes were assessed in a compendium of pooled short hairpin RNA screens on 27 of the same human PDAC cell lines. RESULTS: A catalog of 710 protein-coding and 46 RNA genes mapping to 20 recurrently gained genomic loci were identified. The gene set was further refined through stringent integration of copy number, gene expression, and RNA interference screening data to uncover 34 candidate driver genes. CONCLUSIONS: Among the candidate genes from the integrative analysis, ECT2 was found to have significantly higher essentiality in specific PDAC cell lines with genomic gains at the 3q26.3 locus, which harbors this gene, suggesting that ECT2 may play an oncogenic role in the PDAC neoplastic process.