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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Matthew John Weiss
Based on 103 articles published since 2010
(Why 103 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, M. Weiss wrote the following 103 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5
1 Review Lessons learned from 29 lymphoepithelial cysts of the pancreas: institutional experience and review of the literature. 2018

Groot, Vincent P / Thakker, Sameer S / Gemenetzis, Georgios / Noë, Michaël / Javed, Ammar A / Burkhart, Richard A / Noveiry, Behnoud B / Cameron, John L / Weiss, Matthew J / VandenBussche, Christopher J / Fishman, Elliot K / Hruban, Ralph H / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Lennon, Anne Marie / He, Jin. ·Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; Department of Surgery, UMC Utrecht Cancer Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Radiology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; Department of Gastroenterology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; Department of Radiology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address: jhe11@jhmi.edu. ·HPB (Oxford) · Pubmed #29530477.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Lymphoepithelial cysts (LECs) are rare pancreatic cystic lesions. Since LECs are benign, preoperative diagnosis is important to differentiate from a cystic neoplasm and avoid unnecessary surgery. The aim of this study was to identify clinical, radiographic and cytopathologic features associated with LECs. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed of patients diagnosed with LEC between 1995 and 2017 at our hospital. Clinicopathologic and radiographic imaging features were documented. RESULTS: Of 29 patients with pancreatic LEC, 22 underwent surgical resection. The majority were male (n = 24) with a median age of 55 years (range, 21-74). During the evaluation, all patients underwent a CT, with endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy (n = 22) and/or MRI/MRCP (n = 11) performed in a smaller number of patients. A combination of exophytic tumor growth on imaging and the presence of specific cytomorphologic features on the EUS-FNA cytology biopsy led to the correct diagnosis of LEC and prevention of unnecessary surgery in 7 patients. DISCUSSION: Differentiating LECs from premalignant pancreatic cystic neoplasms remains difficult. Findings of an exophytic growth pattern of the lesion on abdominal imaging and the presence of specific cytomorphologic features in the EUS-FNA biopsy could help clinicians diagnose LEC preoperatively.

2 Review Pancreaticoduodenectomy with en bloc vein resection for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: a case series without venous reconstruction. 2018

Gage, Michele M / Reames, Bradley N / Ejaz, Aslam / Sham, Johnathan / Fishman, Elliot K / Weiss, Matthew J / Wolfgang, Christopher L / He, Jin. ·Department of Surgery,Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Surgery,Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA. jhe11@jhmi.edu. ·Chin Clin Oncol · Pubmed #29486566.

ABSTRACT: Resection with clean margin (R0 resection) is associated with better survival in patients with pancreatic cancer. Over the last decade, advancements in preoperative chemotherapy and radiation therapy in pancreatic cancer have led to expansion of indications for surgical resection. Current guidelines define pancreatic cancer with unreconstructable vascular involvement as locally advanced, or surgically unresectable. We present our experience in managing patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer with a very unique series of patients who achieved R0 resection despite "unresectable" vascular involvement. Additionally, we review current guidelines, the ability to predict venous resection by imaging, outcomes after venous resection and reconstruction, published patency rates of venous reconstructions, and potential future implications of this novel technique.

3 Review Geographical variation and trends in outcomes of laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy with or without splenic vessel preservation: A meta-analysis. 2017

Yongfei, Hua / Javed, Ammar A / Burkhart, Richard / Peters, Niek A / Hasanain, Alina / Weiss, Matthew J / Wolfgang, Christopher L / He, Jin. ·Department of Surgery, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA; Department of Surgery, Lihuili Eastern Hospital, Ningbo, China. · Department of Surgery, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Surgery, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA; University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address: jhe11@jhmi.edu. ·Int J Surg · Pubmed #28735894.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Distal pancreatectomy (DP) is performed to treat tumors of the pancreatic body and tail. Traditionally, splenectomy is performed with a DP, however, laparoscopic spleen-preserving DP (SPDP) using Warshaw's (splenic vessels ligation) or Kimura's (splenic vessels preservation) techniques have been reported. The clinical benefits of using either technique remain unclear. In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis to compare the clinical outcomes of patients undergoing Warshaw's and Kimura SPDP. This is the first study to evaluate the geographical variation in outcomes of Warshaw's and Kimura SPDP. METHODS: Databases of PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane library were used to identify studies reporting Warshaw's and Kimura SPDP. Clinical outcomes were compared. Pooled odds risk and weighted mean difference with 95% confidence interval were calculated using random effect models. RESULTS: Fourteen non-randomized controlled studies involving 945 patients met our selection criteria. 301 (31.9%) patients underwent Warshaw's SPDP; 644 (68.1%) underwent Kimura SPDP. Compared to Warshaw's SPDP, patients undergoing Kimura SPDP had a lower incidence of post-operative complications including spleen infarction (OR = 9.64, 95% CI = 5.79 to 16.05, P < 0.001) and gastric varices (OR = 11.88, 95% CI = 5.11 to 27.66, P < 0.001). The length of surgery was significantly shorter for Warshaw's SPDP (WMD = -18.12, 95%CI = -26.52 to -9.72, p < 0.001). Decreased blood loss was reported for patients undergoing Warshaw's SPDP (WMD = -59.72, 95%CI = -102.01 to -17.43, p = 0.006). There were no differences between the two groups' rates of conversion to an open procedure (P = 0.35), postoperative pancreatic fistula (P = 0.71), need for reoperation (P = 0.25), and length of hospital stay (P = 0.38). CONCLUSION: Both Warshaw's and Kimura are safe SPDP techniques. These data suggest Kimura SPDP is the preferred technique due to less risk of splenic infarct and gastric varices. Despite evidence of regional variation in volume performed (between Kimura and Warshaw's), there are no statistically significant differences in outcomes between these techniques.

4 Review Tumor-Vessel Relationships in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma at Multidetector CT: Different Classification Systems and Their Influence on Treatment Planning. 2017

Zaky, Ahmed M / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Weiss, Matthew J / Javed, Ammar A / Fishman, Elliot K / Zaheer, Atif. ·From the Department of Surgery (A.M.Z., C.L.W., M.J.W., A.A.J.), the Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science (E.K.F., A.Z.), and the Pancreatitis Center (A.Z.), Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, 601 N Caroline St, JHOC 3235 A, Baltimore, MD 21231. ·Radiographics · Pubmed #27885893.

ABSTRACT: Treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains a challenge, given its propensity for early systemic spread and growth into the adjacent vital vascular structures. With the advent of newer surgical techniques and chemoradiation therapies, multidetector computed tomography (CT) plays a crucial role in the identification of patients with borderline resectable disease who may benefit from such treatments. Stage III PDAC is divided into two categories-locally advanced, defined by arterial encasement or nonreconstructible portovenous axis involvement; and borderline resectable, defined by limited arterial involvement and/or reconstructible portovenous involvement. A consensus definition for stage III borderline resectable PDAC has been proposed by the Americas Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association, the Society of Surgical Oncology, and the Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract and has gained widespread use. Evaluation of borderline resectable disease involves the identification of the circumferential and longitudinal relationship of the tumor with its neighboring vessels, markers of vascular invasion, and aberrant anatomic structures that alter the surgical approach. Furthermore, the use of template-based radiology reporting may increase the objectivity of the evaluation and mandate the provision of all of the key descriptors required for a comprehensive evaluation of the disease. In this review, the staging of PDAC at multidetector CT is described, with reference to the evaluation of the tumor-vessel interface as it guides treatment planning, along with a discussion of the key descriptors of PDAC at multidetector CT and their importance. Examples are provided of the imaging findings of borderline resectable disease and different surgical approaches, along with a discussion on the importance of standardized terminology and template-based reporting.

5 Review Surgery for oligometastasis of pancreatic cancer. 2015

Lu, Fengchun / Poruk, Katherine E / Weiss, Matthew J. ·1 Department of General Surgery, Union Hospital, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350001, China ; 2 Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. ·Chin J Cancer Res · Pubmed #26361405.

ABSTRACT: The incidence of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has steadily increased over the past several decades. The majority of PDAC patients will present with distant metastases, limiting surgical management in this population. Hepatectomy and pulmonary metastasectomy (PM) has been well established for colorectal cancer patients with isolated, resectable hepatic or pulmonary metastatic disease. Recent advancements in effective systemic therapy for PDAC have led to the selection of certain patients where metastectomy may be potentially indicated. However, the indication for resection of oligometastases in PDAC is not well defined. This review will discuss the current literature on the surgical management of metastatic disease for PDAC with a specific focus on surgical resection for isolated hepatic and pulmonary metastases.

6 Review Postoperative Omental Infarct After Distal Pancreatectomy: Appearance, Etiology Management, and Review of Literature. 2015

Javed, Ammar A / Bagante, Fabio / Hruban, Ralph H / Weiss, Matthew J / Makary, Martin A / Hirose, Kenzo / Cameron, John L / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Fishman, Elliot K. ·Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 North Wolfe St, Halsted 608, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. · Department of Surgery, Chirurgia Generale e Epatobiliare, G.B. Rossi University Hospital,, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. · Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. efishman@jhmi.edu. ·J Gastrointest Surg · Pubmed #26302877.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The clinico-radiological characteristics and the natural history of postoperative omental infarct (OI) in patients who underwent distal pancreatectomy (DP) and splenectomy have not been defined. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twelve patients who underwent DP over a period of 2 years and were postoperatively diagnosed with OI based on computed tomography (CT) findings were identified. RESULTS: A total of 12 patients were diagnosed with an OI based on their postoperative imaging. Seven (58.3 %) patients had previously undergone laparoscopic DP, one (8.3 %) had undergone a robotic DP, and in one (8.3 %), a laparoscopic DP was converted to an open procedure. The remaining three (25.1 %) were treated with open DP. In five (41.6 %) patients, the diagnosis of OI was made during routine follow-up. One patient underwent surgical resection of OI, and two had drains placed in the mass. Nine patients were managed conservatively. During the study period, on review of CT imaging, the minimum prevalence of postoperative OI after DP was found to be 22.8 %. A review of literature identified nine articles that reported a total of 34 patients who were diagnosed with OI after abdominal surgery. CONCLUSION: The management of an asymptomatic postoperative OI should be conservative while an early invasive intervention should be performed in patients who are symptomatic or have infected OI.

7 Review Stage III pancreatic cancer and the role of irreversible electroporation. 2015

Al Efishat, Mohammad / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Weiss, Matthew J. ·Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. · Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA mweiss5@jhmi.edu. ·BMJ · Pubmed #25787829.

ABSTRACT: About a third of patients with pancreatic cancer present with locally advanced disease that is not amenable to resection. Because these patients have localized disease, conventional ablative therapies (thermal ablation and cryoablation) have the potential to be beneficial, but their use is inherently limited in the pancreas. These limitations could be overcome by irreversible electroporation-a novel, non-thermal ablative method that is gaining popularity for the treatment of many soft tissue tumors, including those of the pancreas. This review summarizes the status of this technique in the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Most of the evidence on efficacy and safety is based on non-randomized prospective series, which show that irreversible electroporation may improve overall survival and pain control in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. As experience with this procedure increases, randomized controlled trials are needed to document its efficacy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer more precisely.

8 Review The current state of surgery for pancreatic cancer. 2015

Poruk, K E / Weiss, M J. ·Department of Surgery The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA - mweiss5@jhmi.edu. ·Minerva Gastroenterol Dietol · Pubmed #25651834.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States, with a dismal 5-year survival of only 6% for all stages. Surgical resection offers the best opportunity for prolonged survival at this time, but is limited to patients with locally resectable tumors and no distant metastases. Although only 10-20% of patients present with early stage disease are amenable to surgical resection, remarkable advancements have been made over the past several decades leading to improved morbidity and mortality after pancreatic resection. This article will review the current state of pancreatic surgery including its role in the multidisciplinary approach to pancreatic cancer treatment, advances and controversies in surgical technique, and the limitations of surgical therapy that will need to be addressed in the future to improve survival for patients with pancreatic cancer.

9 Review Irreversible electroporation: a novel therapy for stage III pancreatic cancer. 2014

Weiss, Matthew J / Wolfgang, Christopher L. · ·Adv Surg · Pubmed #25293620.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Review The early detection of pancreatic cancer: what will it take to diagnose and treat curable pancreatic neoplasia? 2014

Lennon, Anne Marie / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Canto, Marcia Irene / Klein, Alison P / Herman, Joseph M / Goggins, Michael / Fishman, Elliot K / Kamel, Ihab / Weiss, Matthew J / Diaz, Luis A / Papadopoulos, Nickolas / Kinzler, Kenneth W / Vogelstein, Bert / Hruban, Ralph H. ·Authors' Affiliations: Departments of Medicine; Surgery; · Surgery; Pathology; Oncology; · Authors' Affiliations: Departments of Medicine; · Pathology; Oncology; Department of Epidemiology, the Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. · Oncology; Radiation Oncology; and. · Authors' Affiliations: Departments of Medicine; Pathology; Oncology; · Radiology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; and. · Surgery; · Oncology; · Pathology; Oncology; · Pathology; Oncology; rhruban@jhmi.edu. ·Cancer Res · Pubmed #24924775.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is the deadliest of all solid malignancies. Early detection offers the best hope for a cure, but characteristics of this disease, such as the lack of early clinical symptoms, make the early detection difficult. Recent genetic mapping of the molecular evolution of pancreatic cancer suggests that a large window of opportunity exists for the early detection of pancreatic neoplasia, and developments in cancer genetics offer new, potentially highly specific approaches for screening of curable pancreatic neoplasia. We review the challenges of screening for early pancreatic neoplasia, as well as opportunities presented by incorporating molecular genetics into these efforts.

11 Review Management of borderline and locally advanced pancreatic cancer: where do we stand? 2014

He, Jin / Page, Andrew J / Weiss, Matthew / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Herman, Joseph M / Pawlik, Timothy M. ·Jin He, Andrew J Page, Matthew Weiss, Christopher L Wolfgang, Timothy M Pawlik, Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD 21287, United States. ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #24605025.

ABSTRACT: Many patients with pancreas cancer present with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). The principle tools used for diagnosis and staging of LAPC include endoscopic ultrasound, axial imaging with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and diagnostic laparoscopy. The definition of resectability has historically been vague, as there is considerable debate and controversy as to the definition of LAPC. For the patient with LAPC, there is some level of involvement of the surrounding vascular structures, which include the superior mesenteric artery, celiac axis, hepatic artery, superior mesenteric vein, or portal vein. When feasible, most surgeons would recommend possible surgical resection for patients with borderline LAPC, with the goal of an R0 resection. For initially unresectable LAPC, neoadjuvant should be strongly considered. Specifically, these patients should be offered neoadjuvant therapy, and the tumor should be assessed for possible response and eventual resection. The efficacy of neoadjuvant therapy with this approach as a bridge to potential curative resection is broad, ranging from 3%-79%. The different modalities of neoadjuvant therapy include single or multi-agent chemotherapy combined with radiation, chemotherapy alone, and chemotherapy followed by chemotherapy with radiation. This review focuses on patients with LAPC and addresses recent advances and controversies in the field.

12 Clinical Trial Mutations in the pancreatic secretory enzymes 2018

Tamura, Koji / Yu, Jun / Hata, Tatsuo / Suenaga, Masaya / Shindo, Koji / Abe, Toshiya / MacGregor-Das, Anne / Borges, Michael / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Weiss, Matthew J / He, Jin / Canto, Marcia Irene / Petersen, Gloria M / Gallinger, Steven / Syngal, Sapna / Brand, Randall E / Rustgi, Anil / Olson, Sara H / Stoffel, Elena / Cote, Michele L / Zogopoulos, George / Potash, James B / Goes, Fernando S / McCombie, Richard W / Zandi, Peter P / Pirooznia, Mehdi / Kramer, Melissa / Parla, Jennifer / Eshleman, James R / Roberts, Nicholas J / Hruban, Ralph H / Klein, Alison Patricia / Goggins, Michael. ·Department of Pathology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205. · Department of Surgery, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205. · Department of Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205. · The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205. · Department of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205. · Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905. · Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1X5. · Population Sciences Division, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02215. · Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213. · Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104. · Department of Genetics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104. · Pancreatic Cancer Translational Center of Excellence, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104. · Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10017. · Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109. · Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201. · The Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada H3H 2R9. · The Goodman Cancer Research Centre, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 1A3. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD 21287. · Stanley Institute for Cognitive Genomics, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724. · InGenious Targeting Laboratory, Ronkonkoma, NY 11779. · Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205. · Department of Pathology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205; mgoggins@jhmi.edu. ·Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A · Pubmed #29669919.

ABSTRACT: To evaluate whether germline variants in genes encoding pancreatic secretory enzymes contribute to pancreatic cancer susceptibility, we sequenced the coding regions of

13 Clinical Trial Lymphocyte-Sparing Effect of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Patients With Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer. 2016

Wild, Aaron T / Herman, Joseph M / Dholakia, Avani S / Moningi, Shalini / Lu, Yao / Rosati, Lauren M / Hacker-Prietz, Amy / Assadi, Ryan K / Saeed, Ali M / Pawlik, Timothy M / Jaffee, Elizabeth M / Laheru, Daniel A / Tran, Phuoc T / Weiss, Matthew J / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Ford, Eric / Grossman, Stuart A / Ye, Xiaobu / Ellsworth, Susannah G. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Oncology Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Medical Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. Electronic address: sbatkoy2@jhmi.edu. ·Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys · Pubmed #26867885.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Radiation-induced lymphopenia (RIL) is associated with inferior survival in patients with glioblastoma, lung cancer, and pancreatic cancer. We asked whether stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) decreases severity of RIL compared to conventional chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). METHODS AND MATERIALS: Serial total lymphocyte counts (TLCs) from patients enrolled in a prospective trial of SBRT for LAPC were compared to TLCs from an existing database of LAPC patients undergoing definitive CRT. SBRT patients received 33 Gy (6.6 Gy × 5 fractions). CRT patients received a median dose of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy × 28 fractions) with concurrent 5-fluorouracil (77%) or gemcitabine (23%) therapy. Univariate and multivariate analyses (MVA) were used to identify associations between clinical factors and post-treatment TLC and between TLC and survival. RESULTS: Thirty-two patients received SBRT and 101 received CRT. Median planning target volume (PTV) was smaller in SBRT (88.7 cm(3)) than in CRT (344.6 cm(3); P<.001); median tumor diameter was larger for SBRT (4.6 cm) than for CRT (3.6 cm; P=.01). SBRT and CRT groups had similar median baseline TLCs. One month after starting radiation, 71.7% of CRT patients had severe lymphopenia (ie, TLC <500 cells/mm(3) vs 13.8% of SBRT patients; P<.001). At 2 months, 46.0% of CRT patients remained severely lymphopenic compared with 13.6% of SBRT patients (P=.007). MVA demonstrated that treatment technique and baseline TLCs were significantly associated with post-treatment TLC at 1 but not 2 months after treatment. Higher post-treatment TLC was associated with improved survival regardless of treatment technique (hazard ratio [HR] for death: 2.059; 95% confidence interval: 1.310-3.237; P=.002). CONCLUSIONS: SBRT is associated with significantly less severe RIL than CRT at 1 month in LAPC, suggesting that radiation technique affects RIL and supporting previous modeling studies. Given the association of severe RIL with survival in LAPC, further study of the effect of radiation technique on immune status is warranted.

14 Clinical Trial The Role of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience. 2015

Moningi, Shalini / Dholakia, Avani S / Raman, Siva P / Blackford, Amanda / Cameron, John L / Le, Dung T / De Jesus-Acosta, Ana M C / Hacker-Prietz, Amy / Rosati, Lauren M / Assadi, Ryan K / Dipasquale, Shirl / Pawlik, Timothy M / Zheng, Lei / Weiss, Matthew J / Laheru, Daniel A / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Herman, Joseph M. ·Department of Radiation Oncology & Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #25564157.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a promising option for patients with pancreatic cancer (PCA); however, limited data support its efficacy. This study reviews our institutional experience of SBRT in the treatment of locally advanced (LAPC) and borderline resectable (BRPC) PCA. METHODS: Charts of all PCA patients receiving SBRT at our institution from 2010 to 2014 were reviewed. Most patients received pre-SBRT chemotherapy. Primary endpoints included overall survival (OS) and local progression-free survival (LPFS). Patients received a total dose of 25-33 Gy in five fractions. RESULTS: A total of 88 patients were included in the analysis, 74 with LAPC and 14 with BRPC. The median age at diagnosis was 67.2 years, and median follow-up from date of diagnosis for LAPC and BRPC patients was 14.5 and 10.3 months, respectively. Median OS from date of diagnosis was 18.4 months (LAPC, 18.4 mo; BRPC, 14.4 mo) and median PFS was 9.8 months (95 % CI 8.0-12.3). Acute toxicity was minimal with only three patients (3.4 %) experiencing acute grade ≥3 toxicity. Late grade ≥2 gastrointestinal toxicity was seen in five patients (5.7 %). Of the 19 patients (21.6 %) who underwent surgery, 79 % were LAPC patients and 84 % had margin-negative resections. CONCLUSIONS: Chemotherapy followed by SBRT in patients with LAPC and BRPC resulted in minimal acute and late toxicity. A large proportion of patients underwent surgical resection despite limited radiographic response to therapy. Further refinements in the integration of chemotherapy, SBRT, and surgery might offer additional advancements toward optimizing patient outcomes.

15 Clinical Trial Role of a multidisciplinary clinic in the management of patients with pancreatic cysts: a single-center cohort study. 2014

Lennon, Anne Marie / Manos, Lindsey L / Hruban, Ralph H / Ali, Syed Z / Fishman, Elliot K / Kamel, Ihab R / Raman, Siva P / Zaheer, Atif / Hutfless, Susan / Salamone, Ashley / Kiswani, Vandhana / Ahuja, Nita / Makary, Martin A / Weiss, Matthew J / Hirose, Kenzo / Goggins, Michael / Wolfgang, Christopher L. ·Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Surgery, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Oncology, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #24806116.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Incidental pancreatic cysts are common, a small number of which are premalignant or malignant. Multidisciplinary care has been shown to alter management and improve outcomes in many types of cancers, but its role has not been examined in patients with pancreatic cysts. We assessed the effect of a multidisciplinary pancreatic cyst clinic (MPCC) on the diagnosis and management of patients with pancreatic cysts. METHODS: The referring institution and MPCC diagnosis and management plan were recorded. Patient were placed into one of five categories-no, low, intermediate, or high risk of malignancy within the cyst, and malignant cyst-on the basis of their diagnosis. Patients were assigned one of four management options: surveillance, surgical resection, further evaluation, or discharge with no further follow-up required. The MPCC was deemed to have altered patient care if the patient was assigned a different risk or management category after the MPCC review. RESULTS: Referring institution records were available for 262 patients (198 women; mean age 62.7 years), with data on risk category available in 138 patients and management category in 225. The most common diagnosis was branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. MPCC review altered the risk category in 11 (8.0%) of 138 patients. The management category was altered in 68 (30.2%) of 225 patients. Management was increased in 52 patients, including 22 patients who were recommended surgical resection. Management was decreased in 16 patients, including 10 who had their recommendation changed from surgery to surveillance. CONCLUSIONS: MPCC is helpful and alters the management over 30% of patients.

16 Article A systematic review of surgical resection of liver-only synchronous metastases from pancreatic cancer in the era of multiagent chemotherapy. 2020

Crippa, Stefano / Cirocchi, Roberto / Weiss, Matthew J / Partelli, Stefano / Reni, Michele / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Hackert, Thilo / Falconi, Massimo. ·Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Center, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Division of Pancreatic Surgery, Vita-Salute University, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 60, 20132, Milan, Italy. · Department of General and Oncologic Surgery, University of Perugia, St. Maria Hospital, Terni, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Center, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. falconi.massimo@hsr.it. · Division of Pancreatic Surgery, Vita-Salute University, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 60, 20132, Milan, Italy. falconi.massimo@hsr.it. ·Updates Surg · Pubmed #31997233.

ABSTRACT: Recent studies considered surgery as a treatment option for patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and synchronous liver metastases. The aim of this study was to evaluate systematically the literature on the role of surgical resection in this setting as an upfront procedure or following primary chemotherapy. A systematic search was performed of PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. Only studies that included patients with synchronous liver metastases published in the era of multiagent chemotherapy (after 2011) were considered, excluding those with lung/peritoneal metastases or metachronous liver metastases. Median overall survival (OS) was the primary outcome. Six studies with 204 patients were analyzed. 63% of patients underwent upfront pancreatic and liver resection, 35% had surgery after primary chemotherapy with strict selection criteria and 2% had an inverse approach (liver surgery first). 38 patients (18.5%) did not undergo any liver resection since metastases disappeared after chemotherapy. Postoperative mortality was low (< 2%). Median OS ranged from 7.6 to 14.5 months after upfront pancreatic/liver resection and from 34 to 56 months in those undergoing preoperative treatment. This systematic review suggests that surgical resection of pancreatic cancer with synchronous liver oligometastases is safe, and it can be associated with improved survival, providing a careful selection of patients after primary chemotherapy.

17 Article Surgical Outcomes After Pancreatic Resection of Screening-Detected Lesions in Individuals at High Risk for Developing Pancreatic Cancer. 2020

Canto, Marcia Irene / Kerdsirichairat, Tossapol / Yeo, Charles J / Hruban, Ralph H / Shin, Eun Ji / Almario, Jose Alejandro / Blackford, Amanda / Ford, Madeline / Klein, Alison P / Javed, Ammar A / Lennon, Anne Marie / Zaheer, Atif / Kamel, Ihab R / Fishman, Elliot K / Burkhart, Richard / He, Jin / Makary, Martin / Weiss, Matthew J / Schulick, Richard D / Goggins, Michael G / Wolfgang, Christopher L. ·Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Blalock 407, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. mcanto1@jhmi.edu. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Blalock 407, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. · Department of Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Oncology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Radiology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, CO, USA. ·J Gastrointest Surg · Pubmed #31197699.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Screening high-risk individuals (HRI) can detect potentially curable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and its precursors. We describe the outcomes of high-risk individuals (HRI) after pancreatic resection of screen-detected neoplasms. METHODS: Asymptomatic HRI enrolled in the prospective Cancer of the Pancreas Screening (CAPS) studies from 1998 to 2014 based on family history or germline mutations undergoing surveillance for at least 6 months were included. Pathologic diagnoses, hospital length of stay, incidence of diabetes mellitus, operative morbidity, need for repeat operation, and disease-specific mortality were determined. RESULTS: Among 354 HRI, 48 (13.6%) had 57 operations (distal pancreatectomy (31), Whipple (20), and total pancreatectomy (6)) for suspected pancreatic neoplasms presenting as a solid mass (22), cystic lesion(s) (25), or duct stricture (1). The median length of stay was 7 days (IQR 5-11). Nine of the 42 HRI underwent completion pancreatectomy for a new lesion after a median of 3.8 years (IQR 2.5-7.6). Postoperative complications developed in 17 HRI (35%); there were no perioperative deaths. New-onset diabetes mellitus after partial resection developed in 20% of HRI. Fourteen PDACs were diagnosed, 11 were screen-detected, 10 were resectable, and 9 had an R0 resection. Metachronous PDAC developed in remnant pancreata of 2 HRI. PDAC-related mortality was 4/10 (40%), with 90% 1-year survival and 60% 5-year survival, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Screening HRI can detect PDAC with a high resectability rate. Surgical treatment is associated with a relatively short length of stay and low readmission rate, acceptable morbidity, zero 90-day mortality, and significant long-term survival. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT2000089.

18 Article Surgical Resection of 78 Pancreatic Solid Pseudopapillary Tumors: a 30-Year Single Institutional Experience. 2020

Wright, Michael J / Javed, Ammar A / Saunders, Tyler / Zhu, Yayun / Burkhart, Richard A / Yu, Jun / He, Jin / Cameron, John L / Makary, Martin A / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Weiss, Matthew J. ·The John L. Cameron Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA. · The John L. Cameron Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA. mweiss5@jhmi.edu. · Pancreas Cancer Multidisciplinary Clinic, Liver Cancer Multidisciplinary Clinic, Surgical Oncology Fellowship, Miller Coulson Academy of Clinical Excellence, Johns Hopkins University, 600 N. Wolfe St. / Blalock 685, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. mweiss5@jhmi.edu. ·J Gastrointest Surg · Pubmed #31073801.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Solid pseudopapillary tumors (SPTs) are rare, benign tumors of the pancreas that present as heterogeneous masses. We sought to evaluate the short- and long-term outcomes of surgical resected SPTs. Patients managed via initial surveillance were compared to those who underwent upfront resection. METHODS: A prospectively maintained institutional database was used to identify patients who underwent surgical resection for a SPT between 1988 and 2018. Data on clinicopathological features and outcomes were collected and analyzed. RESULTS: Seventy-eight patients underwent surgical resection for SPT during the study period. The mean age was 34.0 ± 14.6 years and a majority were female (N = 67, 85.9%) and white (N = 46, 58.9%). Thirty patients (37.9%) were diagnosed incidentally. Imaging-based presumed diagnosis was SPT in 49 patients (62.8%). A majority were located in the body or tail of the pancreas (N = 47, 60.3%), and 48 patients (61.5%) underwent a distal pancreatectomy. The median tumor size was 4.0 cm (IQR, 3.0-6.0), nodal disease was present in three patients (3.9%), and R0 resection was performed in all patients. No difference was observed in clinicopathological features and outcomes between patients who were initially managed via surveillance and those who underwent upfront resection. None of the patients under surveillance had nodal disease or metastasis at the time of resection; however, one of them developed recurrence of disease 95.1 months after resection. At a median follow-up of 36.1 months (IQR, 8.1-62.1), 77 (%) patients were alive and one patient (1.3%) had a recurrence of disease at 95.1 months after resection and subsequently died due to disease. CONCLUSIONS: SPTs are rare pancreatic tumors that are diagnosed most frequently in young females. While a majority are benign and have an indolent course, malignant behavior has been observed. Surgical resection can result in exceptional outcomes.

19 Article Pancreatic Nerve Sheath Tumors: a Single Institutional Series and Systematic Review of the Literature. 2020

Javed, Ammar A / Wright, Michael J / Hasanain, Alina / Chang, Kevin / Burkhart, Richard A / Hruban, Ralph H / Thompson, Elizabeth / Fishman, Elliot K / Cameron, John L / He, Jin / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Weiss, Matthew J. ·Departments of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Departments of Pathology, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Departments of Radiology, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Departments of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA. mweiss5@jhmi.edu. · , Baltimore, USA. mweiss5@jhmi.edu. ·J Gastrointest Surg · Pubmed #30941687.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Improvement in imaging has resulted in frequent diagnosis of benign and premalignant pancreatic tumors. Pancreatic nerve sheath (PNS) tumors are one of the rarest pancreatic tumors. Literature on PNS is limited and their biology is poorly understood. Here, we report the largest series of PNS tumors to date and review the literature to evaluate the current data available on PNS tumors. METHODS: An institutional database was used to identify patients who underwent resection for PNS tumors. Clinicopathological characteristics and outcomes of these patients were reported. Furthermore, a review of literature was performed. RESULTS: From January 1994 through December 2016, seven patients underwent resection for PNS tumors. The median age was 57.7 years (IQR, 44.9-61.9) and the sex was approximately equally distributed (male = 4; 57.1%). Three (42.9%) patients were diagnosed incidentally and six (85.7%) were misdiagnosed as having other pancreatic tumors. The median tumor size was 2.1 (IQR 1.8-3.0) cm and six (85.7%) had no nodal disease. At a median follow-up of 15.5 (IQR 13.7-49.3) months, six patients were alive without evidence of disease and one patient was lost to follow-up. The literature review identified 49 studies reporting 54 patients with PNS tumors. Forty-six were misdiagnosed as having other pancreatic tumors. The median tumor size was 3.6 (range 1-20) cm, nodal disease was present in six patients (22.2%), and no patient had distant metastatic disease. At the time of last follow-up, all patients were free of disease. CONCLUSION: This is the largest single institution series on PNS tumors reported to date. These tumors are rare and are often misdiagnosed, given their radiological characteristics. PNS tumors have a benign course of disease and surgical resection results in favorable long-term outcomes.

20 Article Genetic Analysis of Small Well-differentiated Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors Identifies Subgroups With Differing Risks of Liver Metastases. 2020

Pea, Antonio / Yu, Jun / Marchionni, Luigi / Noe, Michael / Luchini, Claudio / Pulvirenti, Alessandra / de Wilde, Roeland F / Brosens, Lodewijk A / Rezaee, Neda / Javed, Ammar / Chianchiano, Peter / Gobbo, Stefano / Regi, Paolo / Salvia, Roberto / Bassi, Claudio / He, Jin / Weiss, Matthew J / Cameron, John L / Offerhaus, G Johan A / Hruban, Ralph H / Lawlor, Rita T / Scarpa, Aldo / Heaphy, Christopher M / Wood, Laura D / Wolfgang, Christopher L. ·Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Surgery, The Pancreas Institute, Verona, Italy. · Department of Oncology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Diagnostics and Public Health, Section of Pathology, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, Pederzoli Hospital, Peschiera, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Pederzoli Hospital, Peschiera, Italy. · ARC-Net Applied Research on Cancer Center, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #30339629.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the key molecular alterations in small primary pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) associated with the development of liver metastases. BACKGROUND: Well-differentiated PanNETs with small size are typically indolent; however, a limited subset metastasize to the liver. METHODS: A total of 87 small primary PanNETs (<3 cm), including 32 metastatic cases and 55 nonmetastatic cases after a 5-year follow-up, were immunolabeled for DAXX/ATRX and analyzed for alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization. A subset of these cases, 24 that metastasized and 24 that did not metastasize, were assessed by targeted next-generation sequencing and whole-genome copy number variation. RESULTS: In the entire cohort, high Ki-67 (OR 1.369; 95% CI 1.121-1.673; P = 0.002), N-stage (OR 4.568; 95% CI 1.458-14.312; P = 0.009), and ALT-positivity (OR 3.486; 95% CI 1.093-11.115; P = 0.035) were independently associated with liver metastases. In the subset assessed by next-generation sequencing and copy number variation analysis, 3 molecular subtypes with differing risks of liver metastases were identified. Group 1 (n = 15; 73% metastasized) was characterized by recurrent chromosomal gains, CN-LOH, DAXX mutations, and ALT-positivity. Group 2 (n = 19; 42% metastasized, including 5 G1 tumors) was characterized by limited copy number alterations and mutations. Group 3 (n = 14; 35% metastasized) were defined by chromosome 11 loss. CONCLUSIONS: We identified genomic patterns of small PanNETs associated with a different risk for liver metastases. Molecular alterations, such as DAXX mutations, chromosomal gains, and ALT, are associated with an increased risk of metastasis in small PanNETs. Therefore, targeted sequencing and/or ALT analysis may help in the clinical decisions for these small PanNETs.

21 Article Perioperative outcomes and long-term quality of life after total pancreatectomy. 2019

Pulvirenti, A / Pea, A / Rezaee, N / Gasparini, C / Malleo, G / Weiss, M J / Cameron, J L / Wolfgang, C L / He, J / Salvia, R. ·Unit of General and Pancreatic Surgery, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·Br J Surg · Pubmed #31282569.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Total pancreatectomy is required to treat diseases involving the entire pancreas, and is characterized by high morbidity rates and impaired long-term quality of life (QoL). To date, risk factors associated with perioperative and long-term outcomes have not been determined fully. METHODS: Data from patients undergoing total pancreatectomy between 2000 and 2014 at two high-volume centres were analysed retrospectively to assess risk factors for major surgical complications. Short Form (SF) 36, European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-PAN26 and Audit of Diabetes Dependent questionnaires, as well as an original survey were used to investigate factors influencing QoL. RESULTS: A total of 329 consecutive patients underwent total pancreatectomy in the two centres. Overall, total pancreatectomy was associated with a morbidity rate of 59·3 per cent and a 30-day mortality rate of 2·1 per cent. Age over 65 years and long duration of surgery (more than 420 min) were independently associated with major complications (at least Clavien-Dindo grade III). QoL analysis was available for 94 patients (28·6 per cent) with a median follow-up of 63 (i.q.r. 20-109) months; the most common indication for total pancreatectomy in these patients was intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (46 per cent). Both physical (PCS) and mental (MCS) component summary scores of SF-36® were lower after total pancreatectomy compared with scores for a normative population (P = 0·020 and P < 0·001 respectively). Linear regression analysis showed that young age, abdominal pain and worse perception of body image were negatively associated with the PCS, whereas diabetes, sexual satisfaction and perception of body image affected MCS. CONCLUSION: Total pancreatectomy can be performed with acceptable morbidity and mortality rates. Older patients had a higher risk of postoperative complications but reported better QoL than younger patients.

22 Article Disparities in the Use of Chemotherapy in Patients with Resected Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma. 2019

Wright, Michael J / Overton, Heidi N / Teinor, Jonathan A / Ding, Ding / Burkhart, Richard A / Cameron, John L / He, Jin / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Weiss, Matthew J / Javed, Ammar A. ·The John L. Cameron Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, 600 N. Wolfe St. / Blalock 1222A, Baltimore, MD, 2I287, USA. · The John L. Cameron Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, 600 N. Wolfe St. / Blalock 1222A, Baltimore, MD, 2I287, USA. ajaved1@jhmi.edu. ·J Gastrointest Surg · Pubmed #31270718.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Introduction of effective systemic therapies for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has demonstrated survival benefit. However, chemotherapy remains underutilized in these patients. We sought to investigate the implications of disparities on the trends in utilization of chemotherapy. METHODS: A retrospective study using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database identified patients who underwent surgical resection for PDAC from 1998 to 2014. Clinicopathologic, demographic, racial, and geographical factors were analyzed to assess associations with receipt of chemotherapy and disease-specific survival. RESULTS: A total of 15,585 patients were included in the study. A majority (N = 9953, 63.9%) received chemotherapy. Factors associated with poorer odds of receiving chemotherapy included older age (p < 0.001), African-American race (p = 0.003), and living in the Southwest region of the USA (p < 0.001). Married patients were at higher odds of receiving chemotherapy (all p < 0.001). Receipt of chemotherapy was independently associated with improved disease-specific survival (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Receipt of chemotherapy results in an improved survival in patients with resected PDAC. Demographic, racial, and geographic factors influence the rate of receipt of chemotherapy. Despite prior reports, these trends have not changed over the recent decades.

23 Article Defining and Predicting Early Recurrence in 957 Patients With Resected Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma. 2019

Groot, Vincent P / Gemenetzis, Georgios / Blair, Alex B / Rivero-Soto, Roberto J / Yu, Jun / Javed, Ammar A / Burkhart, Richard A / Rinkes, Inne H M Borel / Molenaar, I Quintus / Cameron, John L / Weiss, Matthew J / Wolfgang, Christopher L / He, Jin. ·Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Surgery, UMC Utrecht Cancer Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #31082915.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To establish an evidence-based cut-off to differentiate between early and late recurrence and to compare clinicopathologic risk factors between the two groups. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: A clear definition of "early recurrence" after pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma resection is currently lacking. METHODS: Patients undergoing pancreatectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma between 2000 and 2013 were included. Exclusion criteria were neoadjuvant therapy and incomplete follow-up. A minimum P-value approach was used to evaluate the optimal cut-off value of recurrence-free survival to divide the patients into early and late recurrence cohorts based on subsequent prognosis. Potential risk factors for early recurrence were assessed with logistic regression models. RESULTS: Of 957 included patients, 204 (21.3%) were recurrence-free at last follow-up. The optimal length of recurrence-free survival to distinguish between early (n = 388, 51.5%) and late recurrence (n = 365, 48.5%) was 12 months (P < 0.001). Patients with early recurrence had 1-, and 2-year post-recurrence survival rates of 20 and 6% compared with 45 and 22% for the late recurrence group (both P < 0.001). Preoperative risk factors for early recurrence included a Charlson age-comorbidity index ≥4 (OR 1.65), tumor size > 3.0 cm on computed tomography (OR 1.53) and CA 19-9 > 210 U/mL (OR 2.30). Postoperative risk factors consisted of poor tumor differentiation grade (OR 1.66), microscopic lymphovascular invasion (OR 1.70), a lymph node ratio > 0.2 (OR 2.49), and CA 19-9 > 37 U/mL (OR 3.38). Adjuvant chemotherapy (OR 0.28) and chemoradiotherapy (OR 0.29) were associated with a reduced likelihood of early recurrence. CONCLUSION: A recurrence-free interval of 12 months is the optimal threshold for differentiating between early and late recurrence, based on subsequent prognosis.

24 Article Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Surgical-site Infections: A Randomized Trial. 2019

Javed, Ammar A / Teinor, Jonathan / Wright, Michael / Ding, Ding / Burkhart, Richard A / Hundt, John / Cameron, John L / Makary, Martin A / He, Jin / Eckhauser, Frederic E / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Weiss, Matthew J. ·The John L. Cameron Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD. · Department of Surgery, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #31082899.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This study seeks to evaluate the efficacy of negative pressure wound therapy for surgical-site infection (SSI) after open pancreaticoduodenectomy. BACKGROUND: Despite improvement in infection control, SSIs remain a common cause of morbidity after abdominal surgery. SSI has been associated with an increased risk of reoperation, prolonged hospitalization, readmission, and higher costs. Recent retrospective studies have suggested that the use of negative pressure wound therapy can potentially prevent this complication. METHODS: We conducted a single-center randomized, controlled trial evaluating surgical incision closure during pancreaticoduodenectomy using negative pressure wound therapy in patients at high risk for SSI. We randomly assigned patients to receive negative pressure wound therapy or a standard wound closure. The primary end point of the study was the occurrence of a postoperative SSI. We evaluated the economic impact of the intervention. RESULTS: From January 2017 through February 2018, we randomized 123 patients at the time of closure of the surgical incision. SSI occurred in 9.7% (6/62) of patients in the negative pressure wound therapy group and in 31.1% (19/61) of patients in the standard closure group (relative risk = 0.31; 95% confidence interval, 0.13-0.73; P = 0.003). This corresponded to a relative risk reduction of 68.8%. SSIs were found to independently increase the cost of hospitalization by 23.8%. CONCLUSIONS: The use of negative pressure wound therapy resulted in a significantly lower risk of SSIs. Incorporating this intervention in surgical practice can help reduce a complication that significantly increases patient harm and healthcare costs.

25 Article Recurrence after neoadjuvant therapy and resection of borderline resectable and locally advanced pancreatic cancer. 2019

Groot, Vincent P / Blair, Alex B / Gemenetzis, Georgios / Ding, Ding / Burkhart, Richard A / Yu, Jun / Borel Rinkes, Inne H M / Molenaar, I Quintus / Cameron, John L / Weiss, Matthew J / Wolfgang, Christopher L / He, Jin. ·Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; Department of Surgery, UMC Utrecht Cancer Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Surgery, UMC Utrecht Cancer Center, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. Electronic address: jhe11@jhmi.edu. ·Eur J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #31023560.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The incidence, timing, and implications of recurrence in patients who underwent neoadjuvant treatment and surgical resection of borderline resectable (BRPC) or locally advanced (LAPC) pancreatic cancer are not well established. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with BRPC/LAPC who underwent post-neoadjuvant resection between 2007 and 2015 were included. Associations between clinicopathologic characteristics and specific recurrence locations, recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival from resection (OS) were assessed using Cox regression analyses. RESULTS: For 231 included patients, median survival from diagnosis and resection were 28.0 and 19.8 months, respectively. After a median RFS of 7.9 months, 189 (81.8%) patients had recurred. Multiple-site (n = 87, 46.0%) and liver-only recurrence (n = 28, 14.8%) generally occurred earlier and resulted in significantly worse OS when compared to local-only (n = 52, 27.5%) or lung-only recurrence (n = 18, 9.5%). Microscopic perineural invasion, yN1-yN2 status and elevated pre-surgery CA 19-9 >100 U/mL were associated with both local-only and multiple-site/liver-only recurrence. R1-margin was associated with local-only recurrence (HR 2.03). yN1-yN2 status and microscopic perineural invasion were independent predictors for both poor RFS and OS, while yT3-yT4 tumor stage (HR 1.39) and poor tumor differentiation (HR 1.60) were only predictive of poor OS. Adjuvant therapy was independently associated with both prolonged RFS (HR 0.73; median 7.0 vs. 10.9 months) and OS (HR 0.69; median 15.4 vs. 22.7 months). CONCLUSION: Despite neoadjuvant therapy leading to resection and relatively favorable pathologic tumor characteristics in BRPC/LAPC patients, more than 80% of patients experienced disease recurrence, 72.5% of which occurred at distant sites.

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