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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Colin D. Weekes
Based on 13 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Colin Weekes wrote the following 13 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma, Version 2.2017, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. 2017

Tempero, Margaret A / Malafa, Mokenge P / Al-Hawary, Mahmoud / Asbun, Horacio / Bain, Andrew / Behrman, Stephen W / Benson, Al B / Binder, Ellen / Cardin, Dana B / Cha, Charles / Chiorean, E Gabriela / Chung, Vincent / Czito, Brian / Dillhoff, Mary / Dotan, Efrat / Ferrone, Cristina R / Hardacre, Jeffrey / Hawkins, William G / Herman, Joseph / Ko, Andrew H / Komanduri, Srinadh / Koong, Albert / LoConte, Noelle / Lowy, Andrew M / Moravek, Cassadie / Nakakura, Eric K / O'Reilly, Eileen M / Obando, Jorge / Reddy, Sushanth / Scaife, Courtney / Thayer, Sarah / Weekes, Colin D / Wolff, Robert A / Wolpin, Brian M / Burns, Jennifer / Darlow, Susan. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #28784865.

ABSTRACT: Ductal adenocarcinoma and its variants account for most pancreatic malignancies. High-quality multiphase imaging can help to preoperatively distinguish between patients eligible for resection with curative intent and those with unresectable disease. Systemic therapy is used in the neoadjuvant or adjuvant pancreatic cancer setting, as well as in the management of locally advanced unresectable and metastatic disease. Clinical trials are critical for making progress in treatment of pancreatic cancer. The NCCN Guidelines for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma focus on diagnosis and treatment with systemic therapy, radiation therapy, and surgical resection.

2 Clinical Trial Phase I/II Study of Refametinib (BAY 86-9766) in Combination with Gemcitabine in Advanced Pancreatic cancer. 2017

Van Laethem, Jean-Luc / Riess, Hanno / Jassem, Jacek / Haas, Michael / Martens, Uwe M / Weekes, Colin / Peeters, Marc / Ross, Paul / Bridgewater, John / Melichar, Bohuslav / Cascinu, Stefano / Saramak, Piotr / Michl, Patrick / Van Brummelen, David / Zaniboni, Alberto / Schmiegel, Wollf / Dueland, Svein / Giurescu, Marius / Garosi, Vittorio L / Roth, Katrin / Schulz, Anke / Seidel, Henrik / Rajagopalan, Prabhu / Teufel, Michael / Childs, Barrett H. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Erasme University Hospital, CP 572/10, route de Lennik 808, 1070, Brussels, Belgium. JL.VanLaethem@erasme.ulb.ac.be. · Medical Department, Division of Hematology, Oncology and Tumor Immunology, Charity Hospital, Virchow-Klinikum Campus, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Medical University of Gdansk, M. Skłodowskiej-Curie 3a Street, Gdansk, 80-210, Poland. · Department of Hematology and Oncology, University of Munich Medical Center, Marchioninistraße 15, 81366, Munich, Germany. · Department of Hematology and Oncology, Cancer Center Heilbronn-Franken, Am Gesundbrunnen 20-26, 74078, Heilbronn, Germany. · Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Cancer Center, 1665 Aurora Ct, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA. · Department of Oncology, Antwerp University Hospital, Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650, Edegem, Belgium. · Department of Medical Oncology, Guy's & St Thomas' Hospital, Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7EH, UK. · Department of Oncology, UCL Cancer Institute, 72 Huntley Street, London, WC1E 6DD, UK. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and University Hospital Olomouc, Křížkovského 8, 771 47, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Medical Oncology, A.O.U. United Hospitals, Polytechnic University of Marche, Piazza Roma, 22, Ancona, Italy. · Department of Oncological Gastroenterology, Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center, ul. W.K. Roentgena 5, 02-781, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Gastroenterology, Endocrinology, Metabolism and Infectiology, University Hospital of Giessen and Marburg, Baldingerstraße, 35043, Marburg, Germany. · Universitätsklinikum Halle - University Hospital Halle (Saale), Ernst-Grube-Straße 40, 06120, Halle (Saale), Germany. · Department of Radiotherapy, UZ Brussels, Avenue du Laerbeek 101, 1090, Brussels, Belgium. · Department of Medical Oncology, Poliambulanza Foundation Hospital Institute, Via Bissolati, 57, Brescia, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Medical University Hospital Bochum, Alexandrinenstraße 1, Bochum, 44791, Germany. · Department of Oncology, Oslo University Radium Hospital, Trondheimsveien 235, Bjerke, 0514, Oslo, Norway. · Bayer Pharma AG, Müllerstraße 178, 13353, Berlin, Germany. · Bayer S.p.A., Viale Certosa 126-130, 20156, Milan, Italy. · Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 100 Bayer Blvd, Whippany, NJ, 07981, USA. ·Target Oncol · Pubmed #27975152.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Activating KRAS mutations are reported in up to 90% of pancreatic cancers. Refametinib potently inhibits MEK1/2, part of the MAPK signaling pathway. This phase I/II study evaluated the safety and efficacy of refametinib plus gemcitabine in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Phase I comprised dose escalation, followed by phase II expansion. Refametinib and gemcitabine plasma levels were analyzed for pharmacokinetics. KRAS mutational status was determined from circulating tumor DNA. RESULTS: Ninety patients overall received treatment. The maximum tolerated dose was refametinib 50 mg twice daily plus standard gemcitabine (1000 mg/m CONCLUSION: Refametinib plus gemcitabine was well tolerated, with a promising objective response rate, and had an acceptable safety profile and no pharmacokinetic interaction. There was a trend towards improved outcomes in patients without detectable KRAS mutations that deserves future investigation.

3 Clinical Trial A phase 1b study of erlotinib in combination with gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel in patients with previously untreated advanced pancreatic cancer: an Academic Oncology GI Cancer Consortium study. 2016

Cohen, Steven J / O'Neil, Bert H / Berlin, Jordan / Ames, Patricia / McKinley, Marti / Horan, Julie / Catalano, Patricia M / Davies, Angela / Weekes, Colin D / Leichman, Lawrence. ·Fox Chase Cancer Center, 333 Cottman Avenue, Philadelphia, PA, 19111-2497, USA. steven.cohen@fccc.edu. · Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, IN, USA. · Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN, USA. · Abrazo Community Health Network, Phoenix, AZ, USA. · Aptium Oncology, Criterium, Inc., Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Novella Clinical, Boulder, CO, USA. · Champions Oncology, Hackensack, NJ, USA. · University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA. · New York University, New York, NY, USA. ·Cancer Chemother Pharmacol · Pubmed #26886016.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Addition of either nab-paclitaxel or erlotinib to gemcitabine to treat advanced pancreatic cancer has demonstrated overall survival benefit. This study was conducted to evaluate the tolerability and safety of combining all three drugs and assess preliminary evidence of efficacy. METHODS: In this open-label, phase 1b study, patients with previously untreated, advanced pancreatic cancer were treated in 28-day cycles with intravenous gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel on days 1, 8, and 15, and once daily oral erlotinib. A standard "3 + 3" design was used. Dose level 1 (DL1) for gemcitabine (mg/m(2))/nab-paclitaxel (mg/m(2))/erlotinib (mg) was 1000/125/100, respectively, with de-escalation to DL-1 (1000/100/100), DL-2b (1000/75/100), and DL-3 (1000/75/75). The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was defined by occurrence of dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) in ≤1 of six patients within the first cycle. Efficacy was assessed with CT scans performed at two-cycle intervals. RESULTS: Nineteen patients were enrolled. DLTs occurred in two patients at DL1, three patients at DL-1, two patients at DL-2b, and one patient at DL-3. The MTD for the combination of gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel/erlotinib was DL-3 (1000/75/75). In analyses of efficacy among 14 evaluable patients, partial responses were observed in four of six patients at DL1, one of two patients at DL-2b, and two of six patients at DL-3. CONCLUSION: The addition of erlotinib to gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel is not tolerable at standard single-agent dosing of all drugs. However, significant clinical activity was noted, even at DL-3. Further study of the combination will need to incorporate reduced dosing.

4 Clinical Trial Phase I trial of vandetanib in combination with gemcitabine and capecitabine in patients with advanced solid tumors with an expanded cohort in pancreatic and biliary cancers. 2016

Kessler, Elizabeth R / Eckhardt, S Gail / Pitts, Todd M / Bradshaw-Pierce, Erica L / O'byrant, Cindy L / Messersmith, Wells A / Nallapreddy, Sujatha / Weekes, Colin / Spratlin, Jennifer / Lieu, Christopher H / Kane, Madeleine A / Eppers, Sarah / Freas, Elizabeth / Leong, Stephen. ·Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, MS 8117, 12801 E 17th Avenue, Room 8120, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA. · University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, Colorado, USA. · Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Skaggs School of Pharmacy, Aurora, CO, USA. · Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Skaggs School of Pharmacy, Aurora, CO, USA. · Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. · Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, MS 8117, 12801 E 17th Avenue, Room 8120, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA. stephen.leong@ucdenver.edu. · University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, Colorado, USA. stephen.leong@ucdenver.edu. ·Invest New Drugs · Pubmed #26715573.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Vandetanib is a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor that affects vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and rearranged during transfection (RET) mediated receptors which are important for growth and invasion of biliary and pancreatic cancers. This phase I study evaluated the safety profile of vandetanib in combination with standard doses of gemcitabine and capecitabine in order to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). METHODS: In this single center phase I trial, patients received gemcitabine intravenously (i.v.) at 1000 mg/m2 days 1, 8, 15 in a 28 day cycle, capecitabine orally at 850 mg/m2 twice daily on days 1-21, and escalating doses of vandetanib (200 or 300 mg orally daily). Once the MTD was defined, an expansion cohort of patients with advanced biliary cancers and locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer was enrolled. Blood samples were also collected at predetermined time points for biomarker analysis. RESULTS: Twenty-three patients were enrolled: 9 in the dose escalation and 14 in the dose expansion cohort. One dose limiting toxicity (DLT), of grade 4 neutropenia, occurred in the 200 mg vandetanib cohort. The most common adverse effects were diarrhea (39 %), nausea and vomiting (34%), and rash (33%). There were 3 partial responses and stable disease of >2 months (range 2-45, median 5) was observed in 15/23 patients. There was no association between changes in biomarker analytes and disease response. CONCLUSION: The combination of gemcitabine, capecitabine and vandetanib is well tolerated at the recommended phase II dose of gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2 weekly for three consecutive weeks, capecitabine 850 mg/m2 BID days 1-21, and vandetanib 300 mg daily, every 28 days. This combination demonstrated promising activity in pancreaticobiliary cancers and further evaluation is warranted in these diseases. NCT00551096.

5 Clinical Trial Prognostic factors of survival in a randomized phase III trial (MPACT) of weekly nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine versus gemcitabine alone in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. 2015

Tabernero, Josep / Chiorean, E Gabriela / Infante, Jeffrey R / Hingorani, Sunil R / Ganju, Vinod / Weekes, Colin / Scheithauer, Werner / Ramanathan, Ramesh K / Goldstein, David / Penenberg, Darryl N / Romano, Alfredo / Ferrara, Stefano / Von Hoff, Daniel D. ·Medical Oncology Department, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital and Institute of Oncology, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Division of Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; Department of Oncology/Hematology, Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Nashville, Tennessee, USA; Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA; Department of Oncology, Peninsula Oncology Centre, Monash University, Frankston, Victoria, Australia; Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, Colorado, USA; Division of Clinical Oncology, Medizinische Universität Wien, Vienna, Austria; Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA; Department of Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Celgene Corporation, Summit, New Jersey, USA; Department of Oncology, Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare/TGen, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA jtabernero@vhio.net. · Medical Oncology Department, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital and Institute of Oncology, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Division of Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; Department of Oncology/Hematology, Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Nashville, Tennessee, USA; Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA; Department of Oncology, Peninsula Oncology Centre, Monash University, Frankston, Victoria, Australia; Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, Colorado, USA; Division of Clinical Oncology, Medizinische Universität Wien, Vienna, Austria; Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA; Department of Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Celgene Corporation, Summit, New Jersey, USA; Department of Oncology, Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare/TGen, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA. ·Oncologist · Pubmed #25582141.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: nab-Paclitaxel in combination with gemcitabine has emerged as a new treatment option for patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer (MPC), based on superiority over gemcitabine demonstrated in the phase III MPACT trial. Previously, Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score and the presence of liver metastases were shown to be predictive of survival with nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine treatment. This analysis sought to further explore the relationship between clinical characteristics and survival in the MPACT trial and to identify potential predictors of overall survival and progression-free survival in patients with MPC. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cox regression models adjusted for stratification factors and a stepwise multivariate analysis of prespecified baseline prognostic factors were performed. RESULTS: Treatment effect was significantly associated with survival, with a similar magnitude of reduction in risk of death compared with the previously reported primary analysis. Treatment effect consistently favored nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine across the majority of the prespecified factors. In addition to KPS score and presence of liver metastases, age and number of metastatic sites were independent prognostic factors of overall and progression-free survival. Baseline carbohydrate antigen 19-9 was not found to be an independent prognostic factor of survival in this analysis. CONCLUSION: The results of this analysis confirm broad utility of nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine for the treatment of MPC. In addition, these findings suggest that KPS score, presence of liver metastases, age, and number of metastatic sites are important predictors of survival that may be useful when making treatment decisions and designing future clinical trials.

6 Clinical Trial Phase I study of Rigosertib, an inhibitor of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and Polo-like kinase 1 pathways, combined with gemcitabine in patients with solid tumors and pancreatic cancer. 2012

Ma, Wen Wee / Messersmith, Wells A / Dy, Grace K / Weekes, Colin D / Whitworth, Amy / Ren, Chen / Maniar, Manoj / Wilhelm, Francois / Eckhardt, S Gail / Adjei, Alex A / Jimeno, Antonio. ·Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York; University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, CO 80045,USA. ·Clin Cancer Res · Pubmed #22338014.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Rigosertib, a dual non-ATP inhibitor of polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathways (PI3K), and gemcitabine have synergistic antitumor activity when combined in preclinical studies. This phase I study aimed to determine the recommended phase II dose (RPTD) of the combination of rigosertib and gemcitabine in patients with cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Patients with solid tumors who failed standard therapy or were candidates for gemcitabine-based therapy were eligible. Gemcitabine was administered on days 1, 8, and 15 on a 28-day cycle and rigosertib on days 1, 4, 8, 11, 15, and 18. Pharmacokinetic studies were conducted during an expansion cohort of patients with advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). RESULTS: Forty patients were treated, 19 in the dose-escalation phase and 21 in the expansion cohort. Dose levels evaluated were (gemcitabine/rigosertib mg/m(2)): 750/600 (n = 4), 750/1,200 (n = 3), 1,000/600 (n = 3), 1,000/1,200 (n = 3), and 1,000/1,800 (n = 6 + 21). One dose-limiting toxicity (death) occurred at the highest dose level (1,000/1,800) tested. Non-dose-limiting ≥grade II/III toxicities included neutropenia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, fatigue, and nausea. Grade III/IV neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and fatigue were seen in two, one, and two patients in the expansion cohort. Partial responses were observed in PDA, thymic cancer, and Hodgkin lymphoma, including gemcitabine-pretreated PDA. The pharmacokinetic profile of rigosertib was not affected by gemcitabine. CONCLUSION: The RPTD established in this study is rigosertib 1,800 mg/m(2) and gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2). This regimen is well tolerated with a toxicity profile of the combination similar to the profile of gemcitabine alone. Antitumor efficacy was observed in patients who previously progressed on gemcitabine-based therapy.

7 Clinical Trial A phase I, dose-escalation study of pomalidomide (CC-4047) in combination with gemcitabine in metastatic pancreas cancer. 2011

Infante, Jeffrey R / Jones, Suzanne F / Bendell, Johanna C / Spigel, David R / Yardley, Denise A / Weekes, Colin D / Messersmith, Wells A / Hainsworth, John D / Burris, Howard A. ·Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Nashville, TN 37203, USA. jinfante@tnonc.com ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #21051221.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Pomalidomide is an investigational immunomodulating drug (IMiD) that also inhibits angiogenesis and has direct anti-tumour effects. This phase I study was performed to identify the optimal dose of pomalidomide to be used in combination with gemcitabine in the treatment of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Eligible patients had histologically documented metastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. No prior gemcitabine for metastatic disease or for primary treatment of locally advanced disease was allowed although prior radiation therapy with 5-flourouracil (5-FU) or gemcitabine as a radiosensitizer was allowed. All patients received gemcitabine 1000 mg/m(2) IV on days 1, 8 and 15 of a 28 day cycle. Pomalidomide was administered orally on days 1-21 at doses escalated from 2 to 10mg daily. Patients were re-evaluated every 8 weeks; treatment continued until disease progression or intolerable toxicity occurred. RESULTS: Twenty-three patients were enrolled with a median age of 62 and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status 0 (87%) and 1 (13%). The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was 10mg/day on days 1-21. Neutropaenia was the most common grade 3/4 toxicity (38%); other grade 3/4 toxicity included deep vein thrombosis (DVT) (22%) and anaemia (9%). While efficacy was not a primary end-point of this study, 3 of 20 evaluable patients (15%) had partial responses and 10 patients (50%) had >50% decrease in CA 19-9 levels. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of pomalidomide and gemcitabine was feasible and safe in most patients receiving first-line chemotherapy for metastatic pancreatic cancer. Neutropaenia, the dose-limiting toxicity, was brief and reversible. Intermittent dosing of pomalidomide allowed substantially higher doses than were previously reported with a continuous schedule. This combination merits further evaluation in the treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer.

8 Clinical Trial Thymidylate synthase (TYMS) enhancer region genotype-directed phase II trial of oral capecitabine for 2nd line treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. 2011

Weekes, Colin D / Nallapareddy, Sujatha / Rudek, Michelle A / Norris-Kirby, Alexis / Laheru, Daniel / Jimeno, Antonio / Donehower, Ross C / Murphy, Kathleen M / Hidalgo, Manuel / Baker, Sharyn D / Messersmith, Wells A. ·University of Colorado Cancer Center, 12801 E 17th Avenue, RC-1 South, Rm 8123, MS 8117, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. colin.weekes@ucdenver.edu ·Invest New Drugs · Pubmed #20306339.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The primary aim of this study was to characterize the 6-month overall survival and toxicity associated with second-line capecitabine treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer patients harboring the TYMS *2/*2 allele. The secondary aim was to analyze the response rate and pharmacokinetics of capecitabine-based therapy in this patient population. Lastly, TYMS, ATM and RecQ1 single nucleotide polymorphism were analyzed relative to overall survival in patients screened for study participation. METHODS: Eighty patients with stage IV pancreatic cancer were screened for the *2/*2 TYMS allele. Patients with the *2/*2 TYMS polymorphism were treated with capecitabine, 1,000 mg/m2 twice daily for 14 consecutive days of a 21 day cycle. Screened patients not possessing TYMS *2/*2 were monitored for survival. Pharmacokinetic analysis was done during Cycle 1 of the therapy. RESULTS: Sixteen of the 80 screened patients tested positive for *2/*2 TYMS variant. Four out of the 16 eligible patients were treated on study. The study was terminated early due to poor accrual and increased toxicity. Three patients experienced grade 3 non-hematologic toxicities of palmer-plantar erythrodysesthesia, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. Grade 2 toxicities were similar and occurred in all patients. Only one patient was evaluable for response after completion of three cycles of therapy. The presence of the *2/*2 TYMS genotype in all of the screened patients trended toward a decreased overall survival. CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this study represents the first genotype-directed clinical trial for patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Although the study was closed early, it appears capecitabine therapy in pancreatic cancer patients harboring the TYMS *2/*2 variant may be associated with increased non-hematologic toxicity. This study also demonstrates the challenges performing a genotype-directed study in the second-line setting for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

9 Article MUC1 and HIF-1alpha Signaling Crosstalk Induces Anabolic Glucose Metabolism to Impart Gemcitabine Resistance to Pancreatic Cancer. 2017

Shukla, Surendra K / Purohit, Vinee / Mehla, Kamiya / Gunda, Venugopal / Chaika, Nina V / Vernucci, Enza / King, Ryan J / Abrego, Jaime / Goode, Gennifer D / Dasgupta, Aneesha / Illies, Alysha L / Gebregiworgis, Teklab / Dai, Bingbing / Augustine, Jithesh J / Murthy, Divya / Attri, Kuldeep S / Mashadova, Oksana / Grandgenett, Paul M / Powers, Robert / Ly, Quan P / Lazenby, Audrey J / Grem, Jean L / Yu, Fang / Matés, José M / Asara, John M / Kim, Jung-Whan / Hankins, Jordan H / Weekes, Colin / Hollingsworth, Michael A / Serkova, Natalie J / Sasson, Aaron R / Fleming, Jason B / Oliveto, Jennifer M / Lyssiotis, Costas A / Cantley, Lewis C / Berim, Lyudmyla / Singh, Pankaj K. ·Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer and Allied Diseases, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950, USA. · Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer and Allied Diseases, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950, USA; Department of Pathology and Microbiology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198, USA. · Department of Chemistry, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588, USA. · Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. · Department of Surgery, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198, USA. · Department of Pathology and Microbiology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198, USA. · Department of Internal Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198, USA. · Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of Málaga and IBIMA, 29071 Málaga, Spain. · Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. · Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Texas at Dallas, 800 West Campbell Road, Richardson, TX 75080, USA. · Department of Radiology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198, USA. · Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. · Department of Anesthesiology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. · Department of Surgery, Health Sciences Center T18-065, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA. · Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48103, USA. · Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer and Allied Diseases, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-5950, USA; Department of Pathology and Microbiology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198, USA. Electronic address: pankaj.singh@unmc.edu. ·Cancer Cell · Pubmed #28697344.

ABSTRACT: Poor response to cancer therapy due to resistance remains a clinical challenge. The present study establishes a widely prevalent mechanism of resistance to gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer, whereby increased glycolytic flux leads to glucose addiction in cancer cells and a corresponding increase in pyrimidine biosynthesis to enhance the intrinsic levels of deoxycytidine triphosphate (dCTP). Increased levels of dCTP diminish the effective levels of gemcitabine through molecular competition. We also demonstrate that MUC1-regulated stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) mediates such metabolic reprogramming. Targeting HIF-1α or de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis, in combination with gemcitabine, strongly diminishes tumor burden. Finally, reduced expression of TKT and CTPS, which regulate flux into pyrimidine biosynthesis, correlates with better prognosis in pancreatic cancer patients on fluoropyrimidine analogs.

10 Article Patterns of Care for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Using the National Cancer Database. 2017

Amini, Arya / Jones, Bernard L / Stumpf, Priscilla / Leong, Stephen / Lieu, Christopher H / Weekes, Colin / Davis, S Lindsey / Messersmith, Wells A / Purcell, William T / Ghosh, Debashis / Schefter, Tracey / Goodman, Karyn A. ·From the *Department of Radiation Oncology, †Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, and ‡Department of Biostatistics, University of Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, CO. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #28697131.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The role of radiotherapy (RT) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is uncertain. This study examines patterns of care and survival outcomes of LAPC undergoing chemotherapy alone versus chemotherapy plus RT (C + RT). METHODS: The National Cancer Database was queried for nonmetastatic LAPC patients who received chemotherapy alone or C + RT. RESULTS: Of the 13,695 patients included, 5306 underwent chemotherapy alone and 4971, C + RT. Use of C + RT declined from 2003 to 2011 (73%-53%), whereas chemotherapy alone increased. Of those receiving RT, rates of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) increased (27%-72%), whereas 3-dimensional (3D) RT decreased (73%-28%). Unadjusted 1-year overall survival (OS) was longer for versus chemotherapy (45.6% vs 38.7%), as was 2-year OS (12.9% vs 11.9%) (hazard ratio, 0.88; 0.85-0.91; P < 0.001). Under multivariate analysis, C + RT was associated with improved OS (hazard ratio, 0.84; 0.81-0.87; P < 0.001). On subgroup analysis comparing C + IMRT, C + 3D RT, and chemotherapy alone, 1-year OS was 49.1%, 45.1%, and 38.7%, and 2-year OS was 13.1%, 11.6%, and 11.9% accordingly. CONCLUSIONS: Utilization of RT in LAPC is decreasing, whereas chemotherapy alone is increasing. Of patients undergoing RT, rates of IMRT are increasing. Whereas C + IMRT appeared to be associated with improved OS compared with chemotherapy alone, 3D RT was not.

11 Article CD147: a small molecule transporter ancillary protein at the crossroad of multiple hallmarks of cancer and metabolic reprogramming. 2017

Kendrick, Agnieszka A / Schafer, Johnathon / Dzieciatkowska, Monika / Nemkov, Travis / D'Alessandro, Angelo / Neelakantan, Deepika / Ford, Heide L / Pearson, Chad G / Weekes, Colin D / Hansen, Kirk C / Eisenmesser, Elan Z. ·Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, CO, USA. · Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, CO, USA. · Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, CO, USA. · Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, CO, USA. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #28039486.

ABSTRACT: Increased expression of CD147 in pancreatic cancer has been proposed to play a critical role in cancer progression via CD147 chaperone function for lactate monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). Here, we show for the first time that CD147 interacts with membrane transporters beyond MCTs and exhibits a protective role for several of its interacting partners. CD147 prevents its interacting partner's proteasome-dependent degradation and incorrect plasma membrane localization through the CD147 transmembrane (TM) region. The interactions with transmembrane small molecule and ion transporters identified here indicate a central role of CD147 in pancreatic cancer metabolic reprogramming, particularly with respect to amino acid anabolism and calcium signaling. Importantly, CD147 genetic ablation prevents pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth in vitro and in vivo in conjunction with metabolic rewiring towards amino acid anabolism, thus paving the way for future combined pharmacological treatments.

12 Article Pancreatic adenocarcinoma, version 2.2014: featured updates to the NCCN guidelines. 2014

Tempero, Margaret A / Malafa, Mokenge P / Behrman, Stephen W / Benson, Al B / Casper, Ephraim S / Chiorean, E Gabriela / Chung, Vincent / Cohen, Steven J / Czito, Brian / Engebretson, Anitra / Feng, Mary / Hawkins, William G / Herman, Joseph / Hoffman, John P / Ko, Andrew / Komanduri, Srinadh / Koong, Albert / Lowy, Andrew M / Ma, Wen Wee / Merchant, Nipun B / Mulvihill, Sean J / Muscarella, Peter / Nakakura, Eric K / Obando, Jorge / Pitman, Martha B / Reddy, Sushanth / Sasson, Aaron R / Thayer, Sarah P / Weekes, Colin D / Wolff, Robert A / Wolpin, Brian M / Burns, Jennifer L / Freedman-Cass, Deborah A. ·From UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; Moffitt Cancer Center; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; Fox Chase Cancer Center; Duke Cancer Institute; Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN); University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; Stanford Cancer Institute; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; Roswell Park Cancer Institute; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center at The Nebraska Medical Center; University of Colorado Cancer Center; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; and National Comprehensive Cancer Network. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #25099441.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma discuss the diagnosis and management of adenocarcinomas of the exocrine pancreas and are intended to assist with clinical decision-making. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize major discussion points from the 2014 NCCN Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Panel meeting. The panel discussion focused mainly on the management of borderline resectable and locally advanced disease. In particular, the panel discussed the definition of borderline resectable disease, role of neoadjuvant therapy in borderline disease, role of chemoradiation in locally advanced disease, and potential role of newer, more active chemotherapy regimens in both settings.

13 Article Stromal cell-derived factor 1α mediates resistance to mTOR-directed therapy in pancreatic cancer. 2012

Weekes, Colin D / Song, Dongweon / Arcaroli, John / Wilson, Lora A / Rubio-Viqueira, Belen / Cusatis, George / Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth / Messersmith, Wells A / Winn, Robert A / Hidalgo, Manuel. ·University of Colorado Cancer Center, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. colin.weekes@ucdenver.edu ·Neoplasia · Pubmed #22952422.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The factors preventing the translation of preclinical findings supporting the clinical development mTOR-targeted therapy in pancreatic cancer therapy remain undetermined. Stromal cell.derived factor 1α (SDF-1α)-CXCR4 signaling was examined as a representative microenvironmental factor able to promote mTOR-targeted therapy resistance in pancreatic cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Primary pancreas explant xenografts and in vitro experiments were used to perform pharmacodynamic analyses of SDF-1α-CXCR4 regulation of the mTOR pathway. Combinatorial effects of CXCR4, EGFR, and mTOR pharmacologic inhibition were evaluated in temsirolimus-resistant and -sensitive xenografts. Intratumoral gene and protein expressions of mTOR pathway effectors cyclin D1, c-Myc, and VEGF were evaluated. RESULTS: Baseline intratumoral SDF-1α gene expression correlated with temsirolimus resistance in explant models. SDF-1α stimulation of pancreatic cells resulted in CXCR4-mediated PI3-kinase-dependent S6-RP phosphorylation (pS6-RP) on exposure to temsirolimus. Combinatorial therapy with AMD3465 (CXCR4 small-molecule inhibitor) and temsirolimus resulted in effective tumor growth inhibition to overcome temsirolimus resistance. In contrast, SDF-1α exposure induced a temsirolimus-resistant phenotype in temsirolimus-sensitive explants. AMD3465 inhibited CXCR4-mediated intratumoral S6-RP phosphorylation and cyclin D and c-myc gene expression. Next, CXCR4 promoted intratumoral EGFR expression in association with temsirolimus resistance. Treatment with AMD3465, temsirolimus- and erlotinib-mediated tumor growth inhibition to overcome temsirolimus resistance in the explant model. Lastly, SDF-1α-CXCR4 signaling increased intratumoral VEGF gene and protein expression. CONCLUSIONS: SDF-1α-CXCR4 signaling represents a microenvironmental factor that can maintain mTOR pathway fidelity to promote resistance to mTOR-targeted therapy in pancreatic cancer by a variety of mechanisms such as recruitment of EGFR signaling and angiogenesis.