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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Mary A. Waterhouse
Based on 5 articles published since 2010
(Why 5 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, M. Waterhouse wrote the following 5 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Chemotherapy in patients with unresected pancreatic cancer in Australia: A population-based study of uptake and survival. 2018

Dumbrava, Monica I / Burmeister, Elizabeth A / Wyld, David / Goldstein, David / O'Connell, Dianne L / Beesley, Vanessa L / Gooden, Helen M / Janda, Monika / Jordan, Susan J / Merrett, Neil D / Payne, Madeleine E / Waterhouse, Mary A / Neale, Rachel E. ·QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Cancer Council New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · University of Newcastle, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · University of Western Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·Asia Pac J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #29573158.

ABSTRACT: AIM: Palliative chemotherapy improves symptom control and prolongs survival in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer, but there is a paucity of data describing its use and effectiveness in everyday practice. We explored patterns of chemotherapy use in patients with unresected pancreatic cancer in Australia and the impact of use on survival. METHODS: We reviewed the medical records of residents of New South Wales or Queensland, Australia, diagnosed with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma between July 2009 and June 2011. Associations between receipt of chemotherapy and sociodemographic, clinical and health service factors were evaluated using logistic regression. We used Cox proportional hazards models to analyze associations between chemotherapy use and survival. RESULTS: Data were collected for 1173 eligible patients. Chemotherapy was received by 44% (n = 184/414) of patients with localized pancreatic cancer and 53% (n = 406/759) of patients with metastases. Chemotherapy receipt depended on clinical factors, such as performance status and comorbidity burden, and nonclinical factors, such as age, place of residence, multidisciplinary team review and the type of specialist first encountered. Consultation with an oncologist mitigated most of the sociodemographic and service-related disparities in chemotherapy use. The receipt of chemotherapy was associated with prolonged survival in patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer, including after adjusting for common prognostic factors. CONCLUSIONS: These findings highlight the need to establish referral pathways to ensure that all patients have the opportunity to discuss treatment options with a medical oncologist. This is particularly relevant for health care systems covering areas with a geographically dispersed population.

2 Article Biliary Stenting in Patients With Pancreatic Cancer: Results From a Population-Based Cohort Study. 2018

Payne, Madeleine / Burmeister, Elizabeth A / Waterhouse, Mary / Jordan, Susan J / OʼConnell, Dianne L / Merrett, Neil D / Goldstein, David / Wyld, David / Beesley, Vanessa L / Gooden, Helen / Janda, Monika / Neale, Rachel E. · ·Pancreas · Pubmed #29215539.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: We aimed to describe management of biliary obstruction (BO) in the context of pancreatic cancer within a population-based cohort. METHODS: We examined management of BO in 1863 patients diagnosed as having pancreatic cancer in 2010/2011. We used descriptive statistics and logistic regression to describe patterns of biliary stent usage, complications and duration of patency, associations between preoperative stenting and surgical outcomes, and between patient factors and management of jaundice. RESULTS: Almost half of the people in the cohort (n = 909) were jaundiced within 12 months of diagnosis. Two-thirds of these had at least 1 stent inserted. Preoperative stenting, mostly with plastic stents, occurred for 72% of patients who experienced jaundice prior to an attempted resection but was not associated with surgical outcomes. Seventy percent of the jaundiced patients who did not have an attempted resection were stented. Metal stents were less frequently replaced within 30 days than plastic (9% vs 42%). Living in a rural area was associated with reduced likelihood of having jaundice managed. CONCLUSIONS: Plastic stents were still used frequently, despite guidelines recommending metal in most contexts. Patients living in rural areas were less likely to have BO managed. This work highlights the need to monitor current practice.

3 Article Determinants of survival and attempted resection in patients with non-metastatic pancreatic cancer: An Australian population-based study. 2016

Burmeister, E A / Waterhouse, M / Jordan, S J / O'Connell, D L / Merrett, N D / Goldstein, D / Wyld, D / Beesley, V / Gooden, H / Janda, M / Neale, R E. ·QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Electronic address: Elizabeth.Burmeister@qimrberghofer.edu.au. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Cancer Council NSW, Sydney, Australia; University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia; University of Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Western Sydney University, NSW, Australia; Bankstown Hospital, NSW, Australia. · University of New South Wales, NSW, Australia; Prince of Wales Hospital, NSW, Australia. · The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. · University of Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #27374480.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There are indications that pancreatic cancer survival may differ according to sociodemographic factors, such as residential location. This may be due to differential access to curative resection. Understanding factors associated with the decision to offer a resection might enable strategies to increase the proportion of patients undergoing potentially curative surgery. METHODS: Data were extracted from medical records and cancer registries for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer between July 2009 and June 2011, living in one of two Australian states. Among patients clinically staged with non-metastatic disease we examined factors associated with survival using Cox proportional hazards models. To investigate survival differences we examined determinants of: 1) attempted surgical resection overall; 2) whether patients with locally advanced disease were classified as having resectable disease; and 3) attempted resection among those considered resectable. RESULTS: Data were collected for 786 eligible patients. Disease was considered locally advanced for 561 (71%) patients, 510 (65%) were classified as having potentially resectable disease and 365 (72%) of these had an attempted resection. Along with age, comorbidities and tumour stage, increasing remoteness of residence was associated with poorer survival. Remoteness of residence and review by a hepatobiliary surgeon were factors influencing the decision to offer surgery. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicated disparity in survival dependent on patients' residential location and access to a specialist hepatobiliary surgeon. Accurate clinical staging is a critical element in assessing surgical resectability and it is therefore crucial that all patients have access to specialised clinical services.

4 Article Determinants of Outcomes Following Resection for Pancreatic Cancer-a Population-Based Study. 2016

Waterhouse, Mary A / Burmeister, Elizabeth A / O'Connell, Dianne L / Ballard, Emma L / Jordan, Susan J / Merrett, Neil D / Goldstein, David / Wyld, David / Janda, Monika / Beesley, Vanessa L / Payne, Madeleine E / Gooden, Helen M / Neale, Rachel E. ·QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia. · The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. · Cancer Council New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. · University of Newcastle, Sydney, Australia. · University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · Western Sydney University, Sydney, Australia. · University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. · Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, Australia. · Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. · Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia. rachel.neale@qimrberghofer.edu.au. ·J Gastrointest Surg · Pubmed #27184672.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Patient and health system determinants of outcomes following pancreatic cancer resection, particularly the relative importance of hospital and surgeon volume, are unclear. Our objective was to identify patient, tumour and health service factors related to mortality and survival amongst a cohort of patients who underwent completed resection for pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Eligible patients were diagnosed with pancreatic adenocarcinoma between July 2009 and June 2011 and had a completed resection performed in Queensland or New South Wales, Australia, with either tumour-free (R0) or microscopically involved margins (R1) (n = 270). Associations were examined using logistic regression (for binary outcomes) and Cox proportional hazards or stratified Cox models (for time-to-event outcomes). RESULTS: Patients treated by surgeons who performed <4 resections/year were more likely to die from a surgical complication (versus ≥4 resections/year, P = 0.04), had higher 1-year mortality (P = 0.03), and worse overall survival up to 1.5 years after surgery (adjusted hazard ratio 1.58, 95 % confidence interval 1.07-2.34). Amongst patients who had ≥1 complication within 30 days of surgery, those aged ≥70 years had higher 1-year mortality compared to patients aged <60 years. Adjuvant chemotherapy treatment improved recurrence-free survival (P = 0.01). There were no significant associations between hospital volume and mortality or survival. CONCLUSIONS: Systems should be implemented to ensure that surgeons are completing a sufficient number of resections to optimize patient outcomes. These findings may be particularly relevant for countries with a relatively small and geographically dispersed population.

5 Article Vitamin D and pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium. 2015

Waterhouse, M / Risch, H A / Bosetti, C / Anderson, K E / Petersen, G M / Bamlet, W R / Cotterchio, M / Cleary, S P / Ibiebele, T I / La Vecchia, C / Skinner, H G / Strayer, L / Bracci, P M / Maisonneuve, P / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Zaton Ski, W / Lu, L / Yu, H / Janik-Koncewicz, K / Polesel, J / Serraino, D / Neale, R E / Anonymous4011075. ·Division of Population Health, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston Centre for Research Excellence in Sun and Health, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Australia. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, IRCCS-Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Milan, Italy. · Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, USA. · Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Division of Population Health, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston. · Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. · Truven Health Analytics, Durham. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA. · Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Department of Epidemiology, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland. · Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, USA. · Division of Population Health, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston Centre for Research Excellence in Sun and Health, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Australia rachel.neale@qimrberghofer.edu.au. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #25977560.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The potential role of vitamin D in the aetiology of pancreatic cancer is unclear, with recent studies suggesting both positive and negative associations. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We used data from nine case-control studies from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4) to examine associations between pancreatic cancer risk and dietary vitamin D intake. Study-specific odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using multivariable logistic regression, and ORs were then pooled using a random-effects model. From a subset of four studies, we also calculated pooled estimates of association for supplementary and total vitamin D intake. RESULTS: Risk of pancreatic cancer increased with dietary intake of vitamin D [per 100 international units (IU)/day: OR = 1.13, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-1.19, P = 7.4 × 10(-6), P-heterogeneity = 0.52; ≥230 versus <110 IU/day: OR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.10-1.55, P = 2.4 × 10(-3), P-heterogeneity = 0.81], with the association possibly stronger in people with low retinol/vitamin A intake. CONCLUSION: Increased risk of pancreatic cancer was observed with higher levels of dietary vitamin D intake. Additional studies are required to determine whether or not our finding has a causal basis.