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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Takashi Watanabe
Based on 5 articles published since 2010
(Why 5 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Takashi Watanabe wrote the following 5 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Perivascular Epithelial Cell Tumor of the Pancreas Diagnosed Preoperatively by Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Fine-needle Aspiration. 2019

Uno, Konomu / Shimizu, Shuya / Hayashi, Katsumi / Yamada, Tomonori / Kusakabe, Atsunori / Kanie, Hiroshi / Mizuno, Yusuke / Nagao, Kazuhiro / Araki, Hiromichi / Toyohara, Tadashi / Kanda, Takeo / Okayama, Kohei / Suzuki, Takanori / Miyagishima, Shun / Watanabe, Takashi / Nakazawa, Takahiro. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Japanese Red Cross Nagoya Daini Hospital, Japan. ·Intern Med · Pubmed #31178480.

ABSTRACT: We herein report a 49-year-old woman with a perivascular epithelial cell tumor (PEComa) of the pancreas. Imaging studies demonstrated a relatively well-demarcated mass, measuring approximately 40 mm in diameter, located in the pancreatic tail. It was heterogeneously enhanced almost to the same degree as the surrounding pancreatic tissue in both the arterial and portal venous phases. We performed endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) using the Acquire

2 Article Endoscopic ultrasonography of duodenal aberrant pancreas: comparison with histology after endoscopic resection. 2015

Watanabe, Takashi / Aoyagi, Kunihiko / Tomioka, Yoshitaka / Ishibashi, Hideki / Nimura, Satoshi / Sakisaka, Shotaro. ·Department of Gastroenterology and Medicine, Fukuoka University School of Medicine, 7-45-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka, 814-0180, Japan. takashii@minf.med.fukuoka-u.ac.jp. · Department of Gastroenterology and Medicine, Fukuoka University School of Medicine, 7-45-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka, 814-0180, Japan. · Department of Pathology, Fukuoka University School of Medicine, Fukuoka, Japan. ·J Med Ultrason (2001) · Pubmed #26576585.

ABSTRACT: We present the case of a 45-year-old man with an aberrant pancreas in the duodenum. He was referred to our hospital for gastric cancer screening. On upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, a submucosal tumor was noted in the second portion of the duodenum; it was 10 mm in diameter, with a smooth surface and bridging fold. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) showed a hypoechoic lesion with small anechoic areas located in the third sonographic layer of the duodenum wall. To confirm the exact diagnosis, endoscopic resection was performed. The histological diagnosis was aberrant pancreas, Heinrich type II. The hypoechoic lesion and anechoic areas on EUS findings clearly corresponded with pancreatic acinus cells and duct dilation on histological findings, respectively. EUS findings are useful to diagnosis a duodenal aberrant pancreas that has ductal structures.

3 Article Consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds (sea vegetables) and pancreatic cancer risk: the Ohsaki Cohort Study. 2014

Shigihara, Michiko / Obara, Taku / Nagai, Masato / Sugawara, Yumi / Watanabe, Takashi / Kakizaki, Masako / Nishino, Yoshikazu / Kuriyama, Shinichi / Tsuji, Ichiro. ·Division of Molecular Epidemiology, Environment and Genome Research Center, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan; Division of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Forensic Medicine, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan. Electronic address: shigi@med.tohoku.ac.jp. · Division of Molecular Epidemiology, Environment and Genome Research Center, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Public Health and Forensic Medicine, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan. · Division of Epidemiology, Miyagi Prefectural Cancer Research Center, Natori, Japan. ·Cancer Epidemiol · Pubmed #24522236.

ABSTRACT: Studies on the effects of consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds on the incidence of pancreatic cancer are not conclusive. We examined the association (if any) between the consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds and the risk of pancreatic cancer in Japan. Data from 32,859 participants registered in the Ohsaki National Health Insurance Cohort Study who were 40-79 years old and free of cancer at baseline were analyzed. Consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds was assessed at baseline using a self-administered food frequency questionnaire (containing 40 items). Incidences of pancreatic cancer were identified by computer linkage with the Miyagi Prefectural Cancer Registry. During 11 years of follow-up, 137 pancreatic cancers (67 men and 70 women) were identified. The hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of pancreatic cancer risk for the highest versus the lowest tertile were 0.82 (0.40-1.68, trend P=0.57) in men and 0.64 (0.35-1.20, trend P=0.22) in women for total consumption of fruits, 0.89 (0.46-1.73, trend P=0.76) in men and 0.67 (0.33-1.35, trend P=0.23) in women for total consumption of vegetables, and 0.92 (0.46-1.84, trend P=0.81) in men for consumption of seaweeds (results for the consumption of seaweeds in women were not analyzed because of poor reliability), respectively. Total consumption of fruits, vegetables, and seaweeds was not associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer.

4 Article Association of body mass index and risk of death from pancreas cancer in Asians: findings from the Asia Cohort Consortium. 2013

Lin, Yingsong / Fu, Rong / Grant, Eric / Chen, Yu / Lee, Jung Eun / Gupta, Prakash C / Ramadas, Kunnambath / Inoue, Manami / Tsugane, Shoichiro / Gao, Yu-Tang / Tamakoshi, Akiko / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Ozasa, Kotaro / Tsuji, Ichiro / Kakizaki, Masako / Tanaka, Hideo / Chen, Chien-Jen / Yoo, Keun-Young / Ahn, Yoon-Ok / Ahsan, Habibul / Pednekar, Mangesh S / Sauvaget, Catherine / Sasazuki, Shizuka / Yang, Gong / Xiang, Yong-Bing / Ohishi, Waka / Watanabe, Takashi / Nishino, Yoshikazu / Matsuo, Keitaro / You, San-Lin / Park, Sue K / Kim, Dong-Hyun / Parvez, Faruque / Rolland, Betsy / McLerran, Dale / Sinha, Rashmi / Boffetta, Paolo / Zheng, Wei / Thornquist, Mark / Feng, Ziding / Kang, Daehee / Potter, John D. ·Department of Public Health, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi, Japan. linys@aichi-med-u.ac.jp ·Eur J Cancer Prev · Pubmed #23044748.

ABSTRACT: We aimed to examine the association between BMI and the risk of death from pancreas cancer in a pooled analysis of data from the Asia Cohort Consortium. The data for this pooled analysis included 883 529 men and women from 16 cohort studies in Asian countries. Cox proportional-hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for pancreas cancer mortality in relation to BMI. Seven predefined BMI categories (<18.5, 18.5-19.9, 20.0-22.4, 22.5-24.9, 25.0-27.4, 27.5-29.9, ≥ 30) were used in the analysis, with BMI of 22.5-24.9 serving as the reference group. The multivariable analyses were adjusted for known risk factors, including age, smoking, and a history of diabetes. We found no statistically significant overall association between each BMI category and the risk of death from pancreas cancer in all Asians, and obesity was unrelated to the risk of mortality in both East Asians and South Asians. Age, smoking, and a history of diabetes did not modify the association between BMI and the risk of death from pancreas cancer. In planned subgroup analyses among East Asians, an increased risk of death from pancreas cancer among those with a BMI less than 18.5 was observed for individuals with a history of diabetes; hazard ratio=2.01 (95% confidence interval: 1.01-4.00) (P for interaction=0.07). The data do not support an association between BMI and the risk of death from pancreas cancer in these Asian populations.

5 Article Pancreatic stellate cells promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition in pancreatic cancer cells. 2010

Kikuta, Kazuhiro / Masamune, Atsushi / Watanabe, Takashi / Ariga, Hiroyuki / Itoh, Hiromichi / Hamada, Shin / Satoh, Kennichi / Egawa, Shinichi / Unno, Michiaki / Shimosegawa, Tooru. ·Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan. ·Biochem Biophys Res Commun · Pubmed #21081113.

ABSTRACT: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Because epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in the progression of pancreatic cancer, we hypothesized that PSCs promote EMT in pancreatic cancer cells. Panc-1 and SUIT-2 pancreatic cancer cells were indirectly co-cultured with human PSCs isolated from patients undergoing operation for pancreatic cancer. The expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers was examined by real-time PCR and immunofluorescent staining. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was examined by scratch and two-chamber assays. Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and a scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. The expression of E-cadherin, cytokeratin 19, and membrane-associated β-catenin was decreased, whereas vimentin and Snail (Snai-1) expression was increased more in cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs than in mono-cultured cells. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was increased by co-culture with PSCs. The PSC-induced decrease of E-cadherin expression was not altered by treatment with anti-TGF-β-neutralizing antibody, excluding a central role of TGF-β in this process. In conclusion, PSCs promoted EMT in pancreatic cancer cells suggesting a novel mechanism by which PSCs contribute to the aggressive behavior of pancreatic cancer cells.