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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by N. Wareham
Based on 3 articles published since 2010
(Why 3 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, N. Wareham wrote the following 3 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Dietary intake of acrylamide and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. 2013

Obón-Santacana, M / Slimani, N / Lujan-Barroso, L / Travier, N / Hallmans, G / Freisling, H / Ferrari, P / Boutron-Ruault, M C / Racine, A / Clavel, F / Saieva, C / Pala, V / Tumino, R / Mattiello, A / Vineis, P / Argüelles, M / Ardanaz, E / Amiano, P / Navarro, C / Sánchez, M J / Molina Montes, E / Key, T / Khaw, K-T / Wareham, N / Peeters, P H / Trichopoulou, A / Bamia, C / Trichopoulos, D / Boeing, H / Kaaks, R / Katzke, V / Ye, W / Sund, M / Ericson, U / Wirfält, E / Overvad, K / Tjønneland, A / Olsen, A / Skeie, G / Åsli, L A / Weiderpass, E / Riboli, E / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Duell, E J. ·Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #23857962.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In 1994, acrylamide (AA) was classified as a probable human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. In 2002, AA was discovered at relatively high concentrations in some starchy, plant-based foods cooked at high temperatures. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A prospective analysis was conducted to evaluate the association between the dietary intake of AA and ductal adenocarcinoma of the exocrine pancreatic cancer (PC) risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort using Cox regression modeling. EPIC includes >500,000 men and women aged 35-75 at enrollment from 10 European countries. AA intake was estimated for each participant by combining questionnaire-based food consumption data with a harmonized AA database derived from the EU monitoring database of AA levels in foods, and evaluated in quintiles and continuously. RESULTS: After a mean follow-up of 11 years, 865 first incident adenocarcinomas of the exocrine pancreas were observed and included in the present analysis. At baseline, the mean dietary AA intake in EPIC was 26.22 µg/day. No overall association was found between continuous or quintiles of dietary AA intake and PC risk in EPIC (HR:0.95, 95%CI:0.89-1.01 per 10 µg/day). There was no effect measure modification by smoking status, sex, diabetes, alcohol intake or geographic region. However, there was an inverse association (HR: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.61-0.88 per 10 µg/day) between AA intake and PC risk in obese persons as defined using the body mass index (BMI, ≥ 30 kg/m(2)), but not when body fatness was defined using waist and hip circumference or their ratio. CONCLUSIONS: Dietary intake of AA was not associated with an increased risk of PC in the EPIC cohort.

2 Article Inflammation marker and risk of pancreatic cancer: a nested case-control study within the EPIC cohort. 2012

Grote, V A / Kaaks, R / Nieters, A / Tjønneland, A / Halkjær, J / Overvad, K / Skjelbo Nielsen, M R / Boutron-Ruault, M C / Clavel-Chapelon, F / Racine, A / Teucher, B / Becker, S / Pischon, T / Boeing, H / Trichopoulou, A / Cassapa, C / Stratigakou, V / Palli, D / Krogh, V / Tumino, R / Vineis, P / Panico, S / Rodríguez, L / Duell, E J / Sánchez, M-J / Dorronsoro, M / Navarro, C / Gurrea, A B / Siersema, P D / Peeters, P H M / Ye, W / Sund, M / Lindkvist, B / Johansen, D / Khaw, K-T / Wareham, N / Allen, N E / Travis, R C / Fedirko, V / Jenab, M / Michaud, D S / Chuang, S-C / Romaguera, D / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Rohrmann, S. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology (c020), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 581, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #22617158.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Established risk factors for pancreatic cancer include smoking, long-standing diabetes, high body fatness, and chronic pancreatitis, all of which can be characterised by aspects of inflammatory processes. However, prospective studies investigating the relation between inflammatory markers and pancreatic cancer risk are scarce. METHODS: We conducted a nested case-control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, measuring prediagnostic blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and soluble receptors of tumour necrosis factor-α (sTNF-R1, R2) in 455 pancreatic cancer cases and 455 matched controls. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using conditional logistic regression models. RESULTS: None of the inflammatory markers were significantly associated with risk of pancreatic cancer overall, although a borderline significant association was observed for higher circulating sTNF-R2 (crude OR=1.52 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.97-2.39), highest vs lowest quartile). In women, however, higher sTNF-R1 levels were significantly associated with risk of pancreatic cancer (crude OR=1.97 (95% CI 1.02-3.79)). For sTNF-R2, risk associations seemed to be stronger for diabetic individuals and those with a higher BMI. CONCLUSION: Prospectively, CRP and IL-6 do not seem to have a role in our study with respect to risk of pancreatic cancer, whereas sTNF-R1 seemed to be a risk factor in women and sTNF-R2 might be a mediator in the risk relationship between overweight and diabetes with pancreatic cancer. Further large prospective studies are needed to clarify the role of proinflammatory proteins and cytokines in the pathogenesis of exocrine pancreatic cancer.

3 Article Diabetes mellitus, glycated haemoglobin and C-peptide levels in relation to pancreatic cancer risk: a study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. 2011

Grote, V A / Rohrmann, S / Nieters, A / Dossus, L / Tjønneland, A / Halkjær, J / Overvad, K / Fagherazzi, G / Boutron-Ruault, M C / Morois, S / Teucher, B / Becker, S / Sluik, D / Boeing, H / Trichopoulou, A / Lagiou, P / Trichopoulos, D / Palli, D / Pala, V / Tumino, R / Vineis, P / Panico, S / Rodríguez, L / Duell, E J / Molina-Montes, E / Dorronsoro, M / Huerta, J M / Ardanaz, E / Jeurnink, S M / Beulens, J W J / Peeters, P H M / Sund, M / Ye, W / Lindkvist, B / Johansen, D / Khaw, K T / Wareham, N / Allen, N / Crowe, F / Jenab, M / Romieu, I / Michaud, D S / Riboli, E / Romaguera, D / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Kaaks, R. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology c020, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 581, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. ·Diabetologia · Pubmed #21953276.

ABSTRACT: AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: There has been long-standing debate about whether diabetes is a causal risk factor for pancreatic cancer or a consequence of tumour development. Prospective epidemiological studies have shown variable relationships between pancreatic cancer risk and blood markers of glucose and insulin metabolism, overall and as a function of lag times between marker measurements (blood donation) and date of tumour diagnosis. METHODS: Pre-diagnostic levels of HbA(1c) and C-peptide were measured for 466 participants with pancreatic cancer and 466 individually matched controls within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate ORs for pancreatic cancer. RESULTS: Pancreatic cancer risk gradually increased with increasing pre-diagnostic HbA(1c) levels up to an OR of 2.42 (95% CI 1.33, 4.39 highest [≥ 6.5%, 48 mmol/mol] vs lowest [≤ 5.4%, 36 mmol/mol] category), even for individuals with HbA(1c) levels within the non-diabetic range. C-peptide levels showed no significant relationship with pancreatic cancer risk, irrespective of fasting status. Analyses showed no clear trends towards increasing hyperglycaemia (as marked by HbA(1c) levels) or reduced pancreatic beta cell responsiveness (as marked by C-peptide levels) with decreasing time intervals from blood donation to cancer diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Our data on HbA(1c) show that individuals who develop exocrine pancreatic cancer tend to have moderate increases in HbA(1c) levels, relatively independently of obesity and insulin resistance-the classic and major risk factors for type 2 diabetes. While there is no strong difference by lag time, more data are needed on this in order to reach a firm conclusion.