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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Yingxiao Wang
Based on 5 articles published since 2010
(Why 5 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Yingxiao Wang wrote the following 5 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article CAF hierarchy driven by pancreatic cancer cell p53-status creates a pro-metastatic and chemoresistant environment via perlecan. 2019

Vennin, Claire / Mélénec, Pauline / Rouet, Romain / Nobis, Max / Cazet, Aurélie S / Murphy, Kendelle J / Herrmann, David / Reed, Daniel A / Lucas, Morghan C / Warren, Sean C / Elgundi, Zehra / Pinese, Mark / Kalna, Gabriella / Roden, Daniel / Samuel, Monisha / Zaratzian, Anaiis / Grey, Shane T / Da Silva, Andrew / Leung, Wilfred / Anonymous561018 / Mathivanan, Suresh / Wang, Yingxiao / Braithwaite, Anthony W / Christ, Daniel / Benda, Ales / Parkin, Ashleigh / Phillips, Phoebe A / Whitelock, John M / Gill, Anthony J / Sansom, Owen J / Croucher, David R / Parker, Benjamin L / Pajic, Marina / Morton, Jennifer P / Cox, Thomas R / Timpson, Paul. ·The Garvan Institute of Medical Research & The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Sydney, NSW, 2010, Australia. · St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2010, Australia. · Molecular Pathology department, the Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, 1066CX, the Netherlands. · Graduate school of Biomedical Engineering, University of New South Wales Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2052, Australia. · Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Glasgow Scotland, G61 BD, UK. · Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Microbiology, School of Life Sciences, La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC, 3086, Australia. · Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853, USA. · Department of Bioengineering, Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of California, San Diego, CA, 92121, USA. · Children's Medical Research Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia. · Department of Pathology, Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin, 9054, New Zealand. · Maurice Wilkins Centre, University of Otago, Dunedin, 9054, New Zealand. · Biomedical imaging facility, Lowy Cancer Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Pancreatic Cancer Translational Research Group, Lowy Cancer Research Centre, School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, 2052, Australia. · Australian Centre for Nanomedicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, 2052, Australia. · Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia. · NSW Health Pathology, Department of Anatomical Pathology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney, NSW, 2065, Australia. · Cancer Diagnosis and Pathology Research Group, Kolling Institute of Medical Research, St Leonards, NSW, 2065, Australia. · Schools of Life and Environmental Sciences, the Charles Perkin Centre, the University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia. · The Garvan Institute of Medical Research & The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Sydney, NSW, 2010, Australia. t.cox@garvan.org.au. · St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2010, Australia. t.cox@garvan.org.au. · The Garvan Institute of Medical Research & The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Sydney, NSW, 2010, Australia. p.timpson@garvan.org.au. · St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2010, Australia. p.timpson@garvan.org.au. ·Nat Commun · Pubmed #31406163.

ABSTRACT: Heterogeneous subtypes of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) coexist within pancreatic cancer tissues and can both promote and restrain disease progression. Here, we interrogate how cancer cells harboring distinct alterations in p53 manipulate CAFs. We reveal the existence of a p53-driven hierarchy, where cancer cells with a gain-of-function (GOF) mutant p53 educate a dominant population of CAFs that establish a pro-metastatic environment for GOF and null p53 cancer cells alike. We also demonstrate that CAFs educated by null p53 cancer cells may be reprogrammed by either GOF mutant p53 cells or their CAFs. We identify perlecan as a key component of this pro-metastatic environment. Using intravital imaging, we observe that these dominant CAFs delay cancer cell response to chemotherapy. Lastly, we reveal that depleting perlecan in the stroma combined with chemotherapy prolongs mouse survival, supporting it as a potential target for anti-stromal therapies in pancreatic cancer.

2 Article Removing physiological motion from intravital and clinical functional imaging data. 2018

Warren, Sean C / Nobis, Max / Magenau, Astrid / Mohammed, Yousuf H / Herrmann, David / Moran, Imogen / Vennin, Claire / Conway, James Rw / Mélénec, Pauline / Cox, Thomas R / Wang, Yingxiao / Morton, Jennifer P / Welch, Heidi Ce / Strathdee, Douglas / Anderson, Kurt I / Phan, Tri Giang / Roberts, Michael S / Timpson, Paul. ·Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. · St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. · Therapeutics Research Centre, Diamantina Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, Woolloongabba, Australia. · Immunology Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Bioengineering, Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, United States. · Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Signalling Programme, Babraham Institute, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Francis Crick Institute, London, United Kingdom. · Therapeutics Research Centre, School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia. ·Elife · Pubmed #29985127.

ABSTRACT: Intravital microscopy can provide unique insights into the function of biological processes in a native context. However, physiological motion caused by peristalsis, respiration and the heartbeat can present a significant challenge, particularly for functional readouts such as fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), which require longer acquisition times to obtain a quantitative readout. Here, we present and benchmark

3 Article Intravital Imaging to Monitor Therapeutic Response in Moving Hypoxic Regions Resistant to PI3K Pathway Targeting in Pancreatic Cancer. 2018

Conway, James R W / Warren, Sean C / Herrmann, David / Murphy, Kendelle J / Cazet, Aurélie S / Vennin, Claire / Shearer, Robert F / Killen, Monica J / Magenau, Astrid / Mélénec, Pauline / Pinese, Mark / Nobis, Max / Zaratzian, Anaiis / Boulghourjian, Alice / Da Silva, Andrew M / Del Monte-Nieto, Gonzalo / Adam, Arne S A / Harvey, Richard P / Haigh, Jody J / Wang, Yingxiao / Croucher, David R / Sansom, Owen J / Pajic, Marina / Caldon, C Elizabeth / Morton, Jennifer P / Timpson, Paul. ·Garvan Institute of Medical Research and The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia. · Garvan Institute of Medical Research and The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia; St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of NSW, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia. · St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of NSW, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia; Developmental and Stem Cell Biology Division, Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia. · Developmental and Stem Cell Biology Division, Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia. · St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of NSW, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia; Developmental and Stem Cell Biology Division, Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia; School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2033, Australia. · Australian Centre for Blood Diseases, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia. · Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. · Garvan Institute of Medical Research and The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia; St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of NSW, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia; School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. · Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK; Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G61 1QH, UK. · Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK; Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G61 1QH, UK. Electronic address: j.morton@beatson.gla.ac.uk. · Garvan Institute of Medical Research and The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia; St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of NSW, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia. Electronic address: p.timpson@garvan.org.au. ·Cell Rep · Pubmed #29898401.

ABSTRACT: Application of advanced intravital imaging facilitates dynamic monitoring of pathway activity upon therapeutic inhibition. Here, we assess resistance to therapeutic inhibition of the PI3K pathway within the hypoxic microenvironment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and identify a phenomenon whereby pronounced hypoxia-induced resistance is observed for three clinically relevant inhibitors. To address this clinical problem, we have mapped tumor hypoxia by both immunofluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging of oxygen-sensitive nanoparticles and demonstrate that these hypoxic regions move transiently around the tumor. To overlay this microenvironmental information with drug response, we applied a FRET biosensor for Akt activity, which is a key effector of the PI3K pathway. Performing dual intravital imaging of drug response in different tumor compartments, we demonstrate an improved drug response to a combination therapy using the dual mTORC1/2 inhibitor AZD2014 with the hypoxia-activated pro-drug TH-302.

4 Article Transient tissue priming via ROCK inhibition uncouples pancreatic cancer progression, sensitivity to chemotherapy, and metastasis. 2017

Vennin, Claire / Chin, Venessa T / Warren, Sean C / Lucas, Morghan C / Herrmann, David / Magenau, Astrid / Melenec, Pauline / Walters, Stacey N / Del Monte-Nieto, Gonzalo / Conway, James R W / Nobis, Max / Allam, Amr H / McCloy, Rachael A / Currey, Nicola / Pinese, Mark / Boulghourjian, Alice / Zaratzian, Anaiis / Adam, Arne A S / Heu, Celine / Nagrial, Adnan M / Chou, Angela / Steinmann, Angela / Drury, Alison / Froio, Danielle / Giry-Laterriere, Marc / Harris, Nathanial L E / Phan, Tri / Jain, Rohit / Weninger, Wolfgang / McGhee, Ewan J / Whan, Renee / Johns, Amber L / Samra, Jaswinder S / Chantrill, Lorraine / Gill, Anthony J / Kohonen-Corish, Maija / Harvey, Richard P / Biankin, Andrew V / Anonymous3070902 / Evans, T R Jeffry / Anderson, Kurt I / Grey, Shane T / Ormandy, Christopher J / Gallego-Ortega, David / Wang, Yingxiao / Samuel, Michael S / Sansom, Owen J / Burgess, Andrew / Cox, Thomas R / Morton, Jennifer P / Pajic, Marina / Timpson, Paul. ·The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. · St. Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. · Developmental and Stem Cell Biology Division, Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. · Biomedical Imaging Facility, Mark Wainwright Analytical Centre, Lowy Cancer Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia. · Department of Pathology, St. Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. · Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522, Australia. · Immune Imaging Program, Centenary Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia. · University of Sydney Medical School, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia. · Department of Dermatology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales 2050, Australia. · Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Glasgow, Scotland G61 BD, U.K. · Cancer Diagnosis and Pathology Research Group, Kolling Institute of Medical Research and Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales 2065, Australia. · University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia. · Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative. · Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales 2065, Australia. · Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centre, Campbelltown Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales 2560, Australia. · School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, Penrith, Sydney, New South Wales 2751, Australia. · School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Scotland G61 BD, U.K. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Scotland G61 BD, U.K. · Department of Bioengineering, Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA 92121, USA. · Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology and University of South Australia School of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. m.pajic@garvan.org.au p.timpson@garvan.org.au. ·Sci Transl Med · Pubmed #28381539.

ABSTRACT: The emerging standard of care for patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer is a combination of cytotoxic drugs gemcitabine and Abraxane, but patient response remains moderate. Pancreatic cancer development and metastasis occur in complex settings, with reciprocal feedback from microenvironmental cues influencing both disease progression and drug response. Little is known about how sequential dual targeting of tumor tissue tension and vasculature before chemotherapy can affect tumor response. We used intravital imaging to assess how transient manipulation of the tumor tissue, or "priming," using the pharmaceutical Rho kinase inhibitor Fasudil affects response to chemotherapy. Intravital Förster resonance energy transfer imaging of a cyclin-dependent kinase 1 biosensor to monitor the efficacy of cytotoxic drugs revealed that priming improves pancreatic cancer response to gemcitabine/Abraxane at both primary and secondary sites. Transient priming also sensitized cells to shear stress and impaired colonization efficiency and fibrotic niche remodeling within the liver, three important features of cancer spread. Last, we demonstrate a graded response to priming in stratified patient-derived tumors, indicating that fine-tuned tissue manipulation before chemotherapy may offer opportunities in both primary and metastatic targeting of pancreatic cancer.

5 Article Intravital FLIM-FRET imaging reveals dasatinib-induced spatial control of src in pancreatic cancer. 2013

Nobis, Max / McGhee, Ewan J / Morton, Jennifer P / Schwarz, Juliane P / Karim, Saadia A / Quinn, Jean / Edward, Mike / Campbell, Andrew D / McGarry, Lynn C / Evans, T R Jeffry / Brunton, Valerie G / Frame, Margaret C / Carragher, Neil O / Wang, Yingxiao / Sansom, Owen J / Timpson, Paul / Anderson, Kurt I. ·The Beatson Institute for Cancer Research, Glasgow; Section of Dermatology, School of Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. ·Cancer Res · Pubmed #23749641.

ABSTRACT: Cancer invasion and metastasis occur in a complex three-dimensional (3D) environment, with reciprocal feedback from the surrounding host tissue and vasculature-governing behavior. In this study, we used a novel intravital method that revealed spatiotemporal regulation of Src activity in response to the anti-invasive Src inhibitor dasatinib. A fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FLIM-FRET) Src biosensor was used to monitor drug-targeting efficacy in a transgenic p53-mutant mouse model of pancreatic cancer. In contrast to conventional techniques, FLIM-FRET analysis allowed for accurate, time-dependent, live monitoring of drug efficacy and clearance in live tumors. In 3D organotypic cultures, we showed that a spatially distinct gradient of Src activity exists within invading tumor cells, governed by the depth of penetration into complex matrices. In parallel, this gradient was also found to exist within live tumors, where Src activity is enhanced at the invasive border relative to the tumor cortex. Upon treatment with dasatinib, we observed a switch in activity at the invasive borders, correlating with impaired metastatic capacity in vivo. Src regulation was governed by the proximity of cells to the host vasculature, as cells distal to the vasculature were regulated differentially in response to drug treatment compared with cells proximal to the vasculature. Overall, our results in live tumors revealed that a threshold of drug penetrance exists in vivo and that this can be used to map areas of poor drug-targeting efficiency within specific tumor microenvironments. We propose that using FLIM-FRET in this capacity could provide a useful preclinical tool in animal models before clinical translation.