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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Nicole Vincent Jordan
Based on 2 articles published since 2010
(Why 2 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Nicole Vincent Jordan wrote the following 2 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Stromal Microenvironment Shapes the Intratumoral Architecture of Pancreatic Cancer. 2019

Ligorio, Matteo / Sil, Srinjoy / Malagon-Lopez, Jose / Nieman, Linda T / Misale, Sandra / Di Pilato, Mauro / Ebright, Richard Y / Karabacak, Murat N / Kulkarni, Anupriya S / Liu, Ann / Vincent Jordan, Nicole / Franses, Joseph W / Philipp, Julia / Kreuzer, Johannes / Desai, Niyati / Arora, Kshitij S / Rajurkar, Mihir / Horwitz, Elad / Neyaz, Azfar / Tai, Eric / Magnus, Neelima K C / Vo, Kevin D / Yashaswini, Chittampalli N / Marangoni, Francesco / Boukhali, Myriam / Fatherree, Jackson P / Damon, Leah J / Xega, Kristina / Desai, Rushil / Choz, Melissa / Bersani, Francesca / Langenbucher, Adam / Thapar, Vishal / Morris, Robert / Wellner, Ulrich F / Schilling, Oliver / Lawrence, Michael S / Liss, Andrew S / Rivera, Miguel N / Deshpande, Vikram / Benes, Cyril H / Maheswaran, Shyamala / Haber, Daniel A / Fernandez-Del-Castillo, Carlos / Ferrone, Cristina R / Haas, Wilhelm / Aryee, Martin J / Ting, David T. ·Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Division of Rheumatology, Allergy, and Immunology, Center for Immunology and Inflammatory Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Center for Engineering in Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Clinic of Surgery, UKSH Campus L├╝beck, Germany. · Institute of Pathology, University Medical Center Freiburg, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Division of Rheumatology, Allergy, and Immunology, Center for Immunology and Inflammatory Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, USA. · Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: aryee.martin@mgh.harvard.edu. · Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Electronic address: dting1@mgh.harvard.edu. ·Cell · Pubmed #31155233.

ABSTRACT: Single-cell technologies have described heterogeneity across tissues, but the spatial distribution and forces that drive single-cell phenotypes have not been well defined. Combining single-cell RNA and protein analytics in studying the role of stromal cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in modulating heterogeneity in pancreatic cancer (pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma [PDAC]) model systems, we have identified significant single-cell population shifts toward invasive epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and proliferative (PRO) phenotypes linked with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling. Using high-content digital imaging of RNA in situ hybridization in 195 PDAC tumors, we quantified these EMT and PRO subpopulations in 319,626 individual cancer cells that can be classified within the context of distinct tumor gland "units." Tumor gland typing provided an additional layer of intratumoral heterogeneity that was associated with differences in stromal abundance and clinical outcomes. This demonstrates the impact of the stroma in shaping tumor architecture by altering inherent patterns of tumor glands in human PDAC.

2 Article Single-cell RNA sequencing identifies extracellular matrix gene expression by pancreatic circulating tumor cells. 2014

Ting, David T / Wittner, Ben S / Ligorio, Matteo / Vincent Jordan, Nicole / Shah, Ajay M / Miyamoto, David T / Aceto, Nicola / Bersani, Francesca / Brannigan, Brian W / Xega, Kristina / Ciciliano, Jordan C / Zhu, Huili / MacKenzie, Olivia C / Trautwein, Julie / Arora, Kshitij S / Shahid, Mohammad / Ellis, Haley L / Qu, Na / Bardeesy, Nabeel / Rivera, Miguel N / Deshpande, Vikram / Ferrone, Cristina R / Kapur, Ravi / Ramaswamy, Sridhar / Shioda, Toshi / Toner, Mehmet / Maheswaran, Shyamala / Haber, Daniel A. ·Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, 16126 Genoa, Italy. · Center for Engineering in Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Center for Engineering in Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Electronic address: maheswaran@helix.mgh.harvard.edu. · Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, USA. Electronic address: haber@helix.mgh.harvard.edu. ·Cell Rep · Pubmed #25242334.

ABSTRACT: Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are shed from primary tumors into the bloodstream, mediating the hematogenous spread of cancer to distant organs. To define their composition, we compared genome-wide expression profiles of CTCs with matched primary tumors in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer, isolating individual CTCs using epitope-independent microfluidic capture, followed by single-cell RNA sequencing. CTCs clustered separately from primary tumors and tumor-derived cell lines, showing low-proliferative signatures, enrichment for the stem-cell-associated gene Aldh1a2, biphenotypic expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers, and expression of Igfbp5, a gene transcript enriched at the epithelial-stromal interface. Mouse as well as human pancreatic CTCs exhibit a very high expression of stromal-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, including SPARC, whose knockdown in cancer cells suppresses cell migration and invasiveness. The aberrant expression by CTCs of stromal ECM genes points to their contribution of microenvironmental signals for the spread of cancer to distant organs.