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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Enrico Vasile
Based on 22 articles published since 2010
(Why 22 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, E. Vasile wrote the following 22 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Patients Selection for Immunotherapy in Solid Tumors: Overcome the Naïve Vision of a Single Biomarker. 2019

Signorelli, Diego / Giannatempo, Patrizia / Grazia, Giulia / Aiello, Marco Maria / Bertolini, Federica / Mirabile, Aurora / Buti, Sebastiano / Vasile, Enrico / Scotti, Vieri / Pisapia, Pasquale / Cona, Maria Silvia / Rolfo, Christian / Malapelle, Umberto / Anonymous791016. ·Medical Oncology Department, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Via Venezian 1, 20133, Milan, Italy. · Fondazione IRCCS, Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Via Venezian 1, 20133, Milan, Italy. · Department of Research, Human Tumors Immunobiology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Via Venezian 1, 20133, Milan, Italy. · Oncology Unit, Policlinico - Vittorio Emanuele Hospital, Via Salvatore Citelli 6, 95124, Catania, Italy. · University Hospital of Modena, Via del Pozzo 71, 41124, Modena, Italy. · Department of Medical Oncology, IRCCS San Raffaele Hospital, Via Olgettina 60, 20132, Milan, Italy. · Medical Oncology Unit, University Hospital of Parma, Via Gramsci 14, 43126, Parma, Italy. · Medical Oncology, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Via Roma 67, 56126, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Careggi, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla 3, 50134, Florence, Italy. · Department of Public Health, University of Naples "Federico II", via Sergio Pansini 5, 80131, Naples, Italy. · Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, 655 W Baltimore S, Baltimore, 21201, Maryland, USA. ·Biomed Res Int · Pubmed #31179334.

ABSTRACT: Immunotherapy, and in particular immune-checkpoints blockade therapy (ICB), represents a new pillar in cancer therapy. Antibodies targeting Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and Programmed Death 1 (PD-1)/Programmed Death Ligand-1 (PD-L1) demonstrated a relevant clinical value in a large number of solid tumors, leading to an improvement of progression free survival and overall survival in comparison to standard chemotherapy. However, across different solid malignancies, the immune-checkpoints inhibitors efficacy is limited to a relative small number of patients and, for this reason, the identification of positive or negative predictive biomarkers represents an urgent need. Despite the expression of PD-L1 was largely investigated in various malignancies, (i.e., melanoma, head and neck malignancies, urothelial and renal carcinoma, metastatic colorectal cancer, and pancreatic cancer) as a biomarker for ICB treatment-patients selection, it showed an important, but still imperfect, role as positive predictor of response only in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Importantly, other tumor and/or microenvironments related characteristics are currently under clinical evaluation, in combination or in substitution of PD-L1 expression. In particular, tumor-infiltrating immune cells, gene expression analysis, mismatch- repair deficiency, and tumor mutational landscape may play a central role in predicting clinical benefits of CTLA-4 and/or PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint inhibitors. In this review, we will focus on the clinical evaluation of emerging biomarkers and how these may improve the naïve vision of a single- feature patients-based selection.

2 Review Multimodal treatment of resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2017

Silvestris, Nicola / Brunetti, Oronzo / Vasile, Enrico / Cellini, Francesco / Cataldo, Ivana / Pusceddu, Valeria / Cattaneo, Monica / Partelli, Stefano / Scartozzi, Mario / Aprile, Giuseppe / Casadei Gardini, Andrea / Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe / Valentini, Vincenzo / Scarpa, Aldo / Falconi, Massimo / Calabrese, Angela / Lorusso, Vito / Reni, Michele / Cascinu, Stefano. ·Medical Oncology Unit, Cancer Institute "Giovanni Paolo II", Bari, Italy. Electronic address: n.silvestris@oncologico.bari.it. · Medical Oncology Unit, Cancer Institute "Giovanni Paolo II", Bari, Italy. Electronic address: dr.oronzo.brunetti@tiscali.it. · Department of Oncology, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Pisa, Italy. Electronic address: e.vasile@ao.pisa.toscana.it. · Radiation Oncology Department, Gemelli ART, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma, Italy. Electronic address: francesco.cellini@uniroma3.it. · ARC-NET Research Centre, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. Electronic address: cataldo.ivana@gmail.com. · Medical Oncology Unit, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. Electronic address: oncologiamedica2reparto@gmail.com. · Department of Medical Oncology, University and General Hospital, Udine, Italy. Electronic address: aprile83@gmail.com. · Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Centre, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 'Vita-Salute' University, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: partelli.stefano@hsr.it. · Medical Oncology Unit, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. Electronic address: marioscartozzi@gmail.com. · Department of Medical Oncology, University and General Hospital, Udine, Italy; Department of Medical Oncology, General Hospital of Vicenza, Vicenza, Italy. Electronic address: aprile.giuseppe@aoud.sanita.fvg.it. · Medical Oncology Unit, IRCCS, Meldola, Italy. Electronic address: casadeigardini@gmail.com. · Radiation Oncology Center, Dept. of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine - DIMES, University of Bologna, Italy. Electronic address: alessio.morganti2@unibo.it. · Radiation Oncology Department, Gemelli ART, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma, Italy. Electronic address: vincenzo.valentini@unicatt.it. · ARC-NET Research Centre, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. Electronic address: aldo.scarpa@univr.it. · Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Centre, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 'Vita-Salute' University, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: falconi.massimo@hsr.it. · Radiology Unit, Cancer Institute "Giovanni Paolo II", Bari, Italy. Electronic address: acalabrese22@gmail.com. · Medical Oncology Unit, Cancer Institute "Giovanni Paolo II", Bari, Italy. Electronic address: vito.lorusso@oncologico.bari.it. · Medical Oncology Department, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: reni.michele@hsr.it. · Modena Cancer Center, Policlinico di Modena Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Italy. Electronic address: cascinu@yahoo.com. ·Crit Rev Oncol Hematol · Pubmed #28259290.

ABSTRACT: After a timing preoperative staging, treatment of resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) includes surgery and adjuvant therapies, the former representing the initial therapeutic option and the latter aiming to reduce the incidence of both distant metastases (chemotherapy) and locoregional failures (chemoradiotherapy). Herein, we provide a critical overview on the role of multimodal treatment in PDAC and on new opportunities related to current more active poli-chemotherapy regimens, targeted therapies, and the more recent immunotherapy approaches. Moreover, an analysis of pathological markers and clinical features able to help clinicians in the selection of the best therapeutic strategy will be discussed. Lastly, the role of neoadjuvant treatment of initially resectable disease will be considered mostly in patients whose malignancy shows morphological but not clinical or biological criteria of resectability. Depending on the results of these investigational studies, today a multidisciplinary approach can offer the best address therapy for these patients.

3 Review FOLFIRINOX and translational studies: Towards personalized therapy in pancreatic cancer. 2016

Caparello, Chiara / Meijer, Laura L / Garajova, Ingrid / Falcone, Alfredo / Le Large, Tessa Y / Funel, Niccola / Kazemier, Geert / Peters, Godefridus J / Vasile, Enrico / Giovannetti, Elisa. ·Chiara Caparello, Alfredo Falcone, Niccola Funel, Enrico Vasile, Elisa Giovannetti, University Hospital of Pisa, 56124 Pisa, Italy. ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #27610011.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is an extremely aggressive disease; although progress has been made in the last few years, the prognosis of these patients remains dismal. FOLFIRINOX is now considered a standard treatment in first-line setting, since it demonstrated an improved overall and progression-free survival vs gemcitabine alone. However, the enthusiasm over the benefit of this three-drug regimen is tempered by the associated increased toxicity profile, and many efforts have been made to improve the feasibility of this schedule. After a more recent phase III trial showing an improved outcome over gemcitabine, the combination of gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel emerged as another standard first-line treatment. However, this treatment is also associated with more side effects. In addition, despite initial promising data on the predictive role of SPARC levels, recent studies showed that these levels are not associated with nab-paclitaxel efficacy. The choice to use this treatment over FOLFIRINOX is therefore a topic of debate, also because no validated biomarkers to guide FOLFIRINOX treatment are available. In the era of actionable mutations and target agents it would be desirable to identify molecular factors or biomarkers to predict response to therapy in order to maximize the efficacy of treatment and avoid useless toxic effects for non-responding patients. However, until today the milestone of treatment for pancreatic cancer remains chemotherapy combinations, without predictive or monitoring tools existing to optimize therapy. This review analyzes the state-of-the-art treatments, promises and limitations of targeted therapies, ongoing trials and future perspectives, including potential role of microRNAs as predictive biomarkers.

4 Review Second-line therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer: evaluation of prognostic factors and review of current literature. 2016

Caparello, Chiara / Vivaldi, Caterina / Fornaro, Lorenzo / Musettini, Gianna / Pasquini, Giulia / Catanese, Silvia / Masi, Gianluca / Lencioni, Monica / Falcone, Alfredo / Vasile, Enrico. ·Polo Oncologico, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Pisa, Italy. ·Future Oncol · Pubmed #26883177.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: FOLFIRINOX is a standard first-line treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer (aPC) and no accepted second-line regimen exists. MATERIAL & METHODS: We enrolled 71 aPC patients progressed to modified FOLFIRINOX (mFOLFIRINOX) treated with second-line chemotherapy. RESULTS: Five partial responses (7.1%) and 19 (27.1%) disease stabilizations were reported. After a median follow-up of 20.1 months, median progression-free survival was 2.5 months (95% CI: 2.1-2.9 months) and median overall survival was 6.2 months (95% CI: 5.3-7.1 months). At multivariate analysis, CA19.9 level ≥ 59 upper normal limit resulted associated with worse survival (hazard ratio: 2.32; 95% CI: 1.12-4.78; p = 0.023). CONCLUSION: Salvage chemotherapy could be useful for a subgroup of aPC patients. Prognostic factors might be helpful to identify patients with greater benefit.

5 Clinical Trial Adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (gemcitabine-based) in pancreatic adenocarcinoma: the Pisa University experience. 2017

Sainato, Aldo / Montrone, Sabrina / Pasqualetti, Francesco / Coppola, Marianna / Cernusco, Nunzia L V / Panichi, Marco / Gonnelli, Alessandra / Vasile, Enrico / Morganti, Riccardo / Falcone, Alfredo / Boggi, Ugo / Paiar, Fabiola. ·Department of Radiotherapy, Pisa University, Pisa - Italy. · Department of Medical Oncology, Pisa University, Pisa - Italy. · Biostatistical Consulting Department of Oncology, Pisa University, Pisa - Italy. · Department of Surgery and Transplants, Pisa University, Pisa - Italy. ·Tumori · Pubmed #28708229.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The role of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PA) is controversial. In this study we aimed to assess the feasibility, disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (gemcitabine based) in patients with resected PA and their correlation with prognostic factors. METHODS: 122 resected patients (stage ≥IIa) treated between February 1999 and December 2013 were analyzed. Two cycles of gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m2 on days 1, 8 and 15 every 28 days) were administered before concomitant radiotherapy (45 Gy/25 fractions) and chemotherapy (gemcitabine 300 mg/m2 weekly). RESULTS: Median follow-up was 22.7 months (range 4-109). Gastrointestinal toxicity (G3), neutropenia (G3-G4) and cardiac toxicity (G2-G3) were observed in 2.4%, 10.6% and 1.6% of patients, respectively. OS at 12, 24 and 60 months was 79%, 55% and 31%, respectively (median 25 months). Two-year OS in patients with postoperative Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≤70 and ≥80 was 37.1% and 62.3%, respectively (p<0.0001). OS was better in the group of patients with a postoperative CA 19-9 level ≤100 U/mL (p = 0.014). Median DFS was 17 months. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of concomitant gemcitabine and radiotherapy in patients with radically resected PA was well tolerated and associated with a low incidence of local recurrences. Five-year OS was significantly influenced by postoperative KPS and CA 19-9 values.

6 Article Early Tumor Shrinkage and Depth of Response Evaluation in Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer Treated with First Line Chemotherapy: An Observational Retrospective Cohort Study. 2019

Vivaldi, Caterina / Fornaro, Lorenzo / Cappelli, Carla / Pecora, Irene / Catanese, Silvia / Salani, Francesca / Cacciato Insilla, Andrea / Kauffmann, Emanuele / Donati, Francescamaria / Pasquini, Giulia / Massa, Valentina / Napoli, Niccolò / Lencioni, Monica / Boraschi, Piero / Campani, Daniela / Boggi, Ugo / Caramella, Davide / Falcone, Alfredo / Vasile, Enrico. ·Department of Translational Research and New Surgical and Medical Technologies, University of Pisa, Via Savi 6, 56126 Pisa, Italy. caterinavivaldi@gmail.com. · Division of Medical Oncology, Pisa University Hospital, Via Roma 67, 56126 Pisa, Italy. caterinavivaldi@gmail.com. · Division of Medical Oncology, Pisa University Hospital, Via Roma 67, 56126 Pisa, Italy. · Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Pisa University Hospital, Via Paradisa 2, 56124 Pisa, Italy. · Department of Surgical, Medical, Molecular Pathology and Critical Area, Division of Surgical Pathology, Pisa University Hospital, Via Paradisa 2, 56124 Pisa, Italy. · Department of Transplant and General Surgery, Pisa University Hospital, Via Paradisa 2, 56124 Pisa, Italy. · Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa, Via Paradisa 2, 56124 Pisa, Italy. · Department of Translational Research and New Surgical and Medical Technologies, University of Pisa, Via Savi 6, 56126 Pisa, Italy. ·Cancers (Basel) · Pubmed #31277449.

ABSTRACT: Early tumor shrinkage (ETS) and depth of response (DoR) predict favorable outcomes in metastatic colorectal cancer. We aim to evaluate their prognostic role in metastatic pancreatic cancer (PC) patients treated with first-line modified-FOLFIRINOX (FOLFOXIRI) or Gemcitabine + Nab-paclitaxel (GemNab). Hence, 138 patients were tested for ETS, defined as a ≥20% reduction in the sum of target lesions' longest diameters (SLD) after 6-8 weeks from baseline, and DoR, i.e., the maximum percentage shrinkage in the SLD from baseline. Association of ETS and DoR with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was assessed. ETS was reached in 49 patients (39.5% in the FOLFOXIRI, 29.8% in the GemNab group;

7 Article The Italian Rare Pancreatic Exocrine Cancer Initiative. 2019

Brunetti, Oronzo / Luchini, Claudio / Argentiero, Antonella / Tommasi, Stefania / Mangia, Anita / Aprile, Giuseppe / Marchetti, Paolo / Vasile, Enrico / Casadei Gardini, Andrea / Scartozzi, Mario / Barni, Sandro / Delfanti, Sara / De Vita, Fernando / Di Costanzo, Francesco / Milella, Michele / Cella, Chiara Alessandra / Berardi, Rossana / Cataldo, Ivana / Santini, Daniele / Doglioni, Claudio / Maiello, Evaristo / Lawlor, Rita T / Mazzaferro, Vincenzo / Lonardi, Sara / Giuliante, Felice / Brandi, Giovanni / Scarpa, Aldo / Cascinu, Stefano / Silvestris, Nicola. ·1 Medical Oncology Unit, IRCCS Cancer Institute "Giovanni Paolo II" of Bari, Bari, Italy. · 2 Department of Diagnostics and Public Health, Section of Pathology, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · 3 Molecular Diagnostics and Pharmacogenetics Unit, IRCCS Istituto Tumori "Giovanni Paolo II", Bari, Italy. · 4 Functional Biomorphology Laboratory, IRCCS-Istituto Tumori, Bari, Italy. · 5 Medical Oncology Unit, Hospital of Vicenza, Vicenza, Italy. · 6 Medical Oncology Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, University of Rome La Sapienza, Rome, Italy. · 7 Medical Oncology Unit, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · 8 Medical Oncology Unit, Scientific Institute of Romagna for the Study and Treatment of Cancer (IRST), Meldola, Italy. · 9 Medical Oncology Unit, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. · 10 Medical Oncology Unit, ASST Bergamo Ovest, Treviglio, Italy. · 11 Medical Oncology Unit, IRCCS Foundation Polyclinic San Matteo, Pavia, Italy. · 12 Medical Oncology Unit, II University of Naples, Naples, Italy. · 13 Medical Oncology Unit, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy. · 14 Medical Oncology Unit, "Regina Elena" National Cancer Institute, Rome, Italy. · 15 Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology and Neuroendocrine Tumors, European Institute of Oncology (IEO), Milan, Italy. · 16 Medical Oncology Unit, Polytechnic University of the Marche, "Ospedali Riuniti Ancona," Ancona, Italy. · 17 Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Policlinico GB Rossi, Verona, Italy. · 18 Medical Oncology Unit, University Campus Biomedico, Rome, Italy. · 19 Department of Medical Oncology, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · 20 Medical Oncology Unit, IRCCS "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza" Foundation, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · 21 Arc-Net Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · 22 Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery, University of Milan, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Fondazione IRCCS, Milan, Italy. · 23 Medical Oncology Unit, IRCCS Veneto Institute of Oncology (IOV), Padua, Italy. · 24 Hepatobiliary Surgery Unit, IRCCS A. Gemelli Polyclinic Foundation, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy. · 25 Oncology Unit, Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. · 26 Medical Oncology Unit, Modena Cancer Center, University Hospital of Modena, Modena, Italy. · 27 Scientific Direction, IRCCS Cancer Institute "Giovanni Paolo II" of Bari, Bari, Italy. ·Tumori · Pubmed #30967031.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Exocrine pancreatic cancers include common type pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and cystic neoplasms, which account for 85% and 10% of cases, respectively. The remaining 5% are rare histotypes, comprising adenosquamous carcinoma, acinar cell carcinoma, signet ring cell carcinoma, medullary carcinoma, pancreatoblastoma, hepatoid carcinoma, undifferentiated carcinoma and its variant with osteoclast-like giant cells, solid pseudopapillary carcinoma, and carcinosarcoma. Due to their low incidence, little knowledge is available on their clinical and molecular features as well as on treatment choices. The national initiative presented here aims at the molecular characterization of series of rare histotypes for which therapeutic and follow-up data are available. METHODS: A nationwide Italian Rare Pancreatic Cancer (IRaPaCa) task force whose first initiative is a multicentric retrospective study involving 21 Italian cancer centers to retrieve histologic material and clinical and treatment data of at least 100 patients with rare exocrine pancreatic cancers has been created. After histologic revision by a panel of expert pathologists, DNA and RNA from paraffin tissues will be investigated by next-generation sequencing using molecular pathway-oriented and immune-oriented mutational and expression profiling panels constructed availing of the information from the International Cancer Genome Consortium. Bioinformatic analysis of data will drive validation studies by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, as well as nanostring assays. CONCLUSIONS: We expect to gather novel data on rare pancreatic cancer types that will be useful to inform the design of therapeutic choices.

8 Article The emerging role of liquid biopsy in diagnosis, prognosis and treatment monitoring of pancreatic cancer. 2019

Rofi, Eleonora / Vivaldi, Caterina / Del Re, Marzia / Arrigoni, Elena / Crucitta, Stefania / Funel, Niccola / Fogli, Stefano / Vasile, Enrico / Musettini, Gianna / Fornaro, Lorenzo / Falcone, Alfredo / Danesi, Romano. ·Unit of Clinical Pharmacology & Pharmacogenetics, Department of Clinical & Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Italy. · Unit of Medical Oncology, Department of Translational Research & New Technologies in Medicine, University of Pisa, Italy. · Department of Translational Research & The New Technologies in Medicine & Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. ·Pharmacogenomics · Pubmed #30520336.

ABSTRACT: Circulating tumor DNA, circulating tumor cells and tumor-related exosomes may offer new opportunities to provide insights into the biological and clinical characteristics of a neoplastic disease. They represent alternative routes for diagnostic and prognostic purposes, and for predicting and longitudinally monitoring response to treatment and disease progression. Hence, circulating biomarkers represent promising noninvasive tools in the scenario of pancreatic cancer, where neither molecular nor clinical predictors of treatment benefit have been identified yet. This review aims to provide an overview of the current status of circulating biomarker research in pancreatic cancer, and discusses their potential clinical utility to facilitate clinical decision-making.

9 Article Systemic Chemotherapy for Advanced Rare Pancreatic Histotype Tumors: A Retrospective Multicenter Analysis. 2018

Brunetti, Oronzo / Aprile, Giuseppe / Marchetti, Paolo / Vasile, Enrico / Casadei Gardini, Andrea / Scartozzi, Mario / Barni, Sandro / Delfanti, Sara / De Vita, Fernando / Di Costanzo, Francesco / Milella, Michele / Cella, Chiara Alessandra / Berardi, Rossana / Cataldo, Ivana / Scarpa, Aldo / Basile, Debora / Mazzuca, Federica / Graziano, Giusi / Argentiero, Antonella / Santini, Daniele / Reni, Michele / Cascinu, Stefano / Silvestris, Nicola. ·Medical Oncology Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, University of Rome La Sapienza, Rome. · Medical Oncology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Pisa. · Department of MedicalOncology, Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Meldola. · Medical Oncology Unit, University of Cagliari, Cagliari. · Medical Oncology Unit, ASST Bergamo Ovest, Treviglio. · Medical Oncology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia. · Medical Oncology Unit, II University of Naples, Naples. · Medical OncologyUnit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Florence. · Medical Oncology 1, IRCCS Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome. · Division of Gastrointestinal and Neuroendocrine Tumors, IEO, Milan. · Medical Oncology Unit, Università Politecnica Marche - Ospedali Riuniti Ancona, Ancona. · Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, ARCNET, Verona. · Department of Medical Oncology, University and General Hospital, Udine. · Scientific Direction, Cancer Institute "Giovanni Paolo II," Bari. · Medical Oncology Unit, University Campus Biomedico, Rome. · Department of Medical Oncology, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan. · Modena Cancer Center, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Azienda Ospedaliera-Universitaria di Modena, Modena, Italy. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #29771769.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Two issues were put forth by clinicians in the management of the advanced stages of rare variants of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and other exocrine histotypes with peculiar clinical and pathological features: Do chemotherapy regimens recommended in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients have a clinical activity in rare pancreatic tumors? Or should other chemotherapy combinations be considered in this subset of patients? METHODS: We conducted a multicenter retrospective study that collected data from 2005 to 2016 at 14 Italian cancer centers with the aim to evaluate tumor response and time to progression for first- and second-line and overall survival. RESULTS: Of approximately 4300 exocrine pancreatic cancer patients, 79 advanced cases affected by rare histological types were identified, with pancreatic acinar cell cancer (n = 23), pancreatic adenosquamous cancer (n = 16), and mucinous cystic neoplasm with an associated invasive mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (n = 15) most represented. Survival analyses for each subgroup in relation with the different chemotherapy regimens showed the lack of statistical significance correlations. CONCLUSIONS: Because of the lack of clinical trials in patients affected by these rare pancreatic histotypes, only their molecular classification would help clinicians in future therapeutic choice.

10 Article Early changes in plasma DNA levels of mutant KRAS as a sensitive marker of response to chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer. 2017

Del Re, Marzia / Vivaldi, Caterina / Rofi, Eleonora / Vasile, Enrico / Miccoli, Mario / Caparello, Chiara / d'Arienzo, Paolo Davide / Fornaro, Lorenzo / Falcone, Alfredo / Danesi, Romano. ·Unit of Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacogenetics, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. marzia.delre@ao-pisa.toscana.it. · Medical Oncology Unit, Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Unit of Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacogenetics, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Department of Medical Sciences, Pisa, Italy. ·Sci Rep · Pubmed #28801547.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer (PDAC) is still lacking of reliable markers to monitor tumor response. CA 19-9 is the only biomarker approved, despite it has several limitations in sensitivity and specificity. Since mutations of KRAS occur in more than 90% of tumors, its detection in circulating free tumor DNA (cftDNA) could represent a biomarker to monitor chemotherapy response. Twenty-seven advanced PDAC patients given first-line 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan and oxaliplatin or gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel were enrolled. Three ml of plasma were collected: 1) before starting chemotherapy (baseline); 2) at day 15 of treatment; and 3) at each clinical follow-up. cftDNA was extracted and analysed for KRAS mutations (

11 Article First-line treatment with FOLFOXIRI for advanced pancreatic cancer in clinical practice: Patients' outcome and analysis of prognostic factors. 2016

Vivaldi, Caterina / Caparello, Chiara / Musettini, Gianna / Pasquini, Giulia / Catanese, Silvia / Fornaro, Lorenzo / Lencioni, Monica / Falcone, Alfredo / Vasile, Enrico. ·Polo Oncologico, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Pisa, Italy. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #27038273.

ABSTRACT: FOLFIRINOX is a standard first-line treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer (aPC). The Gruppo Oncologico Nord Ovest (GONO) FOLFOXIRI regimen demonstrated efficacy in metastatic colorectal cancer. We aimed to evaluate activity and tolerability of FOLFOXIRI regimen in patients with aPC and to explore putative prognostic factors. One hundred thirty-seven consecutive aPC patients were treated with FOLFOXIRI in our institution between 2008 and 2014. Clinical, laboratory and pathological data were collected and their association with activity, progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was investigated. After a median follow up of 30 months, median PFS and OS were 8.0 months (95% CI 6.19-9.81) and 12 months (95% CI 9.75-14.25), respectively. Response rate was 38.6%, while disease-control rate 72.2%. At multivariate analysis liver metastases (p = 0.019; Hazard Ratio, HR, 0.59, 95% Confidence Interval, CI, 0.380.96), Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (PS) 1 (p = 0.001; HR 2.26, 95%CI 1.42-3.59) and neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR)> 4 (p= 0.002; HR: 2.42; 95% CI 1.38-4.25) were associated with poorer OS. We categorized 119 pts with complete available data as good-risk (0 factors, 38 pts), intermediate-risk (1 factor, 49 pts) and poor-risk (≥2 factors, 32 pts). Median OS for these three groups were 17.6, 11.1 and 7.4 months, respectively (p < 0.001). FOLFOXIRI is active and feasible in aPC. Prognosis of aPC pts treated with FOLFOXIRI is influenced by easily available factors: our analysis revealed ECOG PS, liver metastases and NLR as the most important predictors of survival. These factors could be helpful for treatment decision and clinical trial design.

12 Article A polymorphism in the promoter is associated with EZH2 expression but not with outcome in advanced pancreatic cancer patients. 2014

Maftouh, Mina / Avan, Amir / Funel, Niccola / Paolicchi, Elisa / Vasile, Enrico / Pacetti, Paola / Vaccaro, Vanja / Faviana, Pinuccia / Campani, Daniela / Caponi, Sara / Mambrini, Andrea / Boggi, Ugo / Cantore, Maurizio / Milella, Michele / Peters, Godefridus J / Reni, Michele / Giovannetti, Elisa. ·Department of Medical Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Cancer Center Amsterdam, CCA room 1.52, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Pharmacogenomics · Pubmed #24798718.

ABSTRACT: AIM: EZH2 expression is a prognostic marker in radically resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. Here we investigated its role in locally advanced/metastatic patients, as well as candidate polymorphisms. MATERIALS & METHODS: EZH2 expression and polymorphisms were evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription PCR in 32 laser microdissected tumors, while polymorphisms were also studied in blood samples from two additional cohorts treated with gemcitabine monotherapy (n = 93) or polychemotherapeutic regimens (n = 247). RESULTS: EZH2 expression correlated with survival and with the rs6958683 polymorphism in the first cohort of patients, but this polymorphism was not associated with survival in our larger cohorts. CONCLUSION: EZH2 is a prognostic factor for locally advanced/metastatic PDACs, while candidate polymorphisms cannot predict clinical outcome. Other factors involved in EZH2 regulation, such as miR-101, should be investigated in accessible samples in order to improve the clinical management of advanced PDAC.

13 Article Role of CYB5A in pancreatic cancer prognosis and autophagy modulation. 2014

Giovannetti, Elisa / Wang, Qiuyan / Avan, Amir / Funel, Niccola / Lagerweij, Tonny / Lee, Jih-Hsiang / Caretti, Viola / van der Velde, Arjan / Boggi, Ugo / Wang, Yisong / Vasile, Enrico / Peters, Godefridus J / Wurdinger, Thomas / Giaccone, Giuseppe. ·Affiliations of authors: Department of Medical Oncology (EG, AA, GJP) and Department of Neurosurgery (TL, VC, TW), VU University Medical Center, and Centre for Integrative Bioinformatics (AvdV), VU University, Amsterdam, the Netherlands · Department of Ricerca Traslazionale e delle Nuove Tecnologie in Medicina e Chirurgia, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy (NF, UB, EV) · Department of Neurology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (VC) · Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Neuroscience Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (TW) · Medical Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (QW, J-HL, YW, GG). ·J Natl Cancer Inst · Pubmed #24301457.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Loss of 18q22.3 is a prognostic marker in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). This study investigated genes encoded by this cytoband. METHODS: We studied mRNA/protein expression in radically resected (n = 130) and metastatic patients (n = 50). The role of CYB5A was tested in 11 PDAC cell lines and five primary cultures through retrovirus-mediated upregulation and small interfering RNA using wound-healing, invasion, annexin-V, electron microscopy, and autophagic assays, as well as autophagy genes and kinases arrays. CYB5A+ orthotopic models (n = 6 mice/group) were monitored by Firefly and Gaussia-luciferase bioluminescence, magnetic resonance imaging, and high-frequency ultrasound. Data were analyzed by t test, Fisher exact-test, log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards models. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: Both resected and metastatic patients with low mRNA or protein expression of CYB5A had statistically significantly shorter survival (eg, median = 16.7 months, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 13.5 to 19.9; vs median = 24.8 months, 95% CI = 12.8 to 36.9; P = .02, two-sided log-rank test; n = 82 radically resected PDACs), and multivariable analyses confirmed prognostic relevance. Moreover, we characterized a novel function to CYB5A, autophagy induction, concomitant with reduced proliferation and migration/invasion of PDAC cells. Network analysis of proautophagic pathways suggested CYB5A interaction with TRAF6, which was confirmed by TRAF6 downregulation after CYB5A reconstitution (-69% in SU.86.86-CYB5A+; P = .005, two-sided t test). CYB5A silencing had opposite effects, restoring TRAF6 expression and wound healing. In vivo studies showed that CYB5A induced autophagy while inhibiting tumor growth/metastasis and increasing survival (median = 57 days, 95% CI = 52 to 61; vs median = 44 days, 95% CI = 21 to 57; P = .03, two-sided log-rank test). CONCLUSIONS: These results define CYB5A as a novel prognostic factor for PDAC that exerts its tumor-suppressor function through autophagy induction and TRAF6 modulation.

14 Article Prognostic factors in gemcitabine-cisplatin polychemotherapy regimens in pancreatic cancer: XPD-Lys751Gln polymorphism strikes back. 2013

Avan, Amir / Pacetti, Paola / Reni, Michele / Milella, Michele / Vasile, Enrico / Mambrini, Andrea / Vaccaro, Vanja / Caponi, Sara / Cereda, Stefano / Peters, Godefridus J / Cantore, Maurizio / Giovannetti, Elisa. ·Department of Medical Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #23390054.

ABSTRACT: The use of platinated agents in combination chemotherapy regimens for advanced pancreatic cancer is controversial owing to the lack of an outstanding impact on the outcome and a substantial increase in hematologic and extra-hematologic toxicities. Pharmacogenetic studies to identify patients who could benefit most from such therapies are urgently needed. The Xeroderma-Pigmentosum group-D polymorphism at codon-751 (XPD-Lys751Gln) emerged as the most significant independent predictor for death- and progression-risk in our previous study on functional polymorphisms in 122 advanced pancreatic cancer patients treated with cisplatin-docetaxel-capecitabine-gemcitabine and cisplatin-epirubicin-capecitabine-gemcitabine (or EC-GemCap). To confirm the prognostic role of this variable, we further evaluated the correlation of XPD-Lys751Gln with outcome in another 125 patients treated with the same regimens, and 90 treated with gemcitabine monotherapy. Genotyping was successfully carried out in the vast majority of DNA samples. Genotype frequencies followed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and XPD-Lys751Gln was associated with differential progression-free and overall-survival. Multivariate analysis confirmed its prognostic significance in platinum-based regimens. In particular, XPD-Gln751Gln was significantly associated with risk of death (hazard ratio, HR = 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-2.6, p = 0.011) and risk of progression (HR = 1.7, 95% CI, 1.1-2.5, p = 0.013). No correlation was observed in gemcitabine monotherapy-treated patients. The analysis of DNA damage using extra-long-PCR in lymphocytes supported the association of XPD-Gln751Gln with greater resistance to cisplatin-induced damage. The increasing evidence of XPD-Lys751Gln impact on the outcome of gemcitabine-cisplatin-based polychemotherapy leads to plan prospective studies to validate the role of this polymorphism as a new tool for optimization of the currently available treatments in pancreatic cancer.

15 Article Adjuvant chemotherapy seems beneficial for invasive intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms. 2013

Caponi, S / Vasile, E / Funel, N / De Lio, N / Campani, D / Ginocchi, L / Lucchesi, M / Caparello, C / Lencioni, M / Cappelli, C / Costa, F / Pollina, L / Ricci, S / Mosca, F / Falcone, A / Boggi, U. ·Department of Oncology, Transplants, and New Technologies, U.O. Oncologia 2 Universitaria, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Polo Oncologico Area Vasta Nord-Ovest, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Via Roma 67, 56126 Pisa, Italy. ·Eur J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #23290583.

ABSTRACT: AIMS: The incidence of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is rising and these neoplasms now represent up to 25% of resected pancreatic neoplasms. The optimal postoperative management of resected invasive IPMN is still debated in the absence of large prospective clinical trials and of validated prognostic factors in this setting. The objective of our study was to identify potential prognostic factors and to investigate the role of adjuvant therapies for patients radically resected for invasive IPMN. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed clinical and pathological data regarding a large series of patients with invasive IPMN who underwent surgical resection in the last six years at University Hospital of Pisa. RESULTS: Sixty-four patients were considered for the analysis, thirty-three of whom received adjuvant chemotherapy with gemcitabine. In our series node involvement and high tumoral grade emerged as the major pathologic prognostic factors. Patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy with gemcitabine experienced a longer disease-free survival than those who received surgery alone. CONCLUSIONS: Gemcitabine-based chemotherapy seems beneficial as adjuvant treatment for patients with resected invasive IPMN.

16 Article The good, the bad and the ugly: a tale of miR-101, miR-21 and miR-155 in pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms. 2013

Caponi, S / Funel, N / Frampton, A E / Mosca, F / Santarpia, L / Van der Velde, A G / Jiao, L R / De Lio, N / Falcone, A / Kazemier, G / Meijer, G A / Verheul, H M / Vasile, E / Peters, G J / Boggi, U / Giovannetti, E. ·Unit Medical Oncology-2, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Pisa. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #23139258.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: This multicenter study evaluated three candidate microRNAs (miRNAs) (miR-21, miR-155 and miR-101) as potential biomarkers in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas. PATIENTS AND METHODS: miRNA expression was quantified by quantitative RT-PCR in 86 laser-microdissected specimens, including 65 invasive IPMNs, 16 non-invasive IPMNs and 5 normal pancreatic ductal tissues. Univariate and multivariate analyses compared miRNAs and clinical parameters with overall (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). RESULTS: miR-21 and miR-155 were up-regulated in invasive IPMNs compared with non-invasive IPMNs, as well as in non-invasive IPMNs compared with normal tissues. Conversely, miR-101 levels were significantly higher in non-invasive IPMNs and normal tissues compared with invasive IPMNs. High levels of miR-21 were associated with worse OS [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.47, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.37-5.65, P = 0.0047]. Patients with high-miR-21 expression also had a shorter median DFS (10.9 versus 29.9 months, P = 0.01). Multivariate analysis confirmed miR-21 as independently prognostic for mortality and disease progression (death risk: HR = 3.3, 95% CI = 1.5-7.0, P = 0.02; progression risk: HR = 2.3, 95% CI = 1.2-4.8, P = 0.02), as well as positive lymph-node status (death risk: HR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.1-6.3, P = 0.03; progression risk: HR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.0-4.8, P = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: miR-21, miR-155 and miR-101 showed significant differences in invasive versus non-invasive IPMNs. miR-21 emerged as an independent prognostic biomarker in invasive IPMNs and should be validated in prospective studies.

17 Article High-throughput microRNA (miRNAs) arrays unravel the prognostic role of MiR-211 in pancreatic cancer. 2012

Giovannetti, Elisa / van der Velde, Arjan / Funel, Niccola / Vasile, Enrico / Perrone, Vittorio / Leon, Leticia G / De Lio, Nelide / Avan, Amir / Caponi, Sara / Pollina, Luca E / Gallá, Valentina / Sudo, Hiroko / Falcone, Alfredo / Campani, Daniela / Boggi, Ugo / Peters, Godefridus J. ·Department of Medical Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. elisa.giovannetti@gmail.com ·PLoS One · Pubmed #23155457.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Only a subset of radically resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients benefit from chemotherapy, and identification of prognostic factors is warranted. Recently miRNAs emerged as diagnostic biomarkers and innovative therapeutic targets, while high-throughput arrays are opening new opportunities to evaluate whether they can predict clinical outcome. The present study evaluated whether comprehensive miRNA expression profiling correlated with overall survival (OS) in resected PDAC patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: High-resolution miRNA profiles were obtained with the Toray's 3D-Gene™-miRNA-chip, detecting more than 1200 human miRNAs. RNA was successfully isolated from paraffin-embedded primary tumors of 19 out of 26 stage-pT3N1 homogeneously treated patients (adjuvant gemcitabine 1000 mg/m(2)/day, days-1/8/15, every 28 days), carefully selected according to their outcome (OS<12 (N = 13) vs. OS>30 months (N = 6), i.e. short/long-OS). Highly stringent statistics included t-test, distance matrix with Spearman-ranked correlation, and iterative approaches. Unsupervised hierarchical analysis revealed that PDACs clustered according to their short/long-OS classification, while the feature selection algorithm RELIEF identified the top 4 discriminating miRNAs between the two groups. These miRNAs target more than 1500 transcripts, including 169 targeted by two or more. MiR-211 emerged as the best discriminating miRNA, with significantly higher expression in long- vs. short-OS patients. The expression of this miRNA was subsequently assessed by quantitative-PCR in an independent cohort of laser-microdissected PDACs from 60 resected patients treated with the same gemcitabine regimen. Patients with low miR-211 expression according to median value had a significantly shorter median OS (14.8, 95%CI = 13.1-16.5, vs. 25.7 months, 95%CI = 16.2-35.1, log-rank-P = 0.004). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that low miR-211 expression was an independent factor of poor prognosis (hazard ratio 2.3, P = 0.03) after adjusting for all the factors influencing outcome. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Through comprehensive microarray analysis and PCR validation we identified miR-211 as a prognostic factor in resected PDAC. These results prompt further prospective studies and research on the biological role of miR-211 in PDAC.

18 Article Association between DNA-repair polymorphisms and survival in pancreatic cancer patients treated with combination chemotherapy. 2011

Giovannetti, Elisa / Pacetti, Paola / Reni, Michele / Leon, Leticia G / Mambrini, Andrea / Vasile, Enrico / Ghidini, Michele / Funel, Niccola / Lucchesi, Matteo / Cereda, Stefano / Peters, Godefridus J / Cantore, Maurizio. ·Department of Medical Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. elisa.giovannetti@gmail.com ·Pharmacogenomics · Pubmed #22026922.

ABSTRACT: AIM: This multicenter study evaluated the association of 11 candidate polymorphisms in eight genes with outcome of pancreatic cancer patients treated with the equivalent polychemotherapeutic regimens: cisplatin/epirubicin/capecitabine/gemcitabine, cisplatin/docetaxel/capecitabine/gemcitabine and gemcitabine/capecitabine plus epirubicin/cisplatin intra-arterial infusion. PATIENTS & METHODS: Towards this end, polymorphisms were assessed in DNA from 122 pancreatic cancer stage-III/IV patients, and their associations with toxicity/response and progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival were evaluated using Pearson-χ(2) and log-rank test. RESULTS: Patients harboring XPD Gln751Gln, XPD Asp312Asn + Asn312Asn or XRCC1 Arg399Gln + Gln399Gln genotypes had a worse prognosis. XPD Gln751Gln (hazard ratio: 1.9; p = 0.003), as well as a combination of over two risk genotypes (hazard ratio: 2.7; p < 0.001), emerged as independent predictors for death risk at multivariate analysis. No correlations were observed with toxicity. Conversely, XPD Gln751Gln was associated with shorter PFS, while the lack of association with overall survival/PFS in gemcitabine monotherapy-treated patients suggested its role only for platinum-based regimens. CONCLUSION: Polymorphisms of DNA-repair genes appear to be candidate biomarkers of primary resistance to gemcitabine/cisplatin-based polychemotherapeutic regimens. The relatively small sample size, coupled with the retrospective and exploratory design of the present study, imply that these results should be considered as hypothesis generators, and should be further evaluated in larger and adequately designed retrospective/prospective studies.

19 Article MicroRNA-21 in pancreatic cancer: correlation with clinical outcome and pharmacologic aspects underlying its role in the modulation of gemcitabine activity. 2010

Giovannetti, Elisa / Funel, Niccola / Peters, Godefridus J / Del Chiaro, Marco / Erozenci, Leyla A / Vasile, Enrico / Leon, Leticia G / Pollina, Luca E / Groen, Annemieke / Falcone, Alfredo / Danesi, Romano / Campani, Daniela / Verheul, Henk M / Boggi, Ugo. ·VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. ·Cancer Res · Pubmed #20460539.

ABSTRACT: MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) was reported to be overexpressed and contributes to invasion and gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The aim of this study was to evaluate whether miR-21 expression was associated with the overall survival (OS) of PDAC patients treated with gemcitabine and to provide mechanistic insights for new therapeutic targets. miR-21 expression was evaluated in cells (including 7 PDAC cell lines, 7 primary cultures, fibroblasts, and a normal pancreatic ductal cell line) and tissues (neoplastic specimens from 81 PDAC patients and normal ductal samples) isolated by laser microdissection. The role of miR-21 on the pharmacologic effects of gemcitabine was studied with a specific miR-21 precursor (pre-miR-21). Patients with high miR-21 expression had a significantly shorter OS both in the metastatic and in the adjuvant setting. Multivariate analysis confirmed the prognostic significance of miR-21. miR-21 expression in primary cultures correlated with expression in their respective tissues and with gemcitabine resistance. Pre-miR-21 transfection significantly decreased antiproliferative effects and apoptosis induction by gemcitabine, whereas matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2/MMP-9 and vascular endothelial growth factor expression were upregulated. Addition of inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin resulted in decrease of phospho-Akt and prevented pre-miR-21-induced resistance to the proapoptotic effects of gemcitabine. miR-21 expression correlated with outcome in PDAC patients treated with gemcitabine. Modulation of apoptosis, Akt phosphorylation, and expression of genes involved in invasive behavior may contribute to the role of miR-21 in gemcitabine chemoresistance and to the rational development of new targeted combinations.

20 Minor FOLFIRINOX Adjuvant Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer. 2019

Vivaldi, Caterina / Fornaro, Lorenzo / Vasile, Enrico. ·Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Pisa, Italy caterinavivaldi@gmail.com. ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #30893543.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Minor Comment on: 'Nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine for metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma after Folfirinox failure: an AGEO prospective multicentre cohort'. 2016

Vivaldi, Caterina / Fornaro, Lorenzo / Caparello, Chiara / Falcone, Alfredo / Vasile, Enrico. ·Polo Oncologico, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Via Roma 67, 56126 Pisa, Italy. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #27124336.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Minor Correlation of basal EGFR expression with pancreatic cancer grading but not with clinical outcome after gemcitabine-based treatment. 2011

Funel, N / Vasile, E / Del Chiaro, M / Boggi, U / Falcone, A / Campani, D / Scarpa, A / Giovannetti, E. · ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #21196439.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --