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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Roberto Valente
Based on 20 articles published since 2009
(Why 20 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, R. Valente wrote the following 20 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Pancreatic Cancer. 2017

Vujasinovic, Miroslav / Valente, Roberto / Del Chiaro, Marco / Permert, Johan / Löhr, J-Matthias. ·Center for Digestive Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm SE-141 86, Sweden. miroslav.vujasinovic@karolinska.se. · Center for Digestive Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm SE-141 86, Sweden. roberto.valente@karolinska.se. · Center for Digestive Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm SE-141 86, Sweden. marco.del-chiaro@ki.se. · Center for Digestive Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm SE-141 86, Sweden. johan.permert@karolinska.se. · Center for Digestive Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm SE-141 86, Sweden. matthias.lohr@ki.se. ·Nutrients · Pubmed #28241470.

ABSTRACT:

2 Review Minimally Invasive Pancreaticoduodenectomy for the Treatment of Pancreatic-Head and Periampullary Tumors. 2017

Del Chiaro, Marco / Valente, Roberto / Arnelo, Urban. ·Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Division of Surgery, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute at Center for Digestive Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. ·JAMA Surg · Pubmed #28030664.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Review Diabetes, smoking, alcohol use, and family history of cancer as risk factors for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2015

Haugvik, Sven-Petter / Hedenström, Per / Korsæth, Emilie / Valente, Roberto / Hayes, Alastair / Siuka, Darko / Maisonneuve, Patrick / Gladhaug, Ivar Prydz / Lindkvist, Björn / Capurso, Gabriele. ·Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. ·Neuroendocrinology · Pubmed #25613442.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Risk factors for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are not well understood. The aim of this systematic review was to assess if diabetes mellitus, smoking, alcohol use, and family history of cancer are risk factors for PNETs. METHODS: MEDLINE and abstracts from the European and North American Neuroendocrine Tumor Societies (ENETS and NANETS) were searched for studies published until October 2013. Eligible studies were selected according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. RESULTS: Five studies evaluating 4 individual populations were included (study accrual period 2000-2011) into the meta-analysis, involving 827 cases (range 160-309 per study) and 2,407 controls (range 233-924 per study). All studies had a case-control design and described regional series. The pooled adjusted odds ratio was 2.74 (95% CI: 1.63-4.62; p < 0.01; I(2) = 60.4%) for history of diabetes, 1.21 (95% CI: 0.92-1.58; p = 0.18; I(2) = 45.8%) for ever smoking, 1.37 (95% CI: 0.99-1.91; p = 0.06; I(2) = 0.0%) for heavy smoking, 1.09 (95% CI: 0.64-1.85; p = 0.75; I(2) = 85.2%) for ever alcohol use, 2.72 (95% CI: 1.25-5.91; p = 0.01; I(2) = 57.8%) for heavy alcohol use, and 2.16 (95% CI: 1.64-2.85; p < 0.01; I(2) = 0.0%) for first-degree family history of cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Diabetes mellitus and first-degree family history of cancer are associated with an increased risk of sporadic PNET. There was also a trend for diagnosis of sporadic PNET associated with heavy smoking. Alcohol use may be a risk factor for PNET, but there was considerable heterogeneity in the meta-analysis. These results suggest the need for a larger, homogeneous, international study for the clarification of risk factors for the occurrence of PNET.

4 Review Molecular pathology and genetics of pancreatic endocrine tumours. 2012

Capurso, Gabriele / Festa, Stefano / Valente, Roberto / Piciucchi, Matteo / Panzuto, Francesco / Jensen, Robert T / Delle Fave, Gianfranco. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, S. Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Via di Grottarossa 1035, 00189 Rome, Italy. ·J Mol Endocrinol · Pubmed #22586144.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (PETs) are the second most frequent pancreatic neoplasms. Their poor chemosensitivity, high rate of metastatic disease and relatively long survival make PETs an ideal field to be explored for novel therapies based on specific molecular changes. PETs are generally sporadic but can also arise within hereditary syndromes, such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, von Hippel-Lindau, neurofibromatosis type 1 and tuberous sclerosis complex, which represent a model for sporadic cases too. Among allelic imbalances, main genomic changes involve gain of 17q, 7q and 20q and loss of 11q, 6q and 11p, which identify regions of putative candidate oncogenes or tumour suppressor genes (TSGs), respectively, sometime with potential prognostic significance. Overexpression of Src-like kinases and cyclin D1 (CCND1) oncogene has been described. As for TSGs, P53 (TP53), DPC4/SMAD4 and RB (RB1) are not implicated in PET tumorigenesis, while for p16INK4a (CDKN2A), TIMP3, RASSF1A and hMLH1, more data are available, suggesting a role for methylation as a silencing mechanism. In the last decade, gene expression profile studies, analysis of microRNAs and, more recently, large-scale mutational analysis have highlighted commonly altered molecular pathways in the pathology of PETs. The roles of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, and its connection with Src kinases, and the activity of a number of tyrosine kinase receptors seem to be pivotal, as confirmed by the results of recent clinical trials with targeted agents. Mutations of DAXX and ATRX are common and related to altered telomeres but not to prognosis.

5 Article Main pancreatic duct dilation greater than 6 mm is associated with an increased risk of high-grade dysplasia and cancer in IPMN patients. 2019

Ateeb, Zeeshan / Valente, Roberto / Pozzi-Mucelli, Raffaella M / Malgerud, Linnéa / Schlieper, Yasmine / Rangelova, Elena / Fernandez-Moro, Carlos / Löhr, Johannes Matthias / Arnelo, Urban / Del Chiaro, Marco. ·Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention, and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Digestive and Liver Diseases Unit, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Division of Radiology, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention, and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Division of Pathology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention, and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. marco.delchiaro@ucdenver.edu. · Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, 12631 E. 17th Avenue, C-313, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA. marco.delchiaro@ucdenver.edu. ·Langenbecks Arch Surg · Pubmed #30612152.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: IPMNs, considered precursor lesions of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC), might display histological alteration varying from low-grade dysplasia (LGD) to cancer. Nevertheless, the prevalence of PDAC is far below the prevalence of IPMN; therefore, not all of these precursor lesions finally progress to cancer. Preoperative features consistent with and finding at final histology of high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or cancer are currently lacking. The aim of this study is to correlate the presence of preoperative clinical features with the finding of advance lesions at final histology. METHODS: This is retrospective cohort analysis of patients who underwent surgery for histologically confirmed IPMNs at Karolinska University Hospital, from 2008 to 2015. RESULTS: MPD 6-9.9 mm and ≥ 10 mm were associated with an increased risk of HGD/cancer (respectively, OR 2.92, CI 1.38-6.20, p = 0.005 and OR 2.65, CI 1.12-6.25, p = 0.02). Preoperative high CA19.9 and jaundice were both associated with a higher risk of HGD/cancer at final histology (respectively, OR 4.15, CI 1.90-9.05, p = 0.0003 and OR 15.36, CI 1.94-121.22, p = 0.009). At sex- and age-adjusted multivariable logistic regression analysis, MPD between 6 and 9.9 mm (OR 2.64, CI 1.15-6.06, p = 0.02), jaundice (OR 12.43, CI 1.44-106.93, p = 0.02), and elevated CA19.9 (OR 3.71, CI 1.63-8.46, p = 0.001) remained associated with the occurrence of HGD/cancer. DISCUSSION: The presence of MPD dilation ≥ 6 mm, jaundice, and elevated CA19.9 in IPMN patients are consistent with the finding for HGD/cancer at final histology, thus representing possible markers of advanced lesions suitable for earlier or preventive curative surgical treatment.

6 Article Solid pseudopapillary tumour of the pancreas: clinicopathological analysis. 2018

McCluney, Simon / Wijesuriya, Nilukshi / Sheshappanavar, Vinayata / Chin-Aleong, Joanne / Feakins, Roger / Hutchins, Robert / Abraham, Ajit / Bhattacharya, Satyajit / Valente, Roberto / Kocher, Hemant. ·Barts and the London HPB Centre, Department of Surgery, The Royal London Hospital, Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK. · Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. ·ANZ J Surg · Pubmed #29316119.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: We report on our experience of the surgical management and outcomes of 11 patients with solid pseudopapillary tumour of the pancreas (SPT). We sought to correlate the immunohistochemical staining of these tumours with that previously reported in the literature. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of the clinical presentation, radiological findings, surgical treatment, histopathological characteristics and outcomes for patients surgically managed with SPT at The Royal London Hospital. A literature search was performed to analyse the immunohistochemical stains commonly used to diagnose SPT. RESULTS: Between August 2006 and April 2016, 10 females and one male patient underwent surgery for SPT. The localization of the tumour was in the pancreatic head in two patients, one in the neck, three in the body and five in the tail. All 11 patients had localised disease. Six patients suffered post-surgical complications. Histopathology shows immunoreactivity for: β-catenin, vimentin, CD-10, CD-56, α1-antitrypsin and negative staining for synaptophysin and chromogranin. At a median of 24 months of follow-up, the disease-free survival rate was 100% and no recurrence was noted. A literature review generated 38 suitable articles with 116 individual cases of SPT, with high expression of vimentin and neuron specific enolase throughout, and low rates of chromogranin and synatophysin positivity. CONCLUSION: SPT is rare and affects mostly young women. An accurate diagnosis is important as the relative indolent behaviour can be managed with surgical resection even when large in size, bringing excellent long-term outcomes.

7 Article Pancreatectomies for pancreatic neoplasms in pediatric and adolescent age: A single institution experience. 2018

Scandavini, Chiara / Valente, Roberto / Rangelova, Elena / Segersvärd, Ralf / Arnelo, Urban / Permert, Johan / Svensson, Pär-Johan / Stenman, Jakob / Del Chiaro, Marco. ·Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Division of Surgery (KLINTEC) - Karolinska Institutet at Center for Digestive Diseases Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Division of Surgery (KLINTEC) - Karolinska Institutet at Center for Digestive Diseases Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Digestive and Liver Diseases Unit - Sapienza University of Rome, Italy. · Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital and Department for Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Division of Surgery (KLINTEC) - Karolinska Institutet at Center for Digestive Diseases Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: marco.del.chiaro@ki.se. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #29277262.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There are very few data in the current literature regarding the short- and long-term outcome of surgery for pediatric pancreatic tumors (PPT). No data are available on the impact of pancreatic surgery on the children's growth. METHODS: This is a retrospective cohort study on a consecutive series of pediatric/adolescent patients who underwent pediatric surgery at Karolinska University Hospital from January 2005 to July 2017. RESULTS: Overall 14 pancreatic operations were performed in 13 patients. The median age was 11.4 years (range 3-15). Six pancreaticoduodenectomies (42.8%), 5 distal pancreatectomies (35.7%), and 3 enucleations (21.5%) were performed. The final histology revealed a solid pseudopapillary tumor in 9 cases (69.2%), neuroblastoma in 1 (7.7%), ganglioneuroma in 1 (7.7%), pancreatoblastoma in 1 (7.7%), and insulinoma in 1 (7.7%). Overall, 3 patients developed post-operative complications (23%). There was no peri-operative mortality. All patients are alive after a median follow-up time of 80 months. Exocrine insufficiency was detected post-operatively in 4 patients (30.7%) Endocrine insufficiency requiring insulin treatment developed in one patient (7.7%). No significant impact on growth was detected in any of the patients after pancreatic resection. CONCLUSIONS: In our series, surgery performed for PPTs seems to be safe and effective. The effect of pancreatic surgery on children's growth does not seem to be significant.

8 Article Do pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis share the same genetic risk factors? A PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium investigation. 2018

Campa, Daniele / Pastore, Manuela / Capurso, Gabriele / Hackert, Thilo / Di Leo, Milena / Izbicki, Jakob R / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Gioffreda, Domenica / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Pasquali, Claudio / Macinga, Peter / Kaaks, Rudolf / Stigliano, Serena / Peeters, Petra H / Key, Timothy J / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Vodicka, Pavel / Valente, Roberto / Vashist, Yogesh K / Salvia, Roberto / Papaconstantinou, Ioannis / Shimizu, Yasuhiro / Valsuani, Chiara / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Gazouli, Maria / Valantiene, Irena / Niesen, Willem / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Hara, Kazuo / Soucek, Pavel / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Johnson, Theron / Brenner, Herman / Tavano, Francesca / Fogar, Paola / Ito, Hidemi / Sperti, Cosimo / Butterbach, Katja / Latiano, Anna / Andriulli, Angelo / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Busch, Olivier R C / Dijk, Frederike / Greenhalf, William / Matsuo, Keitaro / Lombardo, Carlo / Strobel, Oliver / König, Anna-Katharina / Cuk, Katarina / Strothmann, Hendrik / Katzke, Verena / Cantore, Maurizio / Mambrini, Andrea / Oliverius, Martin / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Landi, Stefano / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Clinical Gerontology Unit, Addenbrooke's Hospital, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Academy of Sciences and Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Visceral Surgery, Kantonsspital Aarau AG, Aarau, Switzerland. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Second Department of Surgery, Aretaieion Hospital, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Oncological Department, Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Oncological Unit of Massa Carrara, Carrara, Massa and Carrara, Italy. · Department of Medicine (DIMED), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Division of Molecular and Clinical Epidemiology, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Epidemiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Institute for Health Research, Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Dipartimento di Ricerca Traslazionale e delle Nuove Tecnologie in Medicina e Chirurgia, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Transplant Surgery Department, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #28913878.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a very aggressive tumor with a five-year survival of less than 6%. Chronic pancreatitis (CP), an inflammatory process in of the pancreas, is a strong risk factor for PDAC. Several genetic polymorphisms have been discovered as susceptibility loci for both CP and PDAC. Since CP and PDAC share a consistent number of epidemiologic risk factors, the aim of this study was to investigate whether specific CP risk loci also contribute to PDAC susceptibility. We selected five common SNPs (rs11988997, rs379742, rs10273639, rs2995271 and rs12688220) that were identified as susceptibility markers for CP and analyzed them in 2,914 PDAC cases, 356 CP cases and 5,596 controls retrospectively collected in the context of the international PANDoRA consortium. We found a weak association between the minor allele of the PRSS1-PRSS2-rs10273639 and an increased risk of developing PDAC (OR

9 Article Exclusive and Combined Use of Statins and Aspirin and the Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: a Case-Control Study. 2017

Archibugi, Livia / Piciucchi, Matteo / Stigliano, Serena / Valente, Roberto / Zerboni, Giulia / Barucca, Viola / Milella, Michele / Maisonneuve, Patrick / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Capurso, Gabriele. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Medical Oncology Unit, Istituto Nazionale Tumori Regina Elena (IFO), Rome, Italy. · Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. gabriele.capurso@gmail.com. ·Sci Rep · Pubmed #29026148.

ABSTRACT: Data on the association between aspirin and statin use and Pancreatic Ductal AdenoCarcinoma (PDAC) risk are conflicting. These drugs are often co-prescribed, but no studies evaluated the potential combined or confounding effect of the two at the same time. We aimed to investigate the association between aspirin and statin exclusive and combined use and PDAC occurrence. Data on environmental factors, family and medical history were screened in a case-control study. PDAC cases were matched to controls for age and gender. Power calculation performed ahead. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals(CI) were obtained from multivariable logistic regression analysis. In 408 PDAC patients and 816 matched controls, overall statin (OR 0.61; 95%CI,0.43-0.88), but not aspirin use was associated to reduced PDAC risk. Compared to non-users, exclusive statin (OR 0.51; 95%CI,0.32-0.80) and exclusive aspirin users (OR 0.64; 95%CI,0.40-1.01) had reduced PDAC risk. Concomitant statin and aspirin use did not further reduce the risk compared with statin use alone and no interaction was evident. Statin protective association was dose-dependent, and consistent in most subgroups, being stronger in smokers, elderly, obese and non-diabetic patients. The present study suggests that statin use is associated to reduced PDAC risk, supporting a chemopreventive action of statins on PDAC.

10 Article Major postoperative complications after pancreatic resection for P-NETS are not associated to earlier recurrence. 2017

Valente, R / Lykoudis, P / Tamburrino, D / Inama, M / Passas, I / Toumpanakis, C / Luong, T V / Davidson, B / Imber, C / Malagò, M / Rahman, S H / Shankar, A / Sharma, D / Caplin, M / Fusai, G. ·Department of Hepatopancreatobiliary and Liver Transplantation Surgery, Royal Free and University College London, NW32QG, UK; Hepatopancreatobiliary Service, Barts Health NHS Trust, The Royal London Hospital, E1 1BZ, UK. Electronic address: r.valente@ucl.ac.uk. · Department of Hepatopancreatobiliary and Liver Transplantation Surgery, Royal Free and University College London, NW32QG, UK. · Neuroendocrine Tumour Unit, Royal Free and University College London, NW32QG, UK. · Histopathology Unit, Royal Free and University College London, NW32QG, UK. ·Eur J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #28821361.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The oncological impact of surgical complications has been studied in visceral and pancreatic cancer. AIM: To investigate the impact of complications on tumour recurrence after resections for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. METHODS: We have retrospectively analysed 105 consecutive resections performed at the Royal Free London Hospital from 1998 to 2014, and studied the long-term outcome of nil-minor (<3) versus major (≥3) Clavien-Dindo complications (CD) on disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS). RESULTS: The series accounted for 41 (39%) pancreaticoduodenectomies, two (1.9%) central, 48 (45.7%) distal pancreatectomies, eight (7.6%) enucleations, four (3.8%) total pancreatectomies. Sixteen (15.2%) were extended to adjacent organs, 13 (12.3%) to minor liver resections. Postoperative complications presented in 43 (40.1%) patients; CD grade 1 or 2 in 23 (21.9%), grades ≥3 in 20 (19%). Among 25 (23.8%) pancreatic fistulas, 14 (13.3%) were grades B or C. Thirty-four (32.4%) patients developed exocrine, and 31 (29.5%) endocrine insufficiency. Seven patients died during a median 27 (0-175) months follow up. Thirty-day mortality was 0.9%. OS was 94.1% at 5 years. Thirty tumours recurred within 11.7 (0.8-141.5) months. DFS was 44% at 5 years. At univariate analysis, high-grade complications were not associated with shorter DFS (p = 0.744). At multivariate analysis, no parameter was independent predictor for DFS or OS. The comparison of nil-minor versus major complications showed no DFS difference (p = 0.253). CONCLUSION: From our series, major complications after P-NETs resection are not associated to different disease recurrence; hence do not require different follow up or adjuvant regimens.

11 Article Neoadjuvant Treatment in Locally Advanced and Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer vs Primary Resectable Pancreatic Cancer. 2017

Del Chiaro, Marco / Valente, Roberto / Arnelo, Urban. ·Pancreatic Surgery Unit, Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention, and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. ·JAMA Surg · Pubmed #28700786.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Article Risk and protective factors for the occurrence of sporadic pancreatic endocrine neoplasms. 2017

Valente, Roberto / Hayes, Alastair J / Haugvik, Sven-Petter / Hedenström, Per / Siuka, Darko / Korsæth, Emilie / Kämmerer, Daniel / Robinson, Stuart M / Maisonneuve, Patrick / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Lindkvist, Bjorn / Capurso, Gabriele. ·Digestive and Liver Disease UnitSant' Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of General SurgeryRoyal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. · Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary SurgeryOslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Unit of GastroenterologyDepartment of Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. · Department of GastroenterologyUniversity Medical Centre Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia. · Department of General and Visceral SurgeryZentralklinik Bad Berka, Bad Berka, Germany. · Department of Hepatopancreatobiliary and Transplantation SurgeryThe Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Division of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsEuropean Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease UnitSant' Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy gabriele.capurso@gmail.com. ·Endocr Relat Cancer · Pubmed #28566532.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PNENs) represent 10% of all pancreatic tumors by prevalence. Their incidence has reportedly increased over recent decades in parallel with that of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PNENs are relatively rare, and of the few institutions that have published potential risk factors, findings have been heterogeneous. Our objective was to investigate the association between potential risk and protective factors for the occurrence of sporadic PNENs across a European population from several institutions. A multinational European case-control study was conducted to examine the association of selected environmental, family and medical exposure factors using a standardized questionnaire in face-to-face interviews. A ratio of 1:3 cases to controls were sex and age matched at each study site. Adjusted univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed for statistically significant factors. The following results were obtained: In 201 cases and 603 controls, non-recent onset diabetes (OR 2.09, CI 1.27-3.46) was associated with an increased occurrence of PNENs. The prevalence of non-recent onset diabetes was higher both in cases with metastatic disease (TNM stage III-IV) or advanced grade (G3) at the time of diagnosis. The use of metformin in combination with insulin was also associated with a more aggressive phenotype. Drinking coffee was more frequent in cases with localized disease at diagnosis. Our study concluded that non-recent onset diabetes was associated with an increased occurrence of PNENs and the combination of metformin and insulin was consistent with a more aggressive PNEN phenotype. In contrast to previous studies, smoking, alcohol and first-degree family history of cancer were not associated with PNEN occurrence.

13 Article Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasms: To Needle or Not To Needle, This Is the Question. 2017

Del Chiaro, Marco / Arnelo, Urban / Valente, Roberto. ·Division of Surgery (CLINTEC), Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. ·Am J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #28469233.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Article The Neutrophil/Lymphocyte Ratio at Diagnosis Is Significantly Associated with Survival in Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer Patients. 2017

Piciucchi, Matteo / Stigliano, Serena / Archibugi, Livia / Zerboni, Giulia / Signoretti, Marianna / Barucca, Viola / Valente, Roberto / Fave, Gianfranco Delle / Capurso, Gabriele. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. matteopiciucchi@libero.it. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. seri_stigliano@yahoo.it. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. livia.archibugi@hotmail.it. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. giulia.zerboni@gmail.com. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. mariannasignoretti@gmail.com. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. viola.barucca@gmail.com. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. robbie.valente@gmail.com. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. gianfranco.dellefave@gmail.com. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology,"Sapienza" University of Rome, 00189 Rome, Italy. gabriele.capurso@gmail.com. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #28353661.

ABSTRACT: Different inflammation-based scores such as the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), the Odonera Prognostic Nutritional Index (PNI), the Glasgow Prognostic Score, the platelet/lymphocyte ratio, and the C-reactive protein/albumin ratio have been found to be significantly associated with pancreatic cancer (PDAC) prognosis. However, most studies have investigated patients undergoing surgery, and few of them have compared these scores. We aimed at evaluating the association between inflammatory-based scores and PDAC prognosis. In a single center cohort study, inflammatory-based scores were assessed at diagnosis and their prognostic relevance as well as that of clinic-pathological variables were evaluated through multiple logistic regression and survival probability analysis. In 206 patients, age, male sex, tumor size, presence of distant metastasis, access to chemotherapy, and an NLR > 5 but not other scores were associated with overall survival (OS) at multivariate analysis. Patients with an NLR < 5 had a median survival of 12 months compared to 4 months in those with an NLR > 5. In the 81 patients with distant metastasis at diagnosis, an NLR > 5 resulted in the only variable significantly associated with survival. Among patients with metastatic disease who received chemotherapy, the median survival was 3 months in patients with an NLR > 5 and 7 months in those with an NLR < 5. The NLR might drive therapeutic options in PDAC patients, especially in the setting of metastatic disease.

15 Article SLC22A3 polymorphisms do not modify pancreatic cancer risk, but may influence overall patient survival. 2017

Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Strouhal, Ondrej / Hughes, David J / Holcatova, Ivana / Oliverius, Martin / Kala, Zdenek / Campa, Daniele / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Canzian, Federico / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Sperti, Cosimo / Federico Zambon, Carlo / Pedrazzoli, Sergio / Fogar, Paola / Milanetto, Anna Caterina / Capurso, Gabriele / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Valente, Roberto / Gazouli, Maria / Malleo, Giuseppe / Teresa Lawlor, Rita / Strobel, Oliver / Hackert, Thilo / Giese, Nathalia / Vodicka, Pavel / Vodickova, Ludmila / Landi, Stefano / Tavano, Francesca / Gioffreda, Domenica / Piepoli, Ada / Pazienza, Valerio / Mambrini, Andrea / Pedata, Mariangela / Cantore, Maurizio / Bambi, Franco / Ermini, Stefano / Funel, Niccola / Lemstrova, Radmila / Soucek, Pavel. ·Department of Toxicogenomics, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Physiology &Centre for Systems Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland. · Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Transplantation Surgery, Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, The University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, Brno Bohunice, Czech Republic. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Digestive Diseases, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology -DiSCOG, University of Padova, Italy. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padova, Italy. · Clinica Chirurgica 4, University of Padova, Italy. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · ARC-NET Applied research on Cancer Centre, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Science of Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic and First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic. · Biomedical Centre, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Azienda USL 1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Blood Transfusion Service, Children's Hospital Meyer, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria, Florence, Italy. ·Sci Rep · Pubmed #28272475.

ABSTRACT: Expression of the solute carrier (SLC) transporter SLC22A3 gene is associated with overall survival of pancreatic cancer patients. This study tested whether genetic variability in SLC22A3 associates with pancreatic cancer risk and prognosis. Twenty four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tagging the SLC22A3 gene sequence and regulatory elements were selected for analysis. Of these, 22 were successfully evaluated in the discovery phase while six significant or suggestive variants entered the validation phase, comprising a total study number of 1,518 cases and 3,908 controls. In the discovery phase, rs2504938, rs9364554, and rs2457571 SNPs were significantly associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Moreover, rs7758229 associated with the presence of distant metastases, while rs512077 and rs2504956 correlated with overall survival of patients. Although replicated, the association for rs9364554 did not pass multiple testing corrections in the validation phase. Contrary to the discovery stage, rs2504938 associated with survival in the validation cohort, which was more pronounced in stage IV patients. In conclusion, common variation in the SLC22A3 gene is unlikely to significantly contribute to pancreatic cancer risk. The rs2504938 SNP in SLC22A3 significantly associates with an unfavorable prognosis of pancreatic cancer patients. Further investigation of this SNP effect on the molecular and clinical phenotype is warranted.

16 Article Functional single nucleotide polymorphisms within the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A/2B region affect pancreatic cancer risk. 2016

Campa, Daniele / Pastore, Manuela / Gentiluomo, Manuel / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Neoptolemos, John P / Niesen, Willem / Vodicka, Pavel / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Gazouli, Maria / Pacetti, Paola / Di Leo, Milena / Ito, Hidemi / Klüter, Harald / Soucek, Pavel / Corbo, Vincenzo / Yamao, Kenji / Hosono, Satoyo / Kaaks, Rudolf / Vashist, Yogesh / Gioffreda, Domenica / Strobel, Oliver / Shimizu, Yasuhiro / Dijk, Frederike / Andriulli, Angelo / Ivanauskas, Audrius / Bugert, Peter / Tavano, Francesca / Vodickova, Ludmila / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Lovecek, Martin / Landi, Stefano / Key, Timothy J / Boggi, Ugo / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Mambrini, Andrea / Bambi, Franco / Busch, Olivier / Pazienza, Valerio / Valente, Roberto / Theodoropoulos, George E / Hackert, Thilo / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Pasquali, Claudio / Basso, Daniela / Sperti, Cosimo / Matsuo, Keitaro / Büchler, Markus / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Izbicki, Jakob / Costello, Eithne / Katzke, Verena / Michalski, Christoph / Stepien, Anna / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. · Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Academy of Science, Prague, Czech Republic. · Institute of Biology and Medical Genetics, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Oncological Department Massa Carrara Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Carrara, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Division Epidemiology and Prevention, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Immunology, German Red Cross Blood Service Baden-Württemberg - Hessen gGmbH, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany. · Laboratory of Toxicogenomics, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Laboratory of Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · ARC-Net Research Centre, and Department of Diagnostics and Public Health University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Surgery I, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Epidemiology Unit Nuffield Department of Population Health University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, Pisa University Hospital, Pisa, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive System, Dant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Blood Transfusion Service, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Meyer, Florence, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Colorectal Unit, First Department of Propaedeutic Surgery, Athens Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology-DiSCOG, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Division of Molecular Medicine, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Clinical Gerontology Unit, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · Laboratory of Clinical, Transplant Immunology and Genetics, Copernicus Memorial Hospital, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #27486979.

ABSTRACT: The CDKN2A (p16) gene plays a key role in pancreatic cancer etiology. It is one of the most commonly somatically mutated genes in pancreatic cancer, rare germline mutations have been found to be associated with increased risk of developing familiar pancreatic cancer and CDKN2A promoter hyper-methylation has been suggested to play a critical role both in pancreatic cancer onset and prognosis. In addition several unrelated SNPs in the 9p21.3 region, that includes the CDNK2A, CDNK2B and the CDNK2B-AS1 genes, are associated with the development of cancer in various organs. However, association between the common genetic variability in this region and pancreatic cancer risk is not clearly understood. We sought to fill this gap in a case-control study genotyping 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 2,857 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients and 6,111 controls in the context of the Pancreatic Disease Research (PANDoRA) consortium. We found that the A allele of the rs3217992 SNP was associated with an increased pancreatic cancer risk (ORhet=1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.27, p=0.026, ORhom=1.30, 95% CI 1.12-1.51, p=0.00049). This pleiotropic variant is reported to be a mir-SNP that, by changing the binding site of one or more miRNAs, could influence the normal cell cycle progression and in turn increase PDAC risk. In conclusion, we observed a novel association in a pleiotropic region that has been found to be of key relevance in the susceptibility to various types of cancer and diabetes suggesting that the CDKN2A/B locus could represent a genetic link between diabetes and pancreatic cancer risk.

17 Article Long-Term Outcomes of Surgical Management of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors with Synchronous Liver Metastases. 2015

Partelli, Stefano / Inama, Marco / Rinke, Anja / Begum, Nehara / Valente, Roberto / Fendrich, Volker / Tamburrino, Domenico / Keck, Tobias / Caplin, Martyn E / Bartsch, Detlef / Thirlwell, Christina / Fusai, Giuseppe / Falconi, Massimo. ·Pancreatic Surgery Unit, University Hospital of Ancona, Ancona, Italy. ·Neuroendocrinology · Pubmed #26043944.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The value of surgical resection in the management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNET) with liver metastases (LM) is still debated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of surgery of PNET with LM. METHODS: Patients with PNET with synchronous LM between 2000 and 2011 from 4 high-volume institutions were included. The patients were divided into 3 groups: curative resection, palliative resection, and no resection. RESULTS: Overall, 166 patients were included. Eighteen patients (11%) underwent curative resection, 73 patients (43%) underwent palliative resection, and 75 patients (46%) underwent conservative treatment. The median overall survival (OS) from the time of diagnosis was 73 months. Patients who underwent curative resection had a significantly better median OS from the initial diagnosis compared with those who underwent palliative resection and those who were conservatively treated (97 vs. 89 vs. 36 months, p = 0.0001). The median OS from the time of diagnosis in those patients who underwent radical or palliative resection was 97 months, with a 5-year survival rate of 76%. On multivariate analysis, factors associated with OS from the time of diagnosis were the presence of bilobar metastases, tumor grading, and curative resection in a first model. On a second model, curative or palliative surgery was an independent predictor of OS. Among 91 patients who underwent surgery, the presence of pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma G3 was the only factor independently associated with a poorer survival after surgery (median OS: 35 vs. 97 months, p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with LM from PNET benefit from surgical resection, although surgery should be reserved to well- or moderately differentiated forms.

18 Article Early onset pancreatic cancer: risk factors, presentation and outcome. 2015

Piciucchi, Matteo / Capurso, Gabriele / Valente, Roberto / Larghi, Alberto / Archibugi, Livia / Signoretti, Marianna / Stigliano, Serena / Zerboni, Giulia / Barucca, Viola / La Torre, Marco / Cavallini, Marco / Costamagna, Guido / Marchetti, Paolo / Ziparo, Vincenzo / Delle Fave, Gianfranco. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy. · Endoscopy Division, Gemelli Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, Catholic University of Rome, Italy. · Oncology Department, S. Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy. · General Surgery Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy. Electronic address: gianfranco.dellefave@uniroma1.it. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #25708929.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: About 10% of pancreatic cancer patients are aged ≤50 at diagnosis and defined as Early Onset Pancreatic Cancer (EOPC). There is limited information regarding risk factors for EOPC occurrence and their outcome. AIM: To investigate risk factors, presentation features and outcome of EOPC patients. METHODS: Consecutive, histologically confirmed, pancreatic cancer patients enrolled. Data regarding environmental and genetic risk factors, clinical and pathological information, treatment and survival were recorded. EOPC patients (aged ≤50 at diagnosis) were compared to older subjects. RESULTS: Twenty-five of 293 patients (8.5%) had EOPC. There was no difference regarding sex distribution, medical conditions and alcohol intake between EOPC and older subjects. EOPC patients were more frequently current smokers (56% vs 28% p = 0.001) and started smoking at a significantly lower mean age (19.8 years, 95%CI 16.7-22.9) as compared to older patients (26.1, 95%CI 24.2-28) (p = 0.001). Current smoking (OR 7.5; 95%CI 1.8-30; p = 0.004) and age at smoking initiation (OR 0.8 for every increasing year; 95%CI 0.7-0.9; p = 0.01) were significant and independent risk factors for diagnosis of EOPC. There were no differences regarding genetic syndromes and pancreatic cancer family history. EOCP presented less frequently with jaundice (16% vs 44%, p = 0.006) and had a higher rate of unresectable disease, albeit not significantly (84% vs 68%, p = 0.1). EOPC patients were more frequently fit for surgery or chemotherapy than their counterpart, resulting in similar stage-specific survival probability. CONCLUSION: EOPC seems related to active and early smoking but not to familial syndromes. Young patients display aggressive disease but not worse outcome.

19 Article Outcomes of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with "Sendai-positive" criteria for resection undergoing non-operative management. 2013

Piciucchi, Matteo / Crippa, Stefano / Del Chiaro, Marco / Valente, Roberto / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Falconi, Massimo / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Capurso, Gabriele. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Psychology, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy. ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #23453065.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There are few data on the outcome of patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas meeting criteria for resection (Sendai-positive), and not operated. AIM: To evaluate outcome of patients with a resectable, Sendai-positive intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, and not operated. METHODS: Multicentre, retrospective analysis of prospectively enrolled patients, with resectable Sendai-positive, not-operated intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. Overall-survival and disease-specific survival were the primary end-point, and progression-free survival secondary. RESULTS: Thirty-five patients (60% male, median age 77) enrolled: 40% main-duct, 60% branch-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms. In 19 patients surgery was ruled out due to comorbidities, in 7 because aged > 80, 9 refused surgery. Twelve (34.3%) patients died after a mean of 32.5 months, 8 due to disease progression, 4 due to comorbidities. The median overall, disease-specific and progression-free survival were 52, 55, and 44 months respectively. Main duct involvement and age at diagnosis were associated with worse overall and progression-free survival, only main duct involvement with worse disease-specific survival (52 months main duct vs. 64 branch duct; P = 0.04). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that in elderly and comorbid patients with Sendai-positive intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, especially of the branch duct, a conservative approach could be reasonable, as associated with a relatively good outcome, and should be carefully discussed with the patients.

20 Minor Epigenetic dysregulation and poorer prognosis in DAXX-deficient pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. 2015

Pipinikas, Christodoulos P / Dibra, Harpreet / Karpathakis, Anna / Feber, Andrew / Novelli, Marco / Oukrif, Dahmane / Fusai, Guiseppe / Valente, Roberto / Caplin, Martyn / Meyer, Tim / Teschendorff, Andrew / Bell, Christopher / Morris, Tiffany J / Salomoni, Paolo / Luong, Tu-Vinh / Davidson, Brian / Beck, Stephan / Thirlwell, Christina. ·Medical Genomics Laboratory, University College London Cancer Institute, University College London72 Huntley Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK. · Medical Genomics Laboratory, University College London Cancer Institute, University College London72 Huntley Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK Medical Genomics Laboratory, University College London Cancer Institute, University College London72 Huntley Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK. · Medical Genomics Laboratory, University College London Cancer Institute, University College London72 Huntley Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK Medical Genomics Laboratory, University College London Cancer Institute, University College London72 Huntley Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK christina.thirlwell@ucl.ac.uk. ·Endocr Relat Cancer · Pubmed #25900181.

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