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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Shelley S. Tworoger
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Shelley S. Tworoger wrote the following 4 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Nurses' Health Study Contributions on the Epidemiology of Less Common Cancers: Endometrial, Ovarian, Pancreatic, and Hematologic. 2016

Birmann, Brenda M / Barnard, Mollie E / Bertrand, Kimberly A / Bao, Ying / Crous-Bou, Marta / Wolpin, Brian M / De Vivo, Immaculata / Tworoger, Shelley S. ·Brenda M. Birmann, Ying Bao, Marta Crous-Bou, Immaculata De Vivo, and Shelley S. Tworoger are with the Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. Mollie E. Barnard is with the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston. Kimberly A. Bertrand is with the Slone Epidemiology Center, Boston University, Boston. Brian M. Wolpin is with the Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School. ·Am J Public Health · Pubmed #27459458.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To review the contributions of the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) to epidemiologic knowledge of endometrial, ovarian, pancreatic, and hematologic cancers. METHODS: We reviewed selected NHS publications from 1976 to 2016, including publications from consortia and other pooled studies. RESULTS: NHS studies on less common cancers have identified novel risk factors, such as a reduced risk of endometrial cancer in women of advanced age at last birth, and have clarified or prospectively confirmed previously reported associations, including an inverse association between tubal ligation and ovarian cancer. Through biomarker research, the NHS has furthered understanding of the pathogenesis of rare cancers, such as the role of altered metabolism in pancreatic cancer risk and survival. NHS investigations have also demonstrated the importance of the timing of exposure, such as the finding of a positive association of early life body fatness, but not of usual adult body mass index, with non-Hodgkin lymphoma risk. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence from the NHS has informed prevention strategies and contributed to improved survival from less common but often lethal malignancies, including endometrial, ovarian, pancreatic, and hematologic cancers.

2 Article Circulating Metabolites and Survival Among Patients With Pancreatic Cancer. 2016

Yuan, Chen / Clish, Clary B / Wu, Chen / Mayers, Jared R / Kraft, Peter / Townsend, Mary K / Zhang, Mingfeng / Tworoger, Shelley S / Bao, Ying / Qian, Zhi Rong / Rubinson, Douglas A / Ng, Kimmie / Giovannucci, Edward L / Ogino, Shuji / Stampfer, Meir J / Gaziano, John Michael / Ma, Jing / Sesso, Howard D / Anderson, Garnet L / Cochrane, Barbara B / Manson, JoAnn E / Torrence, Margaret E / Kimmelman, Alec C / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Vander Heiden, Matthew G / Fuchs, Charles S / Wolpin, Brian M. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (CY, ZRQ, DAR, KN, SO, MGVH, CSF, BMW) · Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (CBC, MGVH) · Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China (CW) · Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research and Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (JRM, MET, MGVH) · Department of Epidemiology (PK, SST, ELG, SO, MJS, JM, HDS, JEM), Department of Biostatistics (PK), and Department of Nutrition (ELG, MJS), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA · Department of Pathology (SO), and Channing Division of Network Medicine (MKT, SST, YB, ELG, MJS, JM, JEM, CSF) and Division of Preventive Medicine (JMG, HDS, JEM), Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (MZ, LTA) · Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center (MAVERIC), VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA (JMG) · Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (GLA) · University of Washington School of Nursing, Seattle, WA (BBC) · Division of Genomic Stability and DNA repair, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (ACK). ·J Natl Cancer Inst · Pubmed #26755275.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic tumors cause changes in whole-body metabolism, but whether prediagnostic circulating metabolites predict survival is unknown. METHODS: We measured 82 metabolites by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in prediagnostic plasma from 484 pancreatic cancer case patients enrolled in four prospective cohort studies. Association of metabolites with survival was evaluated using Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for age, cohort, race/ethnicity, cancer stage, fasting time, and diagnosis year. After multiple-hypothesis testing correction, a P value of .0006 or less (.05/82) was considered statistically significant. Based on the results, we evaluated 33 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ACO1 gene, requiring a P value of less than .002 (.05/33) for statistical significance. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: Two metabolites in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle--isocitrate and aconitate--were statistically significantly associated with survival. Participants in the highest vs lowest quintile had hazard ratios (HRs) for death of 1.89 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06 to 3.35, Ptrend < .001) for isocitrate and 2.54 (95% CI = 1.42 to 4.54, Ptrend < .001) for aconitate. Isocitrate is interconverted with citrate via the intermediate aconitate in a reaction catalyzed by the enzyme aconitase 1 (ACO1). Therefore, we investigated the citrate to aconitate plus isocitrate ratio and SNPs in the ACO1 gene. The ratio was strongly associated with survival (P trend < .001) as was the SNP rs7874815 in the ACO1 gene (hazard ratio for death per minor allele = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.16 to 1.61, P < .001). Patients had an approximately three-fold hazard for death when possessing one or more minor alleles at rs7874851 and high aconitate or isocitrate. CONCLUSIONS: Prediagnostic circulating levels of TCA cycle intermediates and inherited ACO1 genotypes were associated with survival among patients with pancreatic cancer.

3 Article Elevation of circulating branched-chain amino acids is an early event in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma development. 2014

Mayers, Jared R / Wu, Chen / Clish, Clary B / Kraft, Peter / Torrence, Margaret E / Fiske, Brian P / Yuan, Chen / Bao, Ying / Townsend, Mary K / Tworoger, Shelley S / Davidson, Shawn M / Papagiannakopoulos, Thales / Yang, Annan / Dayton, Talya L / Ogino, Shuji / Stampfer, Meir J / Giovannucci, Edward L / Qian, Zhi Rong / Rubinson, Douglas A / Ma, Jing / Sesso, Howard D / Gaziano, John Michael / Cochrane, Barbara B / Liu, Simin / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Manson, JoAnn E / Pollak, Michael N / Kimmelman, Alec C / Souza, Amanda / Pierce, Kerry / Wang, Thomas J / Gerszten, Robert E / Fuchs, Charles S / Vander Heiden, Matthew G / Wolpin, Brian M. ·Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research and Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA. · Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA. · Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA. · Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Division of Genomic Stability and DNA repair, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana- Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02215. · Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center (MAVERIC), VA Boston Healthcare System. · University of Washington School of Nursing, Seattle, WA. · Departments of Epidemiology and Medicine, Brown University, Providence, RI. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University at Buffalo, SUNY, Buffalo, NY. · Departments of Oncology and Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. · Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN. · Cardiology Division, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. ·Nat Med · Pubmed #25261994.

ABSTRACT: Most patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are diagnosed with advanced disease and survive less than 12 months. PDAC has been linked with obesity and glucose intolerance, but whether changes in circulating metabolites are associated with early cancer progression is unknown. To better understand metabolic derangements associated with early disease, we profiled metabolites in prediagnostic plasma from individuals with pancreatic cancer (cases) and matched controls from four prospective cohort studies. We find that elevated plasma levels of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are associated with a greater than twofold increased risk of future pancreatic cancer diagnosis. This elevated risk was independent of known predisposing factors, with the strongest association observed among subjects with samples collected 2 to 5 years before diagnosis, when occult disease is probably present. We show that plasma BCAAs are also elevated in mice with early-stage pancreatic cancers driven by mutant Kras expression but not in mice with Kras-driven tumors in other tissues, and that breakdown of tissue protein accounts for the increase in plasma BCAAs that accompanies early-stage disease. Together, these findings suggest that increased whole-body protein breakdown is an early event in development of PDAC.

4 Article Circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D and the risk of rarer cancers: Design and methods of the Cohort Consortium Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers. 2010

Gallicchio, Lisa / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Chow, Wong-Ho / Freedman, D Michal / Hankinson, Susan E / Hartge, Patricia / Hartmuller, Virginia / Harvey, Chinonye / Hayes, Richard B / Horst, Ronald L / Koenig, Karen L / Kolonel, Laurence N / Laden, Francine / McCullough, Marjorie L / Parisi, Dominick / Purdue, Mark P / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Snyder, Kirk / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Tworoger, Shelley S / Varanasi, Arti / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wilkens, Lynne R / Xiang, Yong-Bing / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Zheng, Wei / Abnet, Christian C / Albanes, Demetrius / Bertrand, Kimberly / Weinstein, Stephanie J. ·Mercy Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland 21202, USA. lgallic@mdmercy.com ·Am J Epidemiol · Pubmed #20562188.

ABSTRACT: The Cohort Consortium Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers (VDPP), a consortium of 10 prospective cohort studies from the United States, Finland, and China, was formed to examine the associations between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations and the risk of rarer cancers. Cases (total n = 5,491) included incident primary endometrial (n = 830), kidney (n = 775), ovarian (n = 516), pancreatic (n = 952), and upper gastrointestinal tract (n = 1,065) cancers and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 1,353) diagnosed in the participating cohorts. At least 1 control was matched to each case on age, date of blood collection (1974-2006), sex, and race/ethnicity (n = 6,714). Covariate data were obtained from each cohort in a standardized manner. The majority of the serum or plasma samples were assayed in a central laboratory using a direct, competitive chemiluminescence immunoassay on the DiaSorin LIAISON platform (DiaSorin, Inc., Stillwater, Minnesota). Masked quality control samples included serum standards from the US National Institute of Standards and Technology. Conditional logistic regression analyses were conducted using clinically defined cutpoints, with 50-<75 nmol/L as the reference category. Meta-analyses were also conducted using inverse-variance weights in random-effects models. This consortium approach permits estimation of the association between 25(OH)D and several rarer cancers with high accuracy and precision across a wide range of 25(OH)D concentrations.