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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Vishal Thapar
Based on 2 articles published since 2010
(Why 2 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Vishal Thapar wrote the following 2 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Stromal Microenvironment Shapes the Intratumoral Architecture of Pancreatic Cancer. 2019

Ligorio, Matteo / Sil, Srinjoy / Malagon-Lopez, Jose / Nieman, Linda T / Misale, Sandra / Di Pilato, Mauro / Ebright, Richard Y / Karabacak, Murat N / Kulkarni, Anupriya S / Liu, Ann / Vincent Jordan, Nicole / Franses, Joseph W / Philipp, Julia / Kreuzer, Johannes / Desai, Niyati / Arora, Kshitij S / Rajurkar, Mihir / Horwitz, Elad / Neyaz, Azfar / Tai, Eric / Magnus, Neelima K C / Vo, Kevin D / Yashaswini, Chittampalli N / Marangoni, Francesco / Boukhali, Myriam / Fatherree, Jackson P / Damon, Leah J / Xega, Kristina / Desai, Rushil / Choz, Melissa / Bersani, Francesca / Langenbucher, Adam / Thapar, Vishal / Morris, Robert / Wellner, Ulrich F / Schilling, Oliver / Lawrence, Michael S / Liss, Andrew S / Rivera, Miguel N / Deshpande, Vikram / Benes, Cyril H / Maheswaran, Shyamala / Haber, Daniel A / Fernandez-Del-Castillo, Carlos / Ferrone, Cristina R / Haas, Wilhelm / Aryee, Martin J / Ting, David T. ·Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Division of Rheumatology, Allergy, and Immunology, Center for Immunology and Inflammatory Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Center for Engineering in Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Clinic of Surgery, UKSH Campus Lübeck, Germany. · Institute of Pathology, University Medical Center Freiburg, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Division of Rheumatology, Allergy, and Immunology, Center for Immunology and Inflammatory Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, USA. · Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: aryee.martin@mgh.harvard.edu. · Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Electronic address: dting1@mgh.harvard.edu. ·Cell · Pubmed #31155233.

ABSTRACT: Single-cell technologies have described heterogeneity across tissues, but the spatial distribution and forces that drive single-cell phenotypes have not been well defined. Combining single-cell RNA and protein analytics in studying the role of stromal cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in modulating heterogeneity in pancreatic cancer (pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma [PDAC]) model systems, we have identified significant single-cell population shifts toward invasive epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and proliferative (PRO) phenotypes linked with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling. Using high-content digital imaging of RNA in situ hybridization in 195 PDAC tumors, we quantified these EMT and PRO subpopulations in 319,626 individual cancer cells that can be classified within the context of distinct tumor gland "units." Tumor gland typing provided an additional layer of intratumoral heterogeneity that was associated with differences in stromal abundance and clinical outcomes. This demonstrates the impact of the stroma in shaping tumor architecture by altering inherent patterns of tumor glands in human PDAC.

2 Article A tunable delivery platform to provide local chemotherapy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2016

Indolfi, Laura / Ligorio, Matteo / Ting, David T / Xega, Kristina / Tzafriri, Abraham R / Bersani, Francesca / Aceto, Nicola / Thapar, Vishal / Fuchs, Bryan C / Deshpande, Vikram / Baker, Aaron B / Ferrone, Cristina R / Haber, Daniel A / Langer, Robert / Clark, Jeffrey W / Edelman, Elazer R. ·Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA; Departments of Surgery, Medicine, and Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: lindolfi@mit.edu. · Departments of Surgery, Medicine, and Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy. · Departments of Surgery, Medicine, and Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: dting1@mgh.harvard.edu. · Departments of Surgery, Medicine, and Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · CBSET Inc., Department of Applied Sciences, Lexington, MA, USA. · Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA. · Departments of Surgery, Medicine, and Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MD, USA. · Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA; The David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA. · Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA; Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. ·Biomaterials · Pubmed #27082874.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most devastating and painful cancers. It is often highly resistant to therapy owing to inherent chemoresistance and the desmoplastic response that creates a barrier of fibrous tissue preventing transport of chemotherapeutics into the tumor. The growth of the tumor in pancreatic cancer often leads to invasion of other organs and partial or complete biliary obstruction, inducing intense pain for patients and necessitating tumor resection or repeated stenting. Here, we have developed a delivery device to provide enhanced palliative therapy for pancreatic cancer patients by providing high concentrations of chemotherapeutic compounds locally at the tumor site. This treatment could reduce the need for repeated procedures in advanced PDAC patients to debulk the tumor mass or stent the obstructed bile duct. To facilitate clinical translation, we created the device out of currently approved materials and drugs. We engineered an implantable poly(lactic-co-glycolic)-based biodegradable device that is able to linearly release high doses of chemotherapeutic drugs for up to 60 days. We created five patient-derived PDAC cell lines and tested their sensitivity to approved chemotherapeutic compounds. These in vitro experiments showed that paclitaxel was the most effective single agent across all cell lines. We compared the efficacy of systemic and local paclitaxel therapy on the patient-derived cell lines in an orthotopic xenograft model in mice (PDX). In this model, we found up to a 12-fold increase in suppression of tumor growth by local therapy in comparison to systemic administration and reduce retention into off-target organs. Herein, we highlight the efficacy of a local therapeutic approach to overcome PDAC chemoresistance and reduce the need for repeated interventions and biliary obstruction by preventing local tumor growth. Our results underscore the urgent need for an implantable drug-eluting platform to deliver cytotoxic agents directly within the tumor mass as a novel therapeutic strategy for patients with pancreatic cancer.